Sustainable intensification in smallholder agriculture: An integrated systems research approach

Sustainable intensification has recently been developed and adopted as a key concept and driver for research and policy in sustainable agriculture. It includes ecological, economic and social dimensions, where food and nutrition security, gender and equity are crucial components. This book describes different aspects of systems research in agriculture in its broadest sense, where the focus is moved from farming systems to livelihoods systems.

Aquatic product consumption patterns and perceptions among the Chinese middle class

The Chinese market for aquatic products is the largest in the world, and growing rapidly. An increasingly large proportion of Chinese aquatic product consumption is coming from imported sources, making the market of high significance not only for stakeholders in China, but from around the world. Yet little is understood about the key characteristics of this market. In this paper we surveyed 300 middle-class urban consumers of aquatic products in Beijing and Shanghai about patterns of aquatic product consumption and attitudes towards sustainability.

Can community-based adaptation increase resilience

A central claim of community-based adaptation (CBA) is that it increases resilience. Yet, the concept of resilience is treated inconsistently in CBA, obscuring discussion of the limitations and benefits of resilience thinking and undermining evaluation of resilience outcomes in target communities. This paper examines different participatory assessment activities carried out as part of CBA case studies in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands.

A Manual for improving fish production in Northern Zambia through integrated farming systems

This manual was written as part of the Integrated Research in Development for Improved Livelihoods Programme in Northern Province, Zambia (IRDLP) and is primarily intended for extension agents to use with smallholder farmers engaged in semi-intensive fish farming in Northern Zambia. The IRDLP is an Irish Aid-funded project implemented by WorldFish, Harvest Plus and the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).

Factors determining the productivity of mola carplet (Amblypharyngodon mola, Hamilton, 1822) in carp polyculture systems in Barisal district of Bangladesh

Production of the mola carplet (Amblypharyngodon mola), a small vitamin A rich fish, has the potential to reduce human malnutrition in Bangladesh. However, although efforts have been made to promote mola culture, the factors affecting its production are poorly understood. Therefore, this study was undertaken to identify factors contributing to mola productivity in polyculture systems. The study indicates that application of appropriate inputs could be considered to maximize production of mola in future projects attempting to promote its culture.

Potential for transformation

In April 2016, at the Pyin Oo Lwin workshop, Myanmar’s leading institutions, researchers and practitioners in fisheries and aquaculture came together with international experts to support the new government in finding the path that would best fulfill the potential of the fisheries and aquaculture sectors.

Evaluation of production performance and profitability of hybrid red tilapia and genetically improved farmed tilapia (GIFT) strains in the carbon/nitrogen controlled periphyton-based (C/N- CP) on-farm prawn culture system in Bangladesh

Bangladesh is one of the most suitable countries in the world for freshwater prawn farming because of its subtropical climate and vast water resources favoring an ideal condition for prawn production. Several recent developments of freshwater prawn farming have been found promising to improve the productivity and sustainability of pond aquaculture production. (1) control of C/N ratio (2) development of periphyton using substrates (3) fish driven re-suspension and (4) combination of C:N ratio, periphyton substrates and fish driven approaches in freshwater ponds.

Hatchery technologies for Nile tilapia and African catfish training program

The hatchery technologies for Nile tilapia and African catfish training is a 5-day course designed for aquaculture hatchery and farm operators and managers, researchers, technicians, and extension workers. It provides hands-on training in modern aquaculture research and management techniques, especially in relation to tilapia and African catfish. The course includes the latest information on production methods shown to be reliable in the field, demonstrates updated technology for mass production of fish seed, and covers farming practices for different farming conditions.

The evolution of aquatic agricultural systems in Southwest Bangladesh in response to salinity and other drivers of change

Aquatic agricultural systems (AAS) in coastal Southwest Bangladesh have evolved in response to a number of stimuli and constraints including improving market access, technological change, and salinization. Farming systems in the region are highly dynamic, and are characterized by the integration of varying combinations of freshwater prawns, rice, fish, vegetables, and brackish water shrimp.


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