Technical characteristics and economic performance of commercial Tilapia hatcheries applying different management systems in Egypt

This study was carried out in order to understand the technical and economic characteristics of different Egyptian Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) hatchery systems. Hatchery operators at fifty tilapia hatcheries in four governorates were interviewed and four focus group discussions were held with 61 participants in March 2012.

Sustainable production of small fish in wetland areas of Bangladesh

Bangladesh is rich in aquatic resources with extensive seasonal and perennial water bodies throughout the country. In the past, the expansive floodplains, oxbow lakes, beels, and haors were home to a vast range of fish species. Of the 260 fishes found in the inland waters of Bangladesh, 150 grow to a small size (maximum length of about 25 cm), and these are found in the wetlands.

Supporting gender-inclusive dialogue over natural resource management

Rural households who fail to gain a voice in decisions over the management of shared forests, pasturelands, wetlands and fisheries face heightened risks to their livelihoods, particularly as competition increases between existing and new user groups. Exclusion from decision-making increases vulnerability of rural households, making it more difficult for them to move out of poverty and thwarting broader efforts to achieve sustainable resource management. Poor rural women in particular often face institutionalized barriers to effective participation in resource management.

Sumilon Island: Philippine marine park pilot site enjoys early success

Since 1974, Sumilon, a 23-ha island near the southeastern tip of Cebu, Philippines, has been managed by Silliman University as a natural reserve in cooperation with the municipality of Oslob, Cebu. The use of the island as a marine park pilot site has been made possible through the Marine Parks Development Program within the Ministry of Natural Resources. This articles gives an account of this pilot project.

Study on impacts of farmer-led research supported by civil society organizations

Decades of scientific research related to agriculture and natural resource management have brought limited benefits to smallholder farmers, including crop farmers, fishers, livestock keepers and other resource users. Therefore, donors, policymakers and civil society organizations (CSOs), such as farmer organizations and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), are urging the formal research sector to make its work more useful to smallholder farmers.

Striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, Sauvage, 1878) aquaculture in Bangladesh: an overview

Farming of the striped catfish, Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, is a major aquaculture activity in Bangladesh, particularly in the district of Mymensingh. However, pangasius farm management practices and the socio-economic impacts of pangasius farming systems in Mymensingh have not yet been adequately described in the literature. This article provides an overview of the present status and characteristics of pangasius culture in Bangladesh based on data from a study conducted in Mymensingh district during 2009.

Strengthening impact evaluation in natural resource management

The workshop on Strengthening Evaluation in Natural Resource Management Research is part of an ACIAR-funded Small Research and Development Activity (SRA) on Assessing the Impacts of Natural Resource Management and Policy Research in Development Programs, with WorldFish and Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) as partners. The SRA objectives included a review of literature to identify challenges in assessing the impact of NRMR programs and to propose a framework that addresses them.

Strengthening collective action to address resource conflict in Lake Kariba, Zambia

Where natural resources are a key component of the rural economy, the ability of the poor to realize their visions for the future depends significantly on institutional structures that govern resource access and management. This case study reports on an initiative on the shores of Lake Kariba in Zambia, where lakeshore residents face competition over fishing, tourism, and commercial aquaculture.


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