Good governance of rice field fishery management

Rice field fisheries refer to the capture of wild fish and other aquatic animals from flooded rice field agroecosystems and their supporting infrastructure, such as canals, channels, streams and other bodies of water. Central to maintaining fish productivity in rice fields is a designated conservation area known as a community fish refuge (CFR) that connects to rice fields to form an area known as the zone of influence.

Vertical agriculture: Suspended horticulture in towers

The farmers of Bangladesh face many challenges associated with climate change and increases in population. Rising salinity, waterlogging, flooding and storm surges, coupled with a growing population that is expected to reach 250 million people by the year 2050, have resulted in a decrease in cultivable land for vegetable production. This brief descirbes how vertical agriculture can address the loss of cultivable land by maximizing the space around households and suspending horticulture production along trees, houses and bamboo structures.

Rethinking environmental leadership: The social construction of leaders and leadership in discourses of ecological crisis, development, and conservation

Leadership is heralded as being critical to addressing the “crisis of governance” facing the Earth's natural systems. While political, economic, and corporate discourses of leadership have been widely and critically interrogated, narratives of environmental leadership remain relatively neglected in the academic literature. The aims of this paper are twofold. First, to highlight the centrality and importance of environmental science's construction and mobilization of leadership discourse.

Is community-based fisheries management realising multiple objectives? Examining evidence from the literature

Community-based and co-management approaches are key strategies for small-scale fisheries management. The expansion of these approaches is particularly apparent in the Pacific, where communities rely heavily on small-scale fisheries and concerns about sustainability are increasing. Many community-based management initiatives are recognised within a regional practitioner’s network referred to as the Locally Managed Marine Area (LMMA) network.

Cost-benefit studies of natural resource management in Southeast Asia

This book applies cost-benefit analysis techniques in the management of environment and natural resources in developing countries of the Southeast Asian region and presents a compendium of studies conducted by researchers supported by the Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia (EEPSEA). It emphasizes the close relationship between the environment and natural resources and economic development in such countries, addressing a wide range of problems that can be understood using economic evaluation techniques.

Understanding leadership in the environmental sciences

Leadership is often assumed, intuitively, to be an important driver of sustainable development. To understand how leadership is conceptualized and analyzed in the environmental sciences and to discover what this research says about leadership outcomes, we conducted a review of environmental leadership research over the last 10 years. We found that much of the environmental leadership literature focuses on a few key individuals and desirable leadership competencies.

Social dimensions of local fisheries co-management in the Coral Triangle

The challenge to manage coastal resources within Asia-Pacific's Coral Triangle has gained global attention. Co-management is promoted as a key strategy to address this challenge. Contemporary community-based co-management often leads to ‘hybridization’ between local (customary) practices, and science-based management and conservation. However, the form of this hybrid has rarely been critically analysed. This paper presents examples of co-management practices in eastern Indonesia and Solomon Islands, focusing in particular on area closures.

Improving diets with wild and cultivated biodiversity from across the landscape

This paper examines the literature on how biodiversity contributes to improved and diversified diets in developing countries. We assess the current state of evidence on how wild and cultivated biodiversity in all forms is related to healthy diets and nutrition, and examine how economic factors, knowledge and social norms interact with availability of biodiversity to influence both production and consumption choices.

WorldFish message guide. Version 2

The WorldFish message guide has been created to standardize and unify our messaging about how we describe our organization and our work. The goal is to create a more unified and stronger brand. All WorldFish staff and consultants are encouraged to use this guide when drafting reports, stories or other publications or when preparing for presentations.

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