Research in development: the approach of AAS

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) is pursuing a Research in Development approach that emphasizes the importance of embedding research in the development context. Reflecting this emphasis the six elements of this approach are a commitment to people and place, participatory action research, gender transformative research, learning and networking, partnerships, and capacity building. It is through the careful pursuit of these six elements that we believe that the program will achieve the development outcomes we aspire to, and do so at scale.

Problems in estimating growth parameters of the wahoo Acanthocybium solandri (Scombridae) using the ELEFAN 1 program

Plots of Rn, the goodness-of-fit index of teh ELEFAN I program versus K can be used jointly with fixed values of the other growth parameters to identify "optimum values" of K. This is here illustrated using data on wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri, Fam. Scombridae) from St. Lucia, West India.

Institutional arrangements in seasonal floodplain management under community-based aquaculture in Bangladesh

Seasonal floodplains under private and public ownership in the Indo-Ganges river basin provide food and income for millions of people in Bangladesh. Floodplain ownership regimes are diverse, covering the whole spectrum from public to private ownership. The paper compares community-based fish culture projects in these floodplains and analyzes the institutional arrangements of three different Floodplain Management Committees (FMC).

Improved management, increased culture and consumption of small fish species can improve diets of the rural poor

In many low-income countries with water resources, small fish species are important for the livelihoods, nutrition and income of the rural poor. The small size of fish favours frequent consumption by and nutrition of the rural poor, as these fish are captured, sold and bought in small quantities; used both raw and processed in traditional dishes; and are nutrient-rich. All small fish species are a rich source of animal protein, and – as they are eaten whole – have a very high content of bioavailable calcium. Some are rich in vitamin A, iron, zinc and essential fats.

Impacts of climate change and variability on fish value chains in Uganda

Fish are a significant source of income and food security in Uganda, highly vulnerable to climate and non-climate related drivers of change. This study examines the vulnerability of the fish sector in Uganda as it relates to the predicted impacts from climate change and variability, using the concept of the value chain. The specific purpose of the study was to identify current and potential impact pathways of climate change and corresponding adaptation strategies in fish value chains.

Survival, male morphotypes, female and male proportion, female reproductive status and tag loss in crosses among three populations of freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (de Man) in India

The present study examined the variation in survival, proportion of male morphotypes, female and male proportion, female reproductive status and tag losses in nine crosses from a complete (3 × 3) diallel mating of three populations of Macrobrachium rosenbergii in India. The populations originated from Gujarat (north-west), Kerala (south-west) and Odisha (east), representing different agro-ecological regions in India. Progeny from 60 families (4773 juveniles) were individually tagged and reared for 16–17 weeks in earthen ponds. Binary logistic regression was used to analyse the data.

Reporting fishpond yields to farmers

The frustrations encountered when trying to compare technical reports in which fishpond yield figures are reported in a variety of units (e.g., kg/ha, kg/pond, lb/acre, etc.) are familiar to most aquaculturists. However, severe problems may develop when trying to com¬municate research results to other audiences if data are transformed to a hectare basis. The authors gives his own experience in conveying research data to the farmers and the problem encountered.

The pond refuge in rice-fish systems

Small fishponds on irrigated and rainfed rice farms may be used by farmers as pond refuges to hold fish that foragein the ricefield, for breeding and nursing purposes, and for holding fish after rice harvesting. The pond refuge systemis found in China, Indonesia and Thailand and is currently being tested in the Philippines. Advantages of the pond refuge system are listed.

Performance of mono-sex tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in rice field with different ditch size

The effects of ditch size on growth and production of mono-sex tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus in rain fed concurrent rice–fish system were technically and economically evaluated for a period of 4 months. Three different ditch sizes were tried: 5%, 10% and 15% of the total cultivable rice field. It is concluded that rice–fish farming in a rain fed ecosystem of Bangladesh with medium ditch size and stocking density of 5000 ha-1 mono-sex tilapia can achieve better economic return.

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