Understanding adoption and discontinuance for greater impact

Floodplains are characterized by a period of several months when the land is not available for agriculture and large, open areas are used for fisheries. The enclosed part of these flooded areas can be utilized for fish production aside from naturally occurring self recruited species through a community-based management system. Experiences in the Vietnamese and Cambodian Mekong Delta and Ganges Delta in Bangladesh between 2006 and 2009 highlighted the potential of this model and its limitations.

Trends in the farming of the snakeskin gourami (Trichogaster pectoralis) in Thailand.

The production of snakeskin gourami (Trichogaster pectoralis) from wild stocks and traditional culture systems has been declining in central Thailand, although they are on the increase in modern culture practices adopted in some provinces. Net yields of T. pectoralis in traditional systems are about a third of those in modern systems. The potential of T. pectoralis as a candidate for more intensive waste-fed polyculture appears promising if seed supply constraints can be removed.

Training in fisheries planning and management: the case of the Southern African Development Community nations.

This paper presents an evaluation of the 15-week course on Training in Fisheries Planning and Management being offered at the University of Namibia since 1991. This course includes instruction in fisheries technology, fisheries biology, fisheries law and law of the sea, fisheries economics, fisheries sociology, environment impact assessment, planning and management, the logical framework approach to planning and computer literacy. The participats in the course have rated the various elements in a range of 2.9 to 4.7 out of a maximum of 5 points.

Traditional institutions and their role in the contemporary coastal resource management in the Pacific Islands.

A discussion is presented on the role played by customary marine tenure (CMT) institutions in the regulation of fisheries in the Pacific Ocean Islands. Particular reference is made to the system in operation in Marovo Lagoon, in the Solomon Islands, whereby a number of defined clans control resource use within defined areas of land and sea. It is believed that such systems have considerable capacity for handling and adapting to new circumstances, thereby becoming potentially important tools in the contemporary management of fisheries and of the coastal zone in general.

Trading fish for sex in sub-Saharan Africa

Chris Béné's article "Women and Fish-for-Sex" (FFS) is being highlighted in this issue of id21. The researchers use the example of a small-scale fishing community in the Kafue flats region of Zambia, and review other cases in the world. They demonstrate how economic impoverishment, which is often put forward to explain FFS transactions, is too simplistic to capture the complexity of the FFS phenomenon.

Time recovery for exploited fish populations based on surplus yield models

A new method to estimate the time recovery of exploited population based on M.B. Schaefer's theory is proposed. The parameters used as follows: current population size (alphaP sub( infinity )'), target population level (BetaP sub( infinity )'), and an estimate of population growth rate. The exploitation and survival rates are described and used to obtain a time-recovery isopleth diagram for a range of population size and exploitation rates.

Testing resilience thinking in a poverty context: experience from the Niger River basin

Resilience thinking is an important addition to the range of frameworks and approaches that can be used to understand and manage complex social–ecological systems like small-scale fisheries. However, it is yet to lead to better environmental or development outcomes for fisheries stakeholders in terms of food security, improved livelihoods and ecological sustainability.

Technical guidelines for economic valuation of inland small-scale fisheries in developing countries

These “Technical Guidelines for Economic Valuation of Inland Small-scale Fisheries in Developing Countries” are one of the outputs of the project on “Food security and poverty alleviation through improved valuation and governance of river fisheries in Africa”. The guidelines draw upon research results and experience gained during the course of the project.

Targeting agricultural research and extension for food security and poverty alleviation: a case study of fish farming in Central Cameroon

Over 5 years of participatory on-farm research, market access, profitability, farming systems productivity and economic sustainability were compared on 100 small-scale farms in Central Cameroon. Integration technology based on the use of agricultural by-products as fishpond inputs was the driver for intensification. Over all farms, fishpond productivity increased from 498 kg to 1609 kg fish/ha (2145 kg/ha/yr). During the project period, the number of active fish farmers increased from 15 to 192 (including 55 farms which participated only through information exchange).

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