Research in development: the approach of AAS

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) is pursuing a Research in Development approach that emphasizes the importance of embedding research in the development context. Reflecting this emphasis the six elements of this approach are a commitment to people and place, participatory action research, gender transformative research, learning and networking, partnerships, and capacity building. It is through the careful pursuit of these six elements that we believe that the program will achieve the development outcomes we aspire to, and do so at scale.

Population dynamics of Etelis carbunculus (Lutjanidae in Tonga, South Pacific)

This paper presents a tentative estimate of the parameters L8 and K of the von Bertalanffy growth function, and an estimate of total mortality derived from the analysis, using the ELEFAN I and II programs, of length-frequency data on the snapper Etelis carbunculus (Lutjanidae) collected on seamounts of the Kingdom of Tonga, South Pacific.

Performance of mono-sex tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in rice field with different ditch size

The effects of ditch size on growth and production of mono-sex tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus in rain fed concurrent rice–fish system were technically and economically evaluated for a period of 4 months. Three different ditch sizes were tried: 5%, 10% and 15% of the total cultivable rice field. It is concluded that rice–fish farming in a rain fed ecosystem of Bangladesh with medium ditch size and stocking density of 5000 ha-1 mono-sex tilapia can achieve better economic return.

Participatory action research on climate risk management, Bangladesh

The rural populations of southern Bangladesh are some of the most vulnerable communities in the world to the future impacts of climate change. They are particularly at risk from floods, waterlogged soils, and increasing salinity of both land and water. The objective of this project was to analyze the vulnerability of people in four villages that are experiencing different levels of soil salinity.

Integrated farming in Zimbabwe

Integration of aquaculture with agricul¬ture (integrated farming) provides balanced food production, increases farmers' income, recycles nutrients, protects the environment and optimizes food production where resources are limited. Zimbabwe is a land-locked country with abundant resources in the form of dams, lakes, streams, rivers and groundwater. The rationale for development of integrated farming in Zimbabwe is given.

Green economy in a blue world: synthesis report

The Green Economy in a Blue World report analyzes how key sectors that are interlinked with the marine and coastal environment (the blue world) can make the transition towards a Green Economy. The report covers the impacts and opportunities linked with shipping and fisheries to tourism, marine-based renewable energies and agriculture. The findings underline that a shift to sustainability in terms of improved human wellbeing and social equity can lead to healthier and more economically productive oceans that can simultaneously benefit coastal communities and ocean-linked industries.

Fisheries and aquaculture: The importance of fish for food and nutritional security

This working paper is an attempt to distil what is known currently about the likely impacts of climate change on the commodities and natural resources that comprise the mandate of CGIAR and its 15 Centres. In this WorldFish contribution, a summary is given on the importance of fisheries and aquaculture on food nutrition and security.

Evaluation of the use of fresh water by four Egyptian farms applying integrated aquaculture-agriculture: study report

This report describes a study done in 2010 by researchers of the WorldFish Center on water use in Egyptian farms that apply aquaculture – agriculture integration. Two of the four farms that were monitored derived the main income from farming and selling fish, the two other farms were mainly agricultural farms that used reservoirs that were built to store irrigation water for growing fish. The volume of water in which fish were raised from fingerling to market size and that was subsequently used to irrigate agriculture crops was estimated.

Effects of stocking density on production and economics of all-male tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) culture in a rain fed rice-fish ecosystem

Effects of stocking density on the growth, production, and economics of all-male tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were investigated in a rain-fed rice-fish ecosystem for a period of 120 days. Fish were stocked at the rate of 4000, 5000, and 6000 ha-1 in treatments T1, T2, and T3, respectively. Water quality was suitable for fish culture. Significantly higher growth was observed in T1 as compared to other treatments. SGR ranged from 1.26 to 1.51. Survival varied between 79% and 88% with treatment T1 producing the highest survival.

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