Participatory action research on climate risk management, Bangladesh

The rural populations of southern Bangladesh are some of the most vulnerable communities in the world to the future impacts of climate change. They are particularly at risk from floods, waterlogged soils, and increasing salinity of both land and water. The objective of this project was to analyze the vulnerability of people in four villages that are experiencing different levels of soil salinity.

Institutional arrangements in seasonal floodplain management under community-based aquaculture in Bangladesh

Seasonal floodplains under private and public ownership in the Indo-Ganges river basin provide food and income for millions of people in Bangladesh. Floodplain ownership regimes are diverse, covering the whole spectrum from public to private ownership. The paper compares community-based fish culture projects in these floodplains and analyzes the institutional arrangements of three different Floodplain Management Committees (FMC).

Impacts of climate change and variability on fish value chains in Uganda

Fish are a significant source of income and food security in Uganda, highly vulnerable to climate and non-climate related drivers of change. This study examines the vulnerability of the fish sector in Uganda as it relates to the predicted impacts from climate change and variability, using the concept of the value chain. The specific purpose of the study was to identify current and potential impact pathways of climate change and corresponding adaptation strategies in fish value chains.

Green economy in a blue world: synthesis report

The Green Economy in a Blue World report analyzes how key sectors that are interlinked with the marine and coastal environment (the blue world) can make the transition towards a Green Economy. The report covers the impacts and opportunities linked with shipping and fisheries to tourism, marine-based renewable energies and agriculture. The findings underline that a shift to sustainability in terms of improved human wellbeing and social equity can lead to healthier and more economically productive oceans that can simultaneously benefit coastal communities and ocean-linked industries.

The forgotten service: food as an ecosystem service from estuarine and coastal zones

In this chapter, we review in detail the existing body of literature and knowledge related to the provision of food in estuaries and coastal zones. Both aquatic and terrestrial commodities are considered. The chapter highlights not only the importance of the terrestrial zone in overall food provision but also the substantial contribution of aquatic coastal resources. The various problems that the coastal zone faces in sustaining this important provisioning service in the face of increasing pressure and demands from other sectors are highlighted.

Design and implementation of fishery modules in integrated household surveys in developing countries

Fish and other aquatic animals contribute to the food security of citizens of developing countries, both as a source of income and as a component of healthy diets, yet fishing is not currently captured in most integrated household surveys. This sourcebook provides essential technical guidance on the design of statistical modules and questionnaires aimed at collecting fishery data at the household level.

Communication strategy

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) is one of the CGIAR’s 15 research programs. Through a program of participatory action research, referred to as “Research in Development”, the Program aims to improve the lives of the many millions of people who depend on aquatic agricultural systems. This Strategy will create the platform to capture, collect, produce, manage, brand and share information that is generated throughout the Program’s lifecycle.

CGIAR Research Program on climate change, agriculture and food security

Climate change is an unprecedented threat to the food security of hundreds of millions of people. Climate change affects agriculture and food security, and likewise, agriculture and natural resource management affect the climate system. These complex and dynamic relationships are also shaped by economic policies, political conflict and other factors such as the spread of infectious diseases. The relationships between all these factors and how they interact are not well understood, nor are the advantages and disadvantages of different responses to climate change.

CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health

In the developing world, more than 1 billion people depend on fish for most of their animal protein, and another 1 billion people depend on livestock. Poor people, especially women and children, typically eat very little meat, milk and fish. This contributes to nutrient deficiencies and poor physical and cognitive development for children and poor health and livelihood outcomes for adults.

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