Is community-based fisheries management realising multiple objectives? Examining evidence from the literature

Community-based and co-management approaches are key strategies for small-scale fisheries management. The expansion of these approaches is particularly apparent in the Pacific, where communities rely heavily on small-scale fisheries and concerns about sustainability are increasing. Many community-based management initiatives are recognised within a regional practitioner’s network referred to as the Locally Managed Marine Area (LMMA) network.

Improving diets with wild and cultivated biodiversity from across the landscape

This paper examines the literature on how biodiversity contributes to improved and diversified diets in developing countries. We assess the current state of evidence on how wild and cultivated biodiversity in all forms is related to healthy diets and nutrition, and examine how economic factors, knowledge and social norms interact with availability of biodiversity to influence both production and consumption choices.

Orange sweet potato farming technology (Bangla)

Orange sweet potato roots and leaves are rich in vitamins and energy. They are valuable source of micronutrients particularly vitamins A, B and C. Combining orange sweet potato with other foods such as nutrient-rich small fish increases dietary diversity and improves the nutritional value of family meals. This leaflet outlines the methods used in growing orange sweet potato in Bangladesh, where 56% of the population do not meet their vitamin A requirements through their diet.

Year 1 operational report: Improving employment and income through development of Egypt’s aquaculture sector (IEIDEAS) project

Implementation of the SDC funded project ‘Improving Employment and Income through Development of Egypt’s Aquaculture Sector’ commenced on 1st December 2011 and will continue until late 2014. This report summarizes the results of the first 10 months until 30th September 2012. The project was based on a value chain analysis carried out by WorldFish in September 2011. The information in the VCA acts as the baseline for the main project parameters.

Wetland agroecosystems

Commencing with a summary of the current status, importance and productivity of natural wetlands the contribution of wetland ecological functions to sustaining vital ecosystem services is then reviewed. Provisioning services, notably fish and water for irrigation or domestic and industrial purposes constitute important benefits derived by humanity from wetlands, whilst recognition is growing that supporting, regulating and cultural services supported by wetlands are critical for sustaining social-economic systems and ensuring human well-being.

Water quality research or water quality checking: proposed guidelines

A simple plan is outlined to assist in the design of water quality research and monitoring programmes at aquacultureresearch stations. Before monitoring any programme, a decision on the goals of the aquaculture research to be performed is crucial to planning; the plan follows two major pathways--fish yield parameters-water quality checkingprogramme; and, water quality parameters/water quality research programme.

Vulnerability of mangroves, seagrasses and intertidal flats in the tropical Pacific to climate change

Mangroves and seagrasses are of special interest to coastal fisheries worldwide because of the role they play in providing nursery areas for commonly harvested fish and invertebrates. Although the ecology of fish and invertebrates associated with mangroves and seagrasses in the tropical Pacific is not well understood compared with other parts of the world, the connectivity among mangroves, seagrasses, intertidal flats and coral reefs indicates that mangroves and seagrasses throughout the region provide a similar function to such habitats elsewhere.

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