Planning the use of fish for food security in Solomon Islands

This study was funded through the USAID-supported Coral Triangle Support Partnership (CTSP). As part of the US CTI Support Program, CTSP is part of the United States Government’s commitment to promote the sustainable management of the marine and coastal resources in the Coral Triangle. In cooperation with the Coral Triangle national governments and the international community, CTSP is a five-year program that provides technical assistance and helps build capacity to address critical issues including food security, climate change, and marine biological diversity.

Increasing water productivity in agriculture

Increasing water productivity is an important element in improved water management for sustainable agriculture, food security and healthy ecosystem functioning. Water productivity is defined as the amount of agricultural output per unit of water depleted, and can be assessed for crops, trees, livestock and fish. This chapter reviews challenges in and opportunities for improving water productivity in socially equitable and sustainable ways by thinking beyond technologies, and fostering enabling institutions and policies.

Economic analysis of climate change adaptation strategies in selected coastal areas in Indonesia, Philippines and Vietnam

This report is an account of a cross-country study that covered Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippines. Covering four sites (one each in Indonesia and Vietnam) and two sites in the Philippines, the study documented the impacts of three climate hazards affecting coastal communities, namely typhoon/flooding, coastal erosion and saltwater intrusion. It also analyzed planned adaptation options, which communities and local governments can implement, as well as autonomous responses of households to protect and insure themselves from these hazards.

Assessing adaptation options for climate change: A guide for coastal communities in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific. 2. Climate analysis

This brochure is part of a series that collectively detail how a community-based assessment of climate change was used in partnership with coastal communities and provincial and national-level stakeholders in Timor-Leste and Solomon Islands. The assessment contains four distinct, but related, steps focused on supporting community-level decision-making for adaptation through a series of participatory action research activities. Each brochure in this series details a specific activity in the four-step assessment.

Aquaculture

Biophysical impacts of aquaculture, with consequences for biodiversity, vary with species and culture systems and include issues such as: nutrient enrichment/removal, chemicals, land use, species introductions, genetic flow to wild populations, disturbance of balance or introduction of pathogen/parasites, consumption of capture fishery resources, energy, and greenhouse gas emissions. Guiding principles, labeling schemes and various tools are needed to analyze performance and conformance.

Traditional fisheries development in the Philippines.

Development programmes aimed at raising income levels of the half-million Philippine traditional municipal fishermen have emphasized production-oriented projects designed to up-grade vessels and gear. Review of recent biological, technical, and socio-economic research provides evidence that technology-based efforts have generally not been successful, and that the coastal resources fished by municipal fishermen are not as extensive as previously supposed.

Rice-fish integration for high saline, coastal areas of Bangladesh: Learning from the Challenge Program for Water and Food (CPWF)

The Southwestern coastal zone of Bangladesh is agro-based and one of the world’s most populous, poverty-stricken and food-insecure regions, with high vulnerability to climate change. Shrimp aquaculture rapidly expanded in this tidal floodplain but shrimp is highly susceptible to disease, has less contribution in local consumption, and its profitability depends on international market prices, leading the demand for improving the farming system.

Growth and survival of olive barb, Puntius sarana (Hamilton 1822) larvae produced with cryopreserved versus fresh sperm

Despite the success in fertilization and hatching of fish eggs with cryopreserved sperm, report on growth and survival of larvae produced from frozen-thawed sperm is inadequate. This study evaluates the applicability of cryopreserved sperm for mass seed production by comparing the growth and survival of a popular food-fish olive barb, Puntius sarana (Hamilton 1822) larvae produced from cryopreserved and fresh sperm.

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