Water use at integrated aquaculture-agriculture farms: experiences with limited water resources in Egypt

Fish farming in Egypt is not formally recognized as an agricultural activity, so aquaculture cannot use water from irrigation canals. However, fish are raised as primary or secondary crops in combination with fruit and other plant crops. A study by the WorldFish Center found farms could efficiently use well water to intensively raise tilapia in aerated tanks and use the effluent to irrigate fruit trees, vegetables and flowers. Two other farms used water from nearby Nile irrigation canals to fill water storage reservoirs stocked with tilapia.

Vulnerability of mangroves, seagrasses and intertidal flats in the tropical Pacific to climate change

Mangroves and seagrasses are of special interest to coastal fisheries worldwide because of the role they play in providing nursery areas for commonly harvested fish and invertebrates. Although the ecology of fish and invertebrates associated with mangroves and seagrasses in the tropical Pacific is not well understood compared with other parts of the world, the connectivity among mangroves, seagrasses, intertidal flats and coral reefs indicates that mangroves and seagrasses throughout the region provide a similar function to such habitats elsewhere.

Value chain analysis of the aquaculture feed sector in Egypt

This study was carried out to evaluate the value chain performance of the aquaculture feed sector in Egypt, in terms of value addition, employment and profitability. The strengths and weaknesses of each link of the value chain were assessed and appropriate upgrading, management and development strategies were suggested. Quantitative data were collected for each link in the value-chain through structured questionnaires that were drafted and distributed to the key players in the sector; 25 fish feed mills and 34 fish farms covering different geographical and production regions.

Unconventional fishing methods in the Anambra and Imo River Basins, Nigeria

The Anambra and Imo River basins are richly endowed with fishery resources. The use of unconventional fishing methods, such as local poisonous herbs and chemicals and various explosives, threatens to destroy their aquatic resources. Some control measures to be taken are suggested in the following areas: education, patrols, cooperatives and legislation.

Trophic model of the coastal fisheries ecosystem of the west coast of peninsular Malaysia

A preliminary mass-balance trophic model was constructed for the coastal fisheries ecosystem of the West Coast of Peninsular Malaysia (0 - 120 m depth). The ecosystem was partitioned into 15 trophic groups, and biomasses for selected groups were obtained from research (trawl) surveys conducted in the area in 1987 and 1991. Trophic interactions of the groups are presented. The network analysis indicates that fishing fleets for demersal fishes and prawns have a major direct or indirect impact on most high-trophic level groups in the ecosystem.

Training Manual on improved carp/carp-shing poly culture in pond and dyke cropping

Due to inadequate technical knowledge and training in advanced methods of gradually growing carp poly culture, framers are not getting expected yield. From the very beginning of the CSISA-BD project, WoldFish Center has taken initiative to introduce advanced methods in carp poly culture. To do this, the shortage of skilled trainers and training materials, has, particularly, been realized. Presently, a number of manuals on carp poly culture from Department of Fisheries, Bangladesh Fisheries Research Institute, WorldFish Center and different GOs and NGOs are available.

Trading-off fish biodiversity, food security, and hydropower in the Mekong River Basin

The Mekong River Basin, site of the biggest inland fishery in the world, is undergoing massive hydropower development. Planned dams will block critical fish migration routes between the river's downstream floodplains and upstream tributaries. Here we estimate fish biomass and biodiversity losses in numerous damming scenarios using a simple ecological model of fish migration. Our framework allows detailing trade-offs between dam locations, power production, and impacts on fish resources.

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