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Contributing to Fisheries and Aquaculture Adaptation to Climate Change in Bangladesh

The Bangladeshi floodplains, which stretch out from the Padma, Jamuna and Meghna Rivers, are the lifeblood of communities throughout the densely-populated nation. Bangladesh has a turbulent tropical climate that brings annual monsoons as well as tropical cyclones that occasionally devastate the region. The increased variability and unpredictability of weather patterns threatens to make life on the Bangladeshi waterways more precarious than ever before.  The FAO-NAPA Climate Change Adaptation Concept Note Development project is a step towards increasing resilience and reducing the vulnerability of Bangladeshi fisheries and the aquaculture sector to climate change.

Preparing Cambodian Fisheries for a Changing Climate

With the Mekong cutting through the region, and Southeast Asia’s largest freshwater lake lying at its heart, it’s no surprise that much of Cambodia’s population relies on its waterways. With climate variability and uncertainty, the delicate ecosystems that are essential to the long-term survival of Cambodian fisheries are increasingly under threat.

Optimizing Water Management for Local Livelihoods in the Mekong Basin

With the high potential of hydroelectricity development, the Mekong Basin region faces a rapid, widespread development pressure in the decades to come. Cambodia, Lao PDR, and Vietnam are the main focus areas where more hydropower dam projects are to be built along the Mekong tributaries. Though such projects significantly contribute to regional and national economic growth, local riparian communities are the ones who bear the brunt of the environmental impacts they cause.  Livelihoods of local communities heavily depend on water from rivers and other natural resources in the area a complex way but this complexity is often overlooked by the environmental and social impact assessments conducted for hydropower projects. The past projects in the region, and from around the world, give us a glimpse of the magnitude of short-term and long-term impacts on the livelihoods of riparian communities.

Investing in small-scale aquaculture: the triple bottom line

In 2008 over 90% of global aquaculture production was in developing countries with the industry often dominated by small and medium scale enterprises. This growing demand for aquaculture products presents opportunities for improving the incomes and livelihoods of rural households across the aquaculture value chain – from fish fry production and nursing through to fish production, trading, marketing and services.

Taking an ecosystem approach to small scale fishing in the tropics

From beach-side communities dotted across the Solomon Islands archipelago, to coastal villages lining Tanzania’s Indian Ocean shoreline, thousands of communities rely on coastal fisheries.

More fish from Cambodia’s rice fields

The rice field fisheries (RFFs) of Cambodia cover a large part of the country in practically all areas where rice is cultivated. For human nutrition, fish and other aquatic animals (collectively referred to as ‘fish’ in this project) vary in importance – depending on the typology of the rice field fisheries, the source of the supply (e.g. lake and major rivers) and the demand or ‘need’ for fish as a source of animal protein.

Assessing the Impacts of Natural Resource Management and Policy Research in Development Programs

After decades of stagnation, global investment in agricultural research in pursuit of poverty reduction is on the rise. Developed nations are again looking to the many dimensions of agriculture, including forestry and fisheries, to help meet development goals (particularly the Millennium Development Goals) and accelerate progress. But, with increasing investment, there is also an increasing focus on the need for better outcomes and greater impacts from those investments.
 

Biodiversity of Freshwater Ecosystems: status, trends, pressures and conservation priorities

Freshwater in the form of rivers, lakes, groundwater and wetlands offers us a remarkably diverse array of natural functions and ecosystem services. However, there is clear and growing scientific evidence that we are on the verge of a major freshwater biodiversity crisis: in the 30 years between 1970 and 2000, populations of more than 300 freshwater species have declined by ~55 percent while those of terrestrial and marine systems each declined by ~32 percent.

Selecting the best tilapia strain to maximize productivity

The Philippines derives substantial benefits from its aquatic and fisheries resources. The contribution to the country’s total fish production from aquaculture has consistently increased, outpacing growth in both the small-scale and commercial fishery sectors.
 

Unleashing the potential of GIFT tilapia on the Indian subcontinent

This project involves the establishment of a satellite nucleus for the GIFT strain of tilapia in India, the design and conduct of a genetic improvement program for this strain, the development of dissemination strategies, and the enhancement of local capacity in the areas of selective breeding and genetics. The development and dissemination of a high yielding tilapia strain possessing desirable production characteristics is expected to bring about notable economic benefits for the country.
 

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