A global protocol for monitoring of coral bleaching

Coral bleaching and subsequent mortality represent a major threat to the future health and productivity of coral reefs. However a lack of reliable data on occurrence, severity and other characteristics of bleaching events hampers research on the causes and consequences of this important phenomenon. This handbook describes a global protocol for monitoring coral bleaching events, which addresses this problem and can be used by people with different levels of expertise and resources.

Genetics of flesh quality in fish

Genetic improvement has led to substantial increase in productivity in farmed animals and in tropical fin fish, this is evident in tilapia. The GIFT (Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia) strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) has been developed by the WorldFish Centre (formerly known as ICLARM), Norwegian Institute of Aquaculture Research and national research partners from Philippines (1988-1998) and from Malaysia (2000- present).

Fisheries and HIV/AIDS in Africa: investing in sustainable solutions

The programme is assessing key risk factors among highly vulnerable target groups, including female fish traders, migrant fisher folk and youth, through surveys and par ticipatory qualitative research. Based on insights from this research, programme par tners are piloting business-based interventions that will address some of these risk factors such as lack of services in remote fishing camps and transactional sex in the context of fish marketing. These pilot interventions will generate viable business models and options for wider support to the fisheries sector.

Fish fights over fish rights: managing exit from the fisheries and security implications in Southeast Asia: Philippines case study on conflicts arising from zoning of municipal waters

The general goals of the research of this paper are 1. To develop a broad framework for addressing approaches for reducing overcapacity in the fisheries of Southeast Asia; and 2. To examine where conflicts may arise and to provide plans to ameliorate these conflicts and its role in reducing conflicts and enhancing national and regional security. The research will attempt to meet these broad goals by pursuing the following specific objectives: 1. To describe the socio-economic conditions of fishers in selected areas around the Visayan Sea. 2.

Developments in the breeding of cultured fishes.

The controlled breeding of finfish for culture is reviewed with special refer-ence to recent developments and persistent problems. Freshwater species are at present cultured on a much larger scale than brackishwater and marine species which have potential for aquaculture in arid and semi-arid lands. A reliable supply of fish seed for freshwater farming can usually be produced from captive broodstock whereas coastal aquaculture still depends largely on collection of seed from the wild.

Rice-fish integration for high saline, coastal areas of Bangladesh: Learning from the Challenge Program for Water and Food (CPWF)

The Southwestern coastal zone of Bangladesh is agro-based and one of the world’s most populous, poverty-stricken and food-insecure regions, with high vulnerability to climate change. Shrimp aquaculture rapidly expanded in this tidal floodplain but shrimp is highly susceptible to disease, has less contribution in local consumption, and its profitability depends on international market prices, leading the demand for improving the farming system.

Assessing adaptation options for climate change: A guide for coastal communities in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific. 3. Impact and adaptation assessment workshop

This brochure is part of a series that collectively detail how a community-based assessment of climate change was used in partnership with coastal communities and provincial and national-level stakeholders in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands. The assessment contains four distinct, but related, steps focused on supporting community-level decision-making for adaptation through a series of participatory action research activities. Each brochure in this series details a specific activity in the four-step assessment.

The WISH pond: Potential for development of aquaculture in northeast Cambodia

In Cambodia, fish provide a major source of animal protein for rural households. Capture fisheries have declined and aquaculture has been identified as playing an important role in food and nutritional security and rural income generation. In 2011, WorldFish, in partnership with the Stung Treng Fishery Administration Cantonment and the Culture and Environment Preservation Association, aimed at improving the uptake of small-scale aquaculture by communities with limited experience in fish culture in Stung Treng Province in northeast Cambodia.

Promoting the sustainable growth of aquaculture in Myanmar to improve food Security and income for communities in the Ayeyarwady Delta and Central Dry Zone (MYFC) [Burmese version]

MYFC, a Livelihoods and Food Security Trust Fund (LIFT) funded project, aims to promote sustainable growth of aquaculture in Myanmar. By introducing low cost poly-culture combining small indigenous species of fish with mostly carps, the project intends to increase income, food and nutrition security for resource-poor households in the Ayeyarwady Delta and the central dry zone (CDZ). With a particular focus on women and children, and running over three years (2016-2018), MYFC will target four townships in each area.

Fish, sediment and dams in the Mekong

The Mekong River is home to the largest inland fishery in the world, which is due in part to its exceptional sediment and nutrient loads. The number of dams in the Basin is expected to increase from 16 in the year 2000 to between 77 and 136 by 2030. These dams retain and accumulate sediments and nutrients in their reservoirs; as such, planned dam development is expected to result in a 60% to 96% reduction in sediment flow to downstream Mekong waters.

Pages

Subscribe to WorldFish RSS