Is community-based fisheries management realising multiple objectives? Examining evidence from the literature

Community-based and co-management approaches are key strategies for small-scale fisheries management. The expansion of these approaches is particularly apparent in the Pacific, where communities rely heavily on small-scale fisheries and concerns about sustainability are increasing. Many community-based management initiatives are recognised within a regional practitioner’s network referred to as the Locally Managed Marine Area (LMMA) network.

Vulnerability of coastal livelihoods to shrimp farming: Insights from Mozambique

Millions of people around the world depend on shrimp aquaculture for their livelihoods. Yet, the phenomenal growth of shrimp farming has often given rise to considerable environmental and social damage. This article examines the impacts of commercial, export-oriented shrimp aquaculture on local livelihood vulnerability by comparing the exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity of shrimp farm employees with non-farm employees in rural Mozambique.

Social dimensions of local fisheries co-management in the Coral Triangle

The challenge to manage coastal resources within Asia-Pacific's Coral Triangle has gained global attention. Co-management is promoted as a key strategy to address this challenge. Contemporary community-based co-management often leads to ‘hybridization’ between local (customary) practices, and science-based management and conservation. However, the form of this hybrid has rarely been critically analysed. This paper presents examples of co-management practices in eastern Indonesia and Solomon Islands, focusing in particular on area closures.

A higher level classification of all living organisms

The authors present a consensus classification of life to embrace the more than 1.6 million species already provided by more than 3,000 taxonomists’ expert opinions in a unified and coherent, hierarchically ranked system known as the Catalogue of Life (CoL). The intent of this collaborative effort is to provide a hierarchical classification serving not only the needs of the CoL’s database providers but also the diverse public-domain user community, most of whom are familiar with the Linnaean conceptual system of ordering taxon relationships.

Retrieving taxa names from large biodiversity data collections using a flexible matching workflow

In the domain of biological classification there are several taxon name matching services that can search for a species scientific name in a large collection of taxonomic names. Many of these services are available online, and many others run on computers of individual scientists. While these systems may work very well, most suffer from the fact that the list of names used as a reference, and the criteria to decide on a match, are hard-coded in the engine that performs the name matching.

Orange sweet potato farming technology (Bangla)

Orange sweet potato roots and leaves are rich in vitamins and energy. They are valuable source of micronutrients particularly vitamins A, B and C. Combining orange sweet potato with other foods such as nutrient-rich small fish increases dietary diversity and improves the nutritional value of family meals. This leaflet outlines the methods used in growing orange sweet potato in Bangladesh, where 56% of the population do not meet their vitamin A requirements through their diet.

Year 1 operational report: Improving employment and income through development of Egypt’s aquaculture sector (IEIDEAS) project

Implementation of the SDC funded project ‘Improving Employment and Income through Development of Egypt’s Aquaculture Sector’ commenced on 1st December 2011 and will continue until late 2014. This report summarizes the results of the first 10 months until 30th September 2012. The project was based on a value chain analysis carried out by WorldFish in September 2011. The information in the VCA acts as the baseline for the main project parameters.

Wetlands

After commencing with a summary of the current status, importance and productivity of natural wetlands, the chapter reviews the contribution of wetland ecological functions to sustaining vital ecosystem services. Wetlands are vulnerable to a range of anthropogenic pressures, notably land use change, disruption to regional hydrological regimes as a result of abstraction and impoundment, pollution and excessive nutrient loading, the introduction of invasive species and overexploitation of biomass, plants and animals.

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