The USAID-funded Aquaculture for Income and Nutrition (AIN) project aims to improve household income and nutrition and create employment opportunities through investments in aquaculture, including fish production.

Community members and leaders in the coastal districts of Atauro and Batugade in Timor-Leste learn how to protect their livelihoods against climate change by using community-based adaptation processes.


The traditional diet in Solomon Islands used to consist of fish and locally grown vegetables. However, this has changed in recent decades with today’s diet characterized by large amounts of carbohydrate staples and a heavily reliance on imported, processed food. 

More than 80% of Solomon Islanders live in coastal communities, where fisheries and marine resources are critical sources of food, nutrition and income. To replenish dwindling fish stocks and ensure plentiful supplies for future generations, communities are developing fisheries management plans to control the use of marine resources.

Coastal communities in Malaita, Solomon Islands are leading training workshops to teach participants how to replant mangroves and corals. These critical ecosystems provide breeding grounds and habitats for marine fish and other aquatic animals that support the livelihoods of thousands of subsistence fishers and their families.