Small-scale aquaculture: Global and national perspectives

Fish has been a staple food for over a billion people. Its demand is increasing due to growing population and awareness about health benefits of aquatic animal food. Disappointingly, wild catch worldwide is on the decline and aquaculture is emerging as the only solution. It grew at 9%/yr in the last 10 years becoming the fastest growing food production sector. At present, aquaculture produces only about 45 million t per year but it needs to be doubled by 2030 to meet its growing demand. Asia produces over 85% of the global farmed fish - mostly by small-scale farmers.

Scoping report: Current status of index-based insurance in Bangladesh

With current and anticipated increases in magnitude of extreme weather events and a declining consistency in weather patterns, particularly challenging for agriculture, there has been a growing interest in weather index-based insurance (IBI) schemes in Bangladesh. A number of weather index-based insurance products have already been tested and applied across Asia and Africa, with varying degrees of success, as a mechanism to improve livelihood security by enabling vulnerable populations to transfer risk associated with climate change, extreme weather events and other hazards.

Research in development: the approach of AAS

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) is pursuing a Research in Development approach that emphasizes the importance of embedding research in the development context. Reflecting this emphasis the six elements of this approach are a commitment to people and place, participatory action research, gender transformative research, learning and networking, partnerships, and capacity building. It is through the careful pursuit of these six elements that we believe that the program will achieve the development outcomes we aspire to, and do so at scale.

Reporting fishpond yields to farmers

The frustrations encountered when trying to compare technical reports in which fishpond yield figures are reported in a variety of units (e.g., kg/ha, kg/pond, lb/acre, etc.) are familiar to most aquaculturists. However, severe problems may develop when trying to com¬municate research results to other audiences if data are transformed to a hectare basis. The authors gives his own experience in conveying research data to the farmers and the problem encountered.

Reconceptualising adaptation to climate change as part of pathways of change and response

The need to adapt to climate change is now widely recognised as evidence of its impacts on social and natural systems grows and greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated. Yet efforts to adapt to climate change, as reported in the literature over the last decade and in selected case studies, have not led to substantial rates of implementation of adaptation actions despite substantial investments in adaptation science. Moreover, implemented actions have been mostly incremental and focused on proximate causes; there are far fewer reports of more systemic or transformative actions.

Problems in estimating growth parameters of the wahoo Acanthocybium solandri (Scombridae) using the ELEFAN 1 program

Plots of Rn, the goodness-of-fit index of teh ELEFAN I program versus K can be used jointly with fixed values of the other growth parameters to identify "optimum values" of K. This is here illustrated using data on wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri, Fam. Scombridae) from St. Lucia, West India.

Population dynamics of Etelis carbunculus (Lutjanidae in Tonga, South Pacific)

This paper presents a tentative estimate of the parameters L8 and K of the von Bertalanffy growth function, and an estimate of total mortality derived from the analysis, using the ELEFAN I and II programs, of length-frequency data on the snapper Etelis carbunculus (Lutjanidae) collected on seamounts of the Kingdom of Tonga, South Pacific.

Linking climate change, rice yield, and migration: the Philippine experience

This study tests the hypothesis that climate change, through its rice productivity impacts, induces out-migration in the Philippines. Results show that climate change effects such as increasing night time temperature and extreme rainfall pattern, by way of reduction in rice yield and farm revenues, significantly increases the number of Overseas Filipino Workers. Findings also show that overseas migration of female workers is more sensitive to climate and rice productivity changes compared to male overseas migration.

Integrated farming in Zimbabwe

Integration of aquaculture with agricul¬ture (integrated farming) provides balanced food production, increases farmers' income, recycles nutrients, protects the environment and optimizes food production where resources are limited. Zimbabwe is a land-locked country with abundant resources in the form of dams, lakes, streams, rivers and groundwater. The rationale for development of integrated farming in Zimbabwe is given.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Agriculture