Social dynamics shaping the diffusion of sustainable aquaculture innovations in the Solomon Island

Sustainably feeding the world’s growing population represents one of our most significant challenges. Aquaculture is well positioned to make contributions towards this challenge. Yet, the translation of aquaculture production innovations into benefits for rural communities is constrained by a limited understanding of the social dynamics that influence the adoption of new agricultural practices. In this paper, we investigate the factors that shape the spread of small-scale tilapia aquaculture through rural Solomon Islands.

The Nutritious pond project

The Nutritious Pond System has now implemented its activities on the ground for a year. The project is a partnership between a research organization (WorldFish), universities (Wageningen University and Can Tho University), private sector firms (Nutreco, Skretting Vietnam, Vemedin) and shrimp farmers to develop a new approach to feeding pond aquaculture. This project Newsletter highlights recent activities and the first results of on-farm pond trials and outputs from fundamental research.

Trials to improve the response of Orechromis niloticus to Aeromonas hydrophila vaccine using immunostimulants (garlic, Echinacea) and probiotics (Organic Green and Vet-Yeast)

Aquaculture is a promising sector of fish industry in the world with about 80 million tones being produced annually. The development of aquaculture faced several constraints; among these are diseases constituting the most limiting factors. Bacterial infections, pose one of the most significant threat to successful fish production throughout the world.

Portable ponds for communities in need

To address the extreme food insecurity of the poor households in Bangladesh, WorldFish has designed a portable small pond which can hold fish in it and at the same time, provide water for horticulture. Trials began in 2014 when these 'WISH' (water and fish) ponds were distributed amongst selected rural 'pond-less' communities and semi-urban landless communities, and tested for integrated aquaculture and horticulture.

Outcome evidencing: A Method for enabling and evaluating Program intervention in complex systems

This article describes the development and use of a rapid evaluation approach to meet program accountability and learning requirements in a research for development program operating in five developing countries. The method identifies clusters of outcomes, both expected and unexpected, happening within areas of change. In a workshop, change agents describe the causal connections within outcome clusters to identify outcome trajectories for subsequent verification.

Individual tenure and commercial management of Myanmar’s inland fish resources

This chapter presents the current state of knowledge on “Inn” fisheries, an important fisheries management regime in Myanmar. The presentation made is based on a comprehensive review of literature, some original research data and the authors’ extended combined experiences working in Myanmar. The chapter starts by revisiting the origin of the “Inn” system, shedding light on the chain of events that led to its generalization under the British occupation.

Getting beneath the surface in program planning, monitoring and evaluation: Learning from use of participatory action research and theory of change in the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems

Many rural poor and marginalized people strive to make a living in social-ecological systems that are characterized by multiple and often inequitable interactions across agents, scale and space. Uncertainty and inequality in such systems require research and development interventions to be adaptive, support learning and to engage with underlying drivers of poverty. Such complexity-aware approaches to planning, monitoring and evaluating development interventions are gaining strength, yet, there is still little empirical evidence of what it takes to implement them in practice.

Conflicts over natural resource scarcity in the aquatic ecosystem of the Lake Chilwa

This paper examines the linkage between resource scarcity and conflict during the 2012 Lake Chilwa water level recession. Ecosystem degradation and resource scarcity negatively affect many poor people dependent on aquatic systems such as river floodplains and wetlands. The need to identify and implement innovative measures to manage the scarce resources in these systems has sometimes resulted in conflicts among the various resource users such as fishers, farmers and political groups.

WorldFish strategy 2017-2022

The WorldFish mission is to strengthen livelihoods and enhance food and nutrition security by improving fisheries and aquaculture. We pursue this through research partnerships focused on helping those who stand to benefit the most—poor producers and consumers, women and children This strategy details the ambitious impact targets we have embraced, which are aligned with the UN Sustainable Development Goals, and charts our course to achieve them.

A synthesis of convergent reflections, tensions and silences in linking gender and global environmental change research

This synthesis article joins the authors of the special issue "Gender perspectives in resilience, vulnerability and adaptation to global environmental change" in a common reflective dialogue about the main contributions of their papers. In sum, here we reflect on links between gender and feminist approaches to research in adaptation and resilience in global environmental change (GEC).

Pages

Subscribe to WorldFish RSS