Home > Tags > Africa

Africa

Sustainable Development in the Coral Triangle

If marine biodiversity is what you are after, then look no further than the Coral Triangle. This remarkable patch of water spans the seas between the six Indo-Pacific nations of Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Timor-Leste, Papua New Guinea, and the Solomon Islands. The tropical waters of the Coral Triangle are among the most biologically diverse – and environmentally vulnerable – regions of the world. The Coral Triangle’s coral reefs, mangrove forests, and seagrass beds are home to vast numbers of fish, sharks and rays, as well as sea turtles and marine mammals.

Iceboxes help women fish retailers find profits

A group of women fish retailers in the Egyptian region of Shakshouk near Fayoum are realizing better profits from the sale after of their fish due to the acquisition of iceboxes.  Iceboxes help them keep their fish fresh in the market, allowing them to sell more stock each day.

Increased productivity in Ghana from fast-growing Nile Tilapia

WorldFish, Malaysia (30 November 2012)
 
An improved breed of Nile Tilapia that grows 30% faster than non-improved strains is helping to increase aquaculture productivity and food security in Ghana.
 

Improved breeding of Nile Tilapia leads to productivity gains

WorldFish, Malaysia (30 November 2012)
 
Two improved strains of Nile Tilapia that grow 30% faster and heavier than non-improved strains are helping to increase aquaculture productivity and food security in West Africa and Egypt.
 

Profitability of small-scale fisheries in Elmina, Ghana

Profitability of small-scale fisheries in Elmina, Ghana
Aheto, D.W. ; Asare, N.K. ; Tenkorang, E.Y. ; Asare, C. ; Okyere, I. Sustainability 4(11): 2785-2794 2012
In order to achieve sustainable fishing livelihoods in coastal communities, data on profitability of small-scale fisheries relative to fish species caught and gear types used by fishermen is required as part of a broader fisheries management strategy. This study was undertaken with this in mind. Interviews were conducted among 60 fishermen between February and March 2010. Economic assessment of small-scale fishing activities were done using questionnaires based on direct market pricing and contingent valuation methods. The results indicate that highly profitable fish species include Epinephelus aeneus, Sparus caeruleostictus, Dentex angolensis and Lutjanus goreensis valued at US$2.97, US$2.87, US$2.85 and US$2.63 per kilogram respectively. The less profitable species include Dasyatis margarita, Caranx crysos and Sardinella aurita valued at US$0.34, US$0.66 and US$ 0.85 per kilogram respectively. Although Sardinella aurita was among the less valuable fish species, it was the main species driving profits for the fishermen due to its high share volume among the fish catches. Findings from this study suggest high rates of exploitation, in that stocks generally cannot provide for increased economic return in the face of increased investment. This is a clear indicator that the open-access nature of Ghanaian fisheries is not sustainable, and management reform is well overdue. Read the full text.

Wetlands: towards a sustainable future

Wetland environments, including freshwater floodplains and coastal deltas, can be highly productive; more than 700 million people around the world depend directly on them, whether for crop production, fishing, livestock rearing or other natural resources. But wetland livelihoods typically face a myriad of constraints, and increasingly extreme and unpredictable seasonal rainfall patterns are making matters worse for many.

Pages

Subscribe to Africa