Good governance of rice field fishery management

Rice field fisheries refer to the capture of wild fish and other aquatic animals from flooded rice field agroecosystems and their supporting infrastructure, such as canals, channels, streams and other bodies of water. Central to maintaining fish productivity in rice fields is a designated conservation area known as a community fish refuge (CFR) that connects to rice fields to form an area known as the zone of influence.

Performance of the Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia (GIFT) strain over ten generations of selection in Malaysia

A selection programme using Best Linear Unbiased Prediction (BLUP) method for the estimation of genetic merit was implemented by the Department of Fisheries Malaysia (DOF) in collaboration with the WorldFish Centre. This collaborative programme provided opportunities for further improvement of the GIFT strain in Malaysia. The overall aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of GIFT strain during the long-term selection programme in Malaysia.

Vertical agriculture: Suspended horticulture in towers

The farmers of Bangladesh face many challenges associated with climate change and increases in population. Rising salinity, waterlogging, flooding and storm surges, coupled with a growing population that is expected to reach 250 million people by the year 2050, have resulted in a decrease in cultivable land for vegetable production. This brief descirbes how vertical agriculture can address the loss of cultivable land by maximizing the space around households and suspending horticulture production along trees, houses and bamboo structures.

Fish ring microhabitats: Resilience in rice field fisheries

A habitat is the environment where species such as fish live, feed and breed. A small, specialized area of a habitat (a microhabitat) can be created and managed as a way to attract and encourage a species to use the environment. These microhabitats help maintain the biodiversity of ecosystems, which in turn support livelihood activities and the production of food. This brief describes the use of fish ring microhabitat developed by WorldFish for use in rice fields in Bangladesh and its benefit.

Feed resources vis-à-vis livestock and fish productivity in a changing climate

Animal source food production globally already faces increasing pressure because of negative environmental implications, particularly because of greenhouse gas emissions. As livestock and aquaculture are important sources of livelihood, it is necessary to find suitable solutions to convert these industries into economically viable enterprises, while reducing the ill effects of global warming. The most evident and important effects of climate change on livestock production will be mediated through changes in feed resources.

Exploring the impact of farmer-led research supported by civil society organisations

This paper synthesises the main findings about the impacts of a wide range of farmer-led research initiatives in terms of food security, ecological sustainability, economic empowerment, gender relations, local capacity to innovate and influence on ARD institutions. It then draws lessons for future partnerships between formal and informal ARD actors who are seeking common goals in serving smallholder communities.

Understanding leadership in the environmental sciences

Leadership is often assumed, intuitively, to be an important driver of sustainable development. To understand how leadership is conceptualized and analyzed in the environmental sciences and to discover what this research says about leadership outcomes, we conducted a review of environmental leadership research over the last 10 years. We found that much of the environmental leadership literature focuses on a few key individuals and desirable leadership competencies.

Social dimensions of local fisheries co-management in the Coral Triangle

The challenge to manage coastal resources within Asia-Pacific's Coral Triangle has gained global attention. Co-management is promoted as a key strategy to address this challenge. Contemporary community-based co-management often leads to ‘hybridization’ between local (customary) practices, and science-based management and conservation. However, the form of this hybrid has rarely been critically analysed. This paper presents examples of co-management practices in eastern Indonesia and Solomon Islands, focusing in particular on area closures.

A higher level classification of all living organisms

The authors present a consensus classification of life to embrace the more than 1.6 million species already provided by more than 3,000 taxonomists’ expert opinions in a unified and coherent, hierarchically ranked system known as the Catalogue of Life (CoL). The intent of this collaborative effort is to provide a hierarchical classification serving not only the needs of the CoL’s database providers but also the diverse public-domain user community, most of whom are familiar with the Linnaean conceptual system of ordering taxon relationships.

Echinoderms piggybacking on sea cucumbers: Benign effects on sediment turnover and movement of hosts

Sea cucumbers (Holothuroidea) are known to host ectocommensal animals but echinoderm epibionts have never been reported nor their effects on hosts appraised quantitatively. At one location in New Caledonia, we found a high number of ophiuroids (Ophiothela cf. danae) and synaptid sea cucumbers (Synaptula media and Synaptula sp.) living on the bumpy external body wall of sea cucumbers, Stichopus herrmanni.

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