Economic analysis of climate change adaptation strategies in selected coastal areas in Indonesia, Philippines and Vietnam

This report is an account of a cross-country study that covered Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippines. Covering four sites (one each in Indonesia and Vietnam) and two sites in the Philippines, the study documented the impacts of three climate hazards affecting coastal communities, namely typhoon/flooding, coastal erosion and saltwater intrusion. It also analyzed planned adaptation options, which communities and local governments can implement, as well as autonomous responses of households to protect and insure themselves from these hazards.

The WorldFish Center: Malawi

The role of the WorldFish Center is to research and disseminate appropriate aquaculture and fisheries technologies for sustainable agricultural intensification. To achieve these goals the WorldFish Center works in partnership with the government of Malawi. It leverages success by collaborating with both local and overseas academic research organizations, drawing funding from the global development community.

Understanding livelihoods dependent on inland fisheries in Bangladesh and Southeast Asia: Vietnam PRA report

During the period of May to July 2002, An Giang University, in conjunction with the Chau Phu, Thoai Son and Chau Doc District People's Committees, and Can Tho University conducted Participatory Rural Appraisals (PRAs) in four different Provinces. The research findings from this study are presented in this report. The purpose of this exercise was to better understand the livelihoods of people living in rural areas and depending mainly on inland capture fisheries.

A method to estimate the stock recruitment relationship of shrimps

A procedure is proposed by which recruit numbers and parental biomass of shrimps stocks can be derived, given a series of catch per effort data and estimates of a few ancillary variables. In the Gulf of Thailand, shrimp recruitment decreased with decreasing egg production, but increased with decreasing total (mainly fish) standing stock. The net result of these counteracting effects was an overall increase in shrimp recruitment, attributable to a greatly reduced prerecruit mortality.

Growth and survival of olive barb, Puntius sarana (Hamilton 1822) larvae produced with cryopreserved versus fresh sperm

Despite the success in fertilization and hatching of fish eggs with cryopreserved sperm, report on growth and survival of larvae produced from frozen-thawed sperm is inadequate. This study evaluates the applicability of cryopreserved sperm for mass seed production by comparing the growth and survival of a popular food-fish olive barb, Puntius sarana (Hamilton 1822) larvae produced from cryopreserved and fresh sperm.

Assessing adaptation options for climate change: A guide for coastal communities in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific. 3. Impact and adaptation assessment workshop

This brochure is part of a series that collectively detail how a community-based assessment of climate change was used in partnership with coastal communities and provincial and national-level stakeholders in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands. The assessment contains four distinct, but related, steps focused on supporting community-level decision-making for adaptation through a series of participatory action research activities. Each brochure in this series details a specific activity in the four-step assessment.

The WISH pond: Potential for development of aquaculture in northeast Cambodia

In Cambodia, fish provide a major source of animal protein for rural households. Capture fisheries have declined and aquaculture has been identified as playing an important role in food and nutritional security and rural income generation. In 2011, WorldFish, in partnership with the Stung Treng Fishery Administration Cantonment and the Culture and Environment Preservation Association, aimed at improving the uptake of small-scale aquaculture by communities with limited experience in fish culture in Stung Treng Province in northeast Cambodia.

Fish, sediment and dams in the Mekong

The Mekong River is home to the largest inland fishery in the world, which is due in part to its exceptional sediment and nutrient loads. The number of dams in the Basin is expected to increase from 16 in the year 2000 to between 77 and 136 by 2030. These dams retain and accumulate sediments and nutrients in their reservoirs; as such, planned dam development is expected to result in a 60% to 96% reduction in sediment flow to downstream Mekong waters.

STREAMS program brochure

The Sustainable Transformation of Egypt’s Aquaculture Market System The Sustainable Transformation of Egypt’s Aquaculture Market System (STREAMS) project aims to increase production of inexpensive, nutritious and safe fish from sustainable aquaculture systems to help improve the health and nutrition of Egypt’s resource-poor while creating employment and increasing incomes along the aquaculture value chain.

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