Menjelajahi masa depan perikanan budidaya Indonesia (Exploring Indonesian aquaculture futures)

Aquaculture is the fastest-growing food production sector globally, with production projected to double within the next 15–20 years. Future growth of aquaculture is essential to providing sustainable supplies of fish in national, regional and global fish food systems; creating jobs; and maintaining fish at affordable levels for resource-poor consumers. To ensure that the anticipated growth of aquaculture remains both economically and ecologically sustainable, we need to better understand the likely patterns of growth, as well as the opportunities and challenges, that these trends present.

Promoting the sustainable growth of aquaculture in Myanmar to improve food Security and income for communities in the Ayeyarwady Delta and Central Dry Zone (MYFC)

MYFC, a Livelihoods and Food Security Trust Fund (LIFT) funded project, aims to promote sustainable growth of aquaculture in Myanmar. By introducing low cost poly-culture combining small indigenous species of fish with mostly carps, the project intends to increase income, food and nutrition security for resource-poor households in the Ayeyarwady Delta and the central dry zone (CDZ). With a particular focus on women and children, and running over three years (2016-2018), MYFC will target four townships in each area.

Managing Aquatic Agricultural Systems to improve nutrition and livelihoods in rural Myanmar (MYNutrition)

The Managing Aquatic Agricultural Systems to Improve Nutrition and Livelihoods in Rural Myanmar (MYNutrition) project intends to adapt and scale up the successful innovative integrated aquaculture and fisheries/agriculture-nutrition linkages developed under the IFAD-funded Small Fish and Nutrition project in northeast and northwest rural Bangladesh in 2010-2013.

Assessing adaptation options for climate change: A guide for coastal communities in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific. 2. Climate analysis

This brochure is part of a series that collectively detail how a community-based assessment of climate change was used in partnership with coastal communities and provincial and national-level stakeholders in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands. The assessment contains four distinct, but related, steps focused on supporting community-level decision-making for adaptation through a series of participatory action research activities. Each brochure in this series details a specific activity in the four-step assessment.

Aquaculture

Biophysical impacts of aquaculture, with consequences for biodiversity, vary with species and culture systems and include issues such as: nutrient enrichment/removal, chemicals, land use, species introductions, genetic flow to wild populations, disturbance of balance or introduction of pathogen/parasites, consumption of capture fishery resources, energy, and greenhouse gas emissions. Guiding principles, labeling schemes and various tools are needed to analyze performance and conformance.

Traditional fisheries development in the Philippines.

Development programmes aimed at raising income levels of the half-million Philippine traditional municipal fishermen have emphasized production-oriented projects designed to up-grade vessels and gear. Review of recent biological, technical, and socio-economic research provides evidence that technology-based efforts have generally not been successful, and that the coastal resources fished by municipal fishermen are not as extensive as previously supposed.

Length-weight relationships of fishes from tributaries of the Volta River, Ghana: Part II and Conclusion

Slopes and intercepts of length-weight relationships obtained from 37 populations from the rivers Oti, Pru and Black Volta in Ghana were compared using a one way analysis of covariance with fixed effects. Although no significant differences were obtained from this analysis, an ANOVA comparing the magnitudes of mean condition factors (Wx100/SL3) found 9 out of 37 populations significantly different at the 0.05 level. A two-way nested ANOVA using all populations combined, however, did not yield any significant differences between the three rivers.

Genetics of flesh quality in fish

Genetic improvement has led to substantial increase in productivity in farmed animals and in tropical fin fish, this is evident in tilapia. The GIFT (Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia) strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) has been developed by the WorldFish Centre (formerly known as ICLARM), Norwegian Institute of Aquaculture Research and national research partners from Philippines (1988-1998) and from Malaysia (2000- present).

Pages

Subscribe to WorldFish RSS