Contribution of fisheries and aquaculture to food security and poverty reduction: Assessing the current evidence

This paper evaluates the existing evidence of how and to what extent capture fisheries and aquaculture contribute to food security and poverty reduction. In doing so the authors evaluate the quality and scientific rigor of that evidence, identify the key conclusions that emerge from the literature, and assess whether these conclusions are consistent across the sources.

An ecosystem approach to small-scale fisheries through participatory diagnosis in four tropical countries

Participatory diagnosis is an approach to identify, prioritize and mobilise around factors that constrain or enable effective governance and management in small-scale fisheries. Diagnostic frameworks are mostly designed and used for systematic scientific analysis or impact evaluation. Through participation they also have potential to guide contextually informed improvements to management in practice, including transitions to contemporary forms of governance like the ecosystem approach to fisheries (EAF).

Assessing adaptation options for climate change: A guide for coastal communities in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific. 8. Implementation planning

This brochure is part of a series that collectively detail how a community-based assessment of climate change was used in partnership with coastal communities and provincial and national-level stakeholders in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands. The assessment contains four distinct, but related, steps focused on supporting community-level decision-making for adaptation through a series of participatory action research activities. Each brochure in this series details a specific activity in the four-step assessment.

Assessing adaptation options for climate change: A guide for coastal communities in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific. 5. Social network analysis

This brochure is part of a series that collectively detail how a community-based assessment of climate change was used in partnership with coastal communities and provincial and national-level stakeholders in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands. The assessment contains four distinct, but related, steps focused on supporting community-level decision-making for adaptation through a series of participatory action research activities. Each brochure in this series details a specific activity in the four-step assessment.

Livelihoods and fisheries governance in a contemporary Pacific Island setting

Inshore marine resources play an important role in the livelihoods of Pacific Island coastal communities. However, such reliance can be detrimental to inshore marine ecosystems. Understanding the livelihoods of coastal communities is important for devising relevant and effective fisheries management strategies. This study examined livelihood considerations within fisheries governance in a contemporary Pacific Island setting.

Strengthening the role of women in community-based marine resource management: lessons learned from community workshops

Community-based resource management (CBRM) forms an important component of the Solomon Islands Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR) inshore fisheries strategy. The strategy recognises that community-based initiatives will be the engine of sustainable economic development in the inshore marine resource sector. Key activities in the strategy include developing and refining community-based management plans and testing livelihood diversification/supplementation strategies.

Strengthening capacities for research in development in aquatic agricultural systems

The research-in-development (RinD) approach to agricultural research focuses on working closely with communities through multistakeholder engagement to strengthen capacities to design, plan, implement and adapt research in order to improve the lives and livelihoods of the resource-poor living in complex social-ecological systems. The approach requires researchers and implementing partners to learn new skills and build new capacities as they work in multistakeholder teams.

Exploring Indonesian aquaculture futures

Aquaculture is the fastest-growing food production sector globally, with production projected to double within the next 15–20 years. Future growth of aquaculture is essential to providing sustainable supplies of fish in national, regional and global fish food systems; creating jobs; and maintaining fish at affordable levels for resource-poor consumers. To ensure that the anticipated growth of aquaculture remains both economically and ecologically sustainable, we need to better understand the likely patterns of growth, as well as the opportunities and challenges, that these trends present.

Report on progress 1

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (CRP AAS) began operations in July 2011 with an initial focus on establishing the key governance, management and science leadership capacities required for successful delivery. As this has progressed we have also started implementing a first suite of focal country activities, along with work to produce key science outputs to support country roll-out. This first report on progress summarizes the main highlights of our work so far.

Reuse of fish pond sediments as fertilizer for fodder grass production in Bangladesh: Potential for sustainable intensification and improved nutrition

Intensive aquaculture systems (e.g. pangasius farming) make important contributions to food security in developing countries, including Bangladesh, but are associated with a variety of negative environmental impacts, including the discharge of nutrient rich sediments into local ecosystems.

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