Women's traditional fishery and alternative aquatic resource livelihood strategies in the Southern Cameroonian Rainforest

To inform the development of alternative livelihoods, the women's traditional alok fishery in the Campo-Ma'an National Park and buffer zone of southern Cameroon were studied over 15 months. Participatory rural appraisal was used to characterise livelihood strategies among 45 households. Thirty-three cultured crops, nine farmed animal species and 65 non-timber forest products, including 31 bushmeat species are cultivated in, or harvested from, the forest. Transport is a major impediment to commercial trade of all local products.

Vulnerability and resilience of remote rural communities to shocks and global changes: empirical analysis from Solomon Islands

Successful management of socio-ecological systems not only requires the development and field-testing of robust and measurable indices of vulnerability and resilience but also improved understanding of the contextual factors that influence societal capacity to adapt to change. We present the results of an analysis conducted in three coastal communities in Solomon Islands.

A comparison of communal and separate rearing of families in selective breeding of common carp (Cyprinus carpio): Responses to selection

The genetic response in growth traits in a selection program for increased harvest weight in a common carp population in Vietnam is reported. A base population (G0) was established from six carp stocks using single pair mating. Selection was based on high breeding values for body weight at harvest, with a corresponding control group selected on average breeding values of the population.

Assessing adaptation options for climate change: A guide for coastal communities in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific. 2. Climate analysis

This brochure is part of a series that collectively detail how a community-based assessment of climate change was used in partnership with coastal communities and provincial and national-level stakeholders in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands. The assessment contains four distinct, but related, steps focused on supporting community-level decision-making for adaptation through a series of participatory action research activities. Each brochure in this series details a specific activity in the four-step assessment.

Understanding livelihoods dependent on inland fisheries in Bangladesh and Southeast Asia: Vietnam summary report

This is one of the four countries reports which provides an assessment of the livelihoods strategies of the poor people dependent on inland fisheries in Vietnam. The project aimed to characterise the poor, identify their dependence upon aquatic resources, the nature and status of those resources, and their vulnerabilities in relation to loss or mismanagement. Constraints and possible research priorities have been identified through consultations with poor fishers and other aquatic resource users, and with other organizations. Fisheries resource status has been summarized.

Understanding livelihoods dependent on inland fisheries in Bangladesh and Southeast Asia: Vietnam country status report

Information on fisheries resources in Bangladesh and S.E. Asia is fragmented and has not taken account of poor people and their livelihoods. Research has been supply-led, resulting in limited uptake and gains for the non-poor. Often decisions are based on national level priorities, overlooking the needs of local people, especially the poor, and thus posing a severe threat to local livelihood assets including fisheries.

Traditional fisheries development in the Philippines.

Development programmes aimed at raising income levels of the half-million Philippine traditional municipal fishermen have emphasized production-oriented projects designed to up-grade vessels and gear. Review of recent biological, technical, and socio-economic research provides evidence that technology-based efforts have generally not been successful, and that the coastal resources fished by municipal fishermen are not as extensive as previously supposed.

Strengthening the contribution of aquaculture to food and nutrition security: The potential of a vitamin A-rich, small fish in Bangladesh

Since 1961, global per capita fish consumption has nearly doubled. Much of the increase has been due to aquaculture. Bangladesh, the world’s eighth largest fish producing country, has been part of this transformation. Despite having vitamin A supplementation and fortification programs, the prevalence of inadequate vitamin A intake (IVAI) in Bangladesh is very high, estimated to be 60%. The promotion of a small indigenous fish, high in vitamin A- mola carplet - offers a promising food-based approach to improving vitamin A status of the 98% of Bangladeshis who eat fish.

Envisioning possible futures for fish production in Indonesia

This report summarizes the results of a systematic effort to explore possible futures for aquaculture and fisheries in Indonesia. The work described is part of a larger effort that seeks to develop a shared vision for the sectors that 1) aligns public and private investments to foster growth and economic sustainability; 2) reduces environmental impacts and improves efficiency; 3) increases access by small and medium enterprises to the financial and technical assistance necessary to transition to more sustainable practices.


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