Community based fish culture in the public and private floodplains of Bangladesh

Seasonal floodplains under private and public ownership in the Indo-Ganges river basin provide food and income for millions of people in Bangladesh. This research aimed to understand the complex institutional relations that govern ownership, access, and control of the floodplains under Community Based Fish Culture (CBFC) to increase fish production and overall livelihoods of the poor.

Scaling out enhanced floodplain productivity by poor communities: aquaculture and fisheries in Bangladesh and eastern India

Rearing fish in seasonal floodplains raises productivity but can adversely affect the poor and the biodiversity of important natural fisheries. Equitable community institutions enable poor rural households to cooperate with landowners and adopt innovative technologies to optimize seasonal floodplain productivity by cultivating fish and/or by conserving natural fish.

A method to estimate the stock recruitment relationship of shrimps

A procedure is proposed by which recruit numbers and parental biomass of shrimps stocks can be derived, given a series of catch per effort data and estimates of a few ancillary variables. In the Gulf of Thailand, shrimp recruitment decreased with decreasing egg production, but increased with decreasing total (mainly fish) standing stock. The net result of these counteracting effects was an overall increase in shrimp recruitment, attributable to a greatly reduced prerecruit mortality.

Growth and survival of olive barb, Puntius sarana (Hamilton 1822) larvae produced with cryopreserved versus fresh sperm

Despite the success in fertilization and hatching of fish eggs with cryopreserved sperm, report on growth and survival of larvae produced from frozen-thawed sperm is inadequate. This study evaluates the applicability of cryopreserved sperm for mass seed production by comparing the growth and survival of a popular food-fish olive barb, Puntius sarana (Hamilton 1822) larvae produced from cryopreserved and fresh sperm.

Assessing adaptation options for climate change: A guide for coastal communities in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific. 3. Impact and adaptation assessment workshop

This brochure is part of a series that collectively detail how a community-based assessment of climate change was used in partnership with coastal communities and provincial and national-level stakeholders in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands. The assessment contains four distinct, but related, steps focused on supporting community-level decision-making for adaptation through a series of participatory action research activities. Each brochure in this series details a specific activity in the four-step assessment.

Managing Aquatic Agricultural Systems to improve nutrition and livelihoods in rural Myanmar (MYNutrition) [Burmese version]

The Managing Aquatic Agricultural Systems to Improve Nutrition and Livelihoods in Rural Myanmar (MYNutrition) project intends to adapt and scale up the successful innovative integrated aquaculture and fisheries/agriculture-nutrition linkages developed under the IFAD-funded Small Fish and Nutrition project in northeast and northwest rural Bangladesh in 2010-2013.

Capturing views of men, women and youth on agricultural biodiversity resources consumed in Barotseland, Zambia

This paper presents data and findings from focus group discussions in study communities selected by the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) in the Western Province of Zambia. The discussions focused on cultivated crops and vegetables collected from open fields and consumed as food.

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