A Manual for improving fish production in Northern Zambia through integrated farming systems

This manual was written as part of the Integrated Research in Development for Improved Livelihoods Programme in Northern Province, Zambia (IRDLP) and is primarily intended for extension agents to use with smallholder farmers engaged in semi-intensive fish farming in Northern Zambia. The IRDLP is an Irish Aid-funded project implemented by WorldFish, Harvest Plus and the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).

Factors determining the productivity of mola carplet (Amblypharyngodon mola, Hamilton, 1822) in carp polyculture systems in Barisal district of Bangladesh

Production of the mola carplet (Amblypharyngodon mola), a small vitamin A rich fish, has the potential to reduce human malnutrition in Bangladesh. However, although efforts have been made to promote mola culture, the factors affecting its production are poorly understood. Therefore, this study was undertaken to identify factors contributing to mola productivity in polyculture systems. The study indicates that application of appropriate inputs could be considered to maximize production of mola in future projects attempting to promote its culture.

The SILC+GTA facilitation manual: the Savings and Internal Lending Communities plus Gender-Transformative Approach (SILC+GTA)

The purpose of integrating a gender-transformative perspective into savings and internal lending communities (SILC) is to engage men in SILC group participation and support, and to improve gender relations and decision-making processes for enhanced group performance and financial investments. Savings-group programs have historically targeted women, as there is a long-standing assumption that improving women’s access to finance will lead to increases in women’s empowerment.

Impact of the community-based fish culture system on expenditure and inequality: Evidence from Bangladesh

This study investigated the impact of a Community-based Fish Culture (CBFC) system on household expenditure and how expenditure inequality in the fish-producing communities has changed due to involvement in the CBFC system. Six floodplains, comprising three project sites and three controls, were chosen from three river basin areas of Bangladesh; data for this study were collected for a period of 3 yr. A propensity score matching method was used to evaluate the impact of CBFC on household expenditure; while a Gini coefficient and Gini decomposition were used to estimate inequality.

Hatchery technologies for Nile tilapia and African catfish training program

The hatchery technologies for Nile tilapia and African catfish training is a 5-day course designed for aquaculture hatchery and farm operators and managers, researchers, technicians, and extension workers. It provides hands-on training in modern aquaculture research and management techniques, especially in relation to tilapia and African catfish. The course includes the latest information on production methods shown to be reliable in the field, demonstrates updated technology for mass production of fish seed, and covers farming practices for different farming conditions.

Suitability of different fish species for cultivation in integrated floating cage aquageoponics system (IFCAS) in Bangladesh

In rural areas of Bangladesh, the vast majority of households own only small or large shaded homestead ponds located next to their dwellings and the pond dikes are covered with large timber trees, a situation where it is quite difficult to produce fish and vegetables on the dikes. Incorporation of appropriate technologies however, can successfully utilize homestead ponds for commercial fish farming that can meet growing protein and nutritional demand.

Myanmar fisheries: Overview (Burmese version)

The Myanmar Fishery Partnership (MFP) is a new initiative being established to assist the Myanmar government in strengthening effective collaboration for the sustainable development of Myanmar’s fisheries and aquaculture sector. Four policy briefs have been developed by the Myanmar Fisheries Partnership to help the government address the most challenging issues facing fisheries in Myanmar.

Myanmar fisheries: Aquaculture (Burmese version)

Fish is an extremely important component of the Myanmar diet, and demand is growing quickly as the country urbanizes and incomes rise. Aquaculture is ideally placed to meet this demand, while also raising farm incomes and creating employment. This brief identifies three sets of policy options that could help to unlock the full potential of aquaculture’s contributions to rural growth and national food supply.

Myanmar fisheries: Offshore fisheries

Myanmar’s offshore fish stocks have been depleted by up to 80% since 1979, exposing Myanmar’s people to significant economic, food security, nutrition and environmental risks. This ecosystem decline has been driven by out-dated and weak laws and policies and by inadequate management and institutional capacity. Investment in protecting and restoring fish stocks, ecosystems and habitats is required.

Myanmar fisheries: Inshore fisheries

Myanmar’s inshore fisheries support the livelihoods of millions of Myanmar citizens living in coastal areas. However, in recent years, the capacity of these fisheries to support viable livelihoods and contribute significantly to local economies has come under threat. This policy brief sets out five priority areas that need immediate attention if coastal resources are to recover to more productive levels and if fisher communities are to continue to benefit from these resources.

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