A social and gender analysis of Northern Province, Zambia: Qualitative evidence that supports the use of a gender transformative approach

A qualitative social and gender analysis was carried out in June 2015 in Luwingu and Mbala Districts in Northern Province, Zambia. The research explored the norms and power relations at various institutional levels that constrain certain social groups from benefiting from programmatic investments aimed at improving livelihoods, health status, and food and nutrition security within the Irish Aid Local Development Programme (IALDP).

Improving Employment and Income through Development of Egypt’s Aquaculture Sector (IEIDEAS) project

The Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC)-funded Improving Employment and Income through Development of Egypt’s Aquaculture Sector (IEIDEAS) project was implemented by WorldFish in partnership with CARE Egypt and the Egyptian Ministry of Agriculture and Land Reclamation from 2011 to 2014 and later extended to November 2015. The project focused on four governorates with significant aquaculture production (Kafr El Sheikh, Behera, Sharkia and Fayoum) and one governorate (El Mineya), where aquaculture was a new activity.

Coalitions to achieve gender equality at scale: Gender development and coordinating subcommittees and networks as drivers of change in Zambia

Gender inequality affects development outcomes, and it results in sub-optimal returns to development investments. Formal structures have been put in place to address these issues, but their effectiveness is hampered by a number of institutional constraints. This brief summarizes the findings of a scoping study conducted to understand the strengths and areas of growth of the gender development and coordinating subcommittees at the district and provincial levels in western Zambia, and of the gender networks at the national level.

Distribution, migrations and breeding of Hilsa (Tenualosa ilisha) in the Ayeyarwady system in Myanmar

Hilsa (Tenualosa ilisha) is a major fishery resource in the Bay of Bengal. In order to ensure the sustainability of this resource, through effective management measures, information is required on its distribution patterns, migration routes and breeding sites. This study fills these knowledge gaps in Myanmar’s Ayeyarwady Delta. The findings are based on systematic gathering of local ecological knowledge among experienced fishers in thirty-two sites.

Communities and change in the anthropocene: understanding social-ecological vulnerability and planning adaptations to multiple interacting exposures

The majority of vulnerability and adaptation scholarship, policies and programs focus exclusively on climate change or global environmental change. Yet, individuals, communities and sectors experience a broad array of multi-scalar and multi-temporal, social, political, economic and environmental changes to which they are vulnerable and must adapt.

Shrimp, prawn and the political economy of social wellbeing in rural Bangladesh

Wellbeing is gaining prominence in international development discourse as an alternative means of conceptualising and assessing progress against human development goals. This paper operationalizes the concept of social wellbeing (comprised of interlinked material, subjective and relational dimensions) as a framework for understanding the effects of agrarian change, as experienced by inhabitants of two villages in rural Southwest Bangladesh.

Futures of inland aquatic agricultural systems and implications for fish agri-food systems in southern Africa

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) is collaborating with partners to develop and implement a foresight-based engagement with diverse stakeholders linked to aquatic agricultural systems. The program’s aim is to understand the implications of current drivers of change for fish agri-food systems, and consequently food and nutrition security, in Africa, Asia and the Pacific.

Menjelajahi masa depan perikanan budidaya Indonesia (Exploring Indonesian aquaculture futures)

Aquaculture is the fastest-growing food production sector globally, with production projected to double within the next 15–20 years. Future growth of aquaculture is essential to providing sustainable supplies of fish in national, regional and global fish food systems; creating jobs; and maintaining fish at affordable levels for resource-poor consumers. To ensure that the anticipated growth of aquaculture remains both economically and ecologically sustainable, we need to better understand the likely patterns of growth, as well as the opportunities and challenges, that these trends present.

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