Boom and bust in Andhra Pradesh: Development and transformation in India's domestic aquaculture value chain

India is the world's second largest producer of farmed freshwater fish. The state of Andhra Pradesh (AP) is by far the most important producer of fish in India. Since the late 1970s, fish culture in AP has undergone a boom (first with Indian major carps, then pangasius), resulting in expansion of pond area to 142,000 ha, and massive increases in inland farmed fish production, to 1.5 million tons. Unregulated growth of carp farming has caused severe environmental conflicts, leading to the demolition of 39,000 ha of ponds by the state.

Aquatic product consumption patterns and perceptions among the Chinese middle class

The Chinese market for aquatic products is the largest in the world, and growing rapidly. An increasingly large proportion of Chinese aquatic product consumption is coming from imported sources, making the market of high significance not only for stakeholders in China, but from around the world. Yet little is understood about the key characteristics of this market. In this paper we surveyed 300 middle-class urban consumers of aquatic products in Beijing and Shanghai about patterns of aquatic product consumption and attitudes towards sustainability.

Aquaculture big numbers

This research project seeks to: provide baseline information on the present status of the aquaculture sector from a human development perspective; identify the types and numbers of people employed by the sector; and explore the role of aquaculture in providing social and economic services at a global level, with a particular emphasis on small-scale stakeholders. The research findings presented here are based on a global synthesis of information from various sources and 9 country case studies in Asia, Africa and Latin America.

Aquaculture and sustainability through integrated resources management

Aquaculture In developing countries can improve the sustainability of small-scale farms provided that It is fully integrated with other enterprises and household activities so as to allow farm families and communities to manage their natural resources effectively. This requires the consideration of pond management and fish husbandry as means to a variety of ends (water storage, soil conservation and fertility, integrated pest management, etc.), not just production of fish.

Tracking nutrient flows in a multi-enterprise farming systems with a mass-balance model (ECOPATH)

Whether grown for sale or for on-farm consumption, vegetables and other crops are often managed as stand-alone, monoculture enterprises. Integrated farming can help improve the nutrient output-input balance sheet and efficiency, not only for each component, but for the whole farm agroecosystem. Quantitative methods that can assist farmers and researchers improve diversified and integrated natural resources management systems are emerging from the agricultural and ecological sciences.

Development of Diversity Arrays Technology markers as a tool for rapid genomic assessment in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

The development of genomic markers is described for Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, using the Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) genotype-by-sequencing platform. A total of 13 215 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and 12 490 silicoDArT (dominant) markers were identified from broodstock of two selective breeding programs [Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia (GIFT) strain from Malaysia and the Abbassa strain from Egypt]. Over 10 000 SNPs were polymorphic in either strain, and 2985 and 3087 showed strain-specific polymorphisms for the GIFT and Abbassa strains respectively.

Pages

Subscribe to WorldFish RSS