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Sub Saharan Africa

Assessing the Impacts of Natural Resource Management and Policy Research in Development Programs

After decades of stagnation, global investment in agricultural research in pursuit of poverty reduction is on the rise. Developed nations are again looking to the many dimensions of agriculture, including forestry and fisheries, to help meet development goals (particularly the Millennium Development Goals) and accelerate progress. But, with increasing investment, there is also an increasing focus on the need for better outcomes and greater impacts from those investments.
 

Partnerships

CGIAR is only one of many organizations engaged in aquatic agricultural systems. Other research, development and policy organizations spend hundreds of millions of dollars annually to improve the lives of people who depend upon these systems.

Our Research

CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems research is designed to improve the wellbeing of people dependent on aquatic agricultural systems.

Our Approach

The complexity and diversity of communities that rely on aquatic agricultural systems means that there can be no single blueprint solution to the challenges they face.

 

Where We Work

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems is initially focusing on three major types of Aquatic Agricultural Systems:

 

Sub-Saharan Fish Trade and Nutrition in a Changing Climate

There is an increasing ‘fish gap’ in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where fish supplies have failed to keep pace with the region’s growing demand. Despite the high dependence on fish for nutrition in much of the region, consumption is currently half the global average and declining.
 
In SSA, as in many other regions globally, marine and inland capture fisheries resources are stagnating or decreasing, largely due to environmental or ecosystem changes and over-exploitation. Climate change is already altering the distribution of fish stocks and rainfall patterns upon which these fisheries depend. At the same time, globalization has favoured developing country exports of high-value fish.
 
 

Improved value chains


Fish Market, Cambodia
 
As a research organization dedicated to helping achieve development impact we generate and synthesize new knowledge which we then share and help apply. One of the key research questions that we address is: “How can we improve input and output value chains to increase the development impact of aquaculture and fisheries?”
 
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