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Economic Analysis of Climate Change Adaptation

The Philippines is particularly vulnerable to climate change, as its extensive coastline is a key environmental and economic resource. Conserving ecosystems and protecting livelihoods depends to a large extent on stakeholders’ ability to predict the impact of climate change and on communities’ capacity to adapt. This study is an effort to better understand the risks associated with climate change, and assess adaptation and policy options to address these risks more effectively.

Technical Partnership to Improve Aquaculture Activity of SHOUHARDO II Program

The sandy beach at Cox’s Bazar stretches unbroken for further than the eye can see, and is the pride of the Bangladeshi people. Located in the country’s southeastern corner, the beach is a popular tourist destination for Bangladeshis and international visitors alike. Despite this, many of the local communities that call Cox’s Bazar home struggle with food insecurity and poverty.

Greening the economy: economic benefits of sustainable development

Balancing human demand for land and food with the need to protect the world’s dwindling natural resources is a global challenge. For developing nations, the challenge can seem insurmountable in the face of booming populations, entrenched poverty and limited institutional know-how for creating sustainable resource management policies. Developing nations can also miss out on tapping into the vast economic benefits that can come with reducing environmental damage and over-exploitation.

Farms for the future: climate smart farming in Bangladesh

The impact of changing climate patterns in the decades to come will be felt by nations across the globe, but perhaps none more so than Bangladesh. Global sea level rise threaten to inundate the low-lying country, the majority of which lies less than one meter above sea level on the world’s largest river delta.

Managing floodplain natural resources in Bangladesh and India

Bangladesh and the neighboring Indian state of West Bengal lie across the fertile delta floodplains where the Ganges River splits and then spills into the Bay of Bengal. With an estimated combined population of 250 million, the Ganges delta is one of the most populous regions of the world, and poverty in rural communities can be devastating. Managing the shared natural resources of the floodplains is vital to maintaining the area’s biodiversity, while reducing the poverty and malnutrition of those who rely on it. With potentially damaging aquaculture practices and overexploitation of fisheries resources spreading rapidly in some areas, understanding the best management practices for the floodplains, and developing policies to protect both environment and livelihoods is urgently needed.
 

Mapping the Bounty of the Coral Triangle

The warm tropical waters of the Coral Triangle in the South Pacific cover a little over 1% of the Earth’s surface, yet are host to over three quarters of all recorded coral species and thousands of fish species. The staggering biological diversity of marine life is sustained by an equally diverse mix of habitats including river estuaries, mangrove forests, seagrass beds and coral reefs. The 6.8 million square kilometers of the Coral Triangle cover the waters around the eastern half of Indonesia, as well as the Philippines, Malaysia, Timor-Leste, Papua New Guinea, and the Solomon Islands.

Developing capacity in Myanmar’s fisheries

Myanmar lies between Bangladesh and Thailand on the Bay of Bengal and is the largest country in Southeast Asia. The tropical nation has an impressive coastline that forms a quarter of its total perimeter, stretching almost 2000 kilometers along the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea.

Sustainable Development in the Coral Triangle

If marine biodiversity is what you are after, then look no further than the Coral Triangle. This remarkable patch of water spans the seas between the six Indo-Pacific nations of Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Timor-Leste, Papua New Guinea, and the Solomon Islands. The tropical waters of the Coral Triangle are among the most biologically diverse – and environmentally vulnerable – regions of the world. The Coral Triangle’s coral reefs, mangrove forests, and seagrass beds are home to vast numbers of fish, sharks and rays, as well as sea turtles and marine mammals.

Breeding improved prawns in India

India has enormous freshwater and low saline brackish water resources that can be utilized for freshwater prawn farming. Since the mid-1990s, production of the giant river prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) has boomed, making India the second largest freshwater prawn producer in the world. Over recent years, prawn production has been declining, threatening the ongoing success of the prawn industry, and the livelihoods of the communities it supports. The Genetic Improvement of Freshwater Prawn project aims to safeguard the future of the prawn industry in India through the establishment of a selective breeding program for high quality prawn stock.
 

Taming the king of fish: adapting Hilsa to aquaculture

The Ganges–Brahmaputra River Delta is the world’s largest delta, stretching across Bangladesh and West Bengal in northeast India and supporting a population of over 250 million people. Of all the fish in these tropical delta waters, the Hilsa (Tenualosa ilisha) holds a special place in the hearts and in the diets of people living in the region. The Hilsa is known locally as Macher Raja Ilish, or Hilsa the “king of fish” and has the honor of being the national fish of Bangladesh. Maintaining good supplies of wild Hilsa is an ongoing challenge in the face of threats from overfishing, habitat destruction and degradation, and the voracious appetite of an ever increasing population. Hilsa aquaculture may be one of the solutions.

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