In Timor-Leste, reef fish stocks are dwindling, increasing the pressure faced by fishing-dependent households. Inshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) are helping combat this problem, explains WorldFish Senior Scientist David Mills, by increasing oceanic fish supply and protecting vital reefs.

Following the the 2004 tsunami many in Aceh, Indonesia are rebuilding their lives with the help of aquaculture. WorldFish works with partners including Ecohub, the producer of this video, to champion small scale aquaculture providing social and economic protection for many affected communities.  

Aquaculture is increasingly recognized for its real and potential role in improving income, nutrition and overall food security in developing countries. But a recent WorldFish study has found that the distribution of these benefits to the poor and marginalized is influenced by socio-cultural dynamics, such as gender, race or ethnicity. In this edition of the WorldFish podcast, we are joined by Senior Scientist Jharendu Pant and Research Analyst Surendran Rajaratnam to discuss why that's the case.

In Cambodia, small fish are abundant in rice field fisheries and are an important part of a healthy diet. Small fish provide micronutrients such as vitamin A, zinc, iron and calcium that are needed for cognitive and physical development, especially in children. 

In Bangladesh, around 60% of the population have inadequate intake of vitamin A, which is needed for normal vision, reproduction and a good immune system. A new WorldFish study finds that a long-term commitment to the farming of mola, a small indigenous fish species, could improve the vitamin A intake of the 98% of Bangladeshis who eat fish and save 3,000 lives over an 11-year period. In this edition of the WorldFish podcast, we are joined by WorldFish Senior Scientist, Dr. Shakuntala Thilsted, to discuss this significant finding.

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