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Philippines

Economic Analysis of Climate Change Adaptation

The Philippines is particularly vulnerable to climate change, as its extensive coastline is a key environmental and economic resource. Conserving ecosystems and protecting livelihoods depends to a large extent on stakeholders’ ability to predict the impact of climate change and on communities’ capacity to adapt. This study is an effort to better understand the risks associated with climate change, and assess adaptation and policy options to address these risks more effectively.

Greening the economy: economic benefits of sustainable development

Balancing human demand for land and food with the need to protect the world’s dwindling natural resources is a global challenge. For developing nations, the challenge can seem insurmountable in the face of booming populations, entrenched poverty and limited institutional know-how for creating sustainable resource management policies. Developing nations can also miss out on tapping into the vast economic benefits that can come with reducing environmental damage and over-exploitation.

Mapping the Bounty of the Coral Triangle

The warm tropical waters of the Coral Triangle in the South Pacific cover a little over 1% of the Earth’s surface, yet are host to over three quarters of all recorded coral species and thousands of fish species. The staggering biological diversity of marine life is sustained by an equally diverse mix of habitats including river estuaries, mangrove forests, seagrass beds and coral reefs. The 6.8 million square kilometers of the Coral Triangle cover the waters around the eastern half of Indonesia, as well as the Philippines, Malaysia, Timor-Leste, Papua New Guinea, and the Solomon Islands.

Sustainable Development in the Coral Triangle

If marine biodiversity is what you are after, then look no further than the Coral Triangle. This remarkable patch of water spans the seas between the six Indo-Pacific nations of Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Timor-Leste, Papua New Guinea, and the Solomon Islands. The tropical waters of the Coral Triangle are among the most biologically diverse – and environmentally vulnerable – regions of the world. The Coral Triangle’s coral reefs, mangrove forests, and seagrass beds are home to vast numbers of fish, sharks and rays, as well as sea turtles and marine mammals.

Building capacity to better attend to the development needs in aquatic agricultural systems

Fisheries, agriculture and forestry play a critical role in supporting the livelihoods of many communities in the Philippines. The government and the development community recognize the potential of aquatic agricultural systems  to reduce poverty; however, a clearer understanding of the complexities of these systems and the communities who depend on them is needed to harness their full value. In response to this need, the Aquatic Agriculture Systems Capacity Building Project aims to enhance the capacities of the Bureau of Agricultural Research (BAR) and Philippine research partners in understanding aquatic agricultural systems  and their development challenges.
 

Selecting the best tilapia strain to maximize productivity

The Philippines derives substantial benefits from its aquatic and fisheries resources. The contribution to the country’s total fish production from aquaculture has consistently increased, outpacing growth in both the small-scale and commercial fishery sectors.
 

Partnerships

CGIAR is only one of many organizations engaged in aquatic agricultural systems. Other research, development and policy organizations spend hundreds of millions of dollars annually to improve the lives of people who depend upon these systems.

Our Research

CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems research is designed to improve the wellbeing of people dependent on aquatic agricultural systems.

Our Approach

The complexity and diversity of communities that rely on aquatic agricultural systems means that there can be no single blueprint solution to the challenges they face.

 

Where We Work

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems is initially focusing on three major types of Aquatic Agricultural Systems:

 

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