Striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, Sauvage, 1878) aquaculture in Bangladesh: an overview

Farming of the striped catfish, Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, is a major aquaculture activity in Bangladesh, particularly in the district of Mymensingh. However, pangasius farm management practices and the socio-economic impacts of pangasius farming systems in Mymensingh have not yet been adequately described in the literature. This article provides an overview of the present status and characteristics of pangasius culture in Bangladesh based on data from a study conducted in Mymensingh district during 2009.

WorldFish message guide. Version 2

The WorldFish message guide has been created to standardize and unify our messaging about how we describe our organization and our work. The goal is to create a more unified and stronger brand. All WorldFish staff and consultants are encouraged to use this guide when drafting reports, stories or other publications or when preparing for presentations.

Wind energy, hydropower and heat pumps for aquaculture

Wind and water power have a significant contribution to make to aquaculture and fish processing. Wind energy can provide mechanical power to operate pumps and aerators and can clso be used to generate electricity. Small-scalehydropower may be used to serve aquaculture in many ways wherever there is sufficient flow and fall of water. Additionally, refrigeration equipment and heat pumps may be driven by both wind and water power. The integration of these systems can serve energy needs in fish farming for processing, ice-making, mechanical power and electricity.

Water quality research or water quality checking: proposed guidelines

A simple plan is outlined to assist in the design of water quality research and monitoring programmes at aquacultureresearch stations. Before monitoring any programme, a decision on the goals of the aquaculture research to be performed is crucial to planning; the plan follows two major pathways--fish yield parameters-water quality checkingprogramme; and, water quality parameters/water quality research programme.

Using the growth performance index Phi to choose species aquaculture: an example from Kuwait

Following a brief account of the advantages of using the growth performance index in choosing species for culture purposes, an examination is made of growth parameters of Epinephelus suilis and Acanthopagrus cuvieri chosen for a marine culture programme in Kuwait in order to determine whether use of the growth index could have helped. Implications of the Kuwait experience for other countries are considered.

Transforming gender relations: Key to positive development outcomes in aquatic agricultural systems

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) is committed to improving the food security and wellbeing of poor people who depend on freshwater and coastal ecosystems for their livelihoods. AAS is particularly concerned with enhancing the equity of the social, economic and political structures that influence the livelihoods of poor households dependent on aquatic agricultural systems.

Strengthening collective action to address resource conflict in Lake Kariba, Zambia

Where natural resources are a key component of the rural economy, the ability of the poor to realize their visions for the future depends significantly on institutional structures that govern resource access and management. This case study reports on an initiative on the shores of Lake Kariba in Zambia, where lakeshore residents face competition over fishing, tourism, and commercial aquaculture.

Stirring ponds as a possible means of increasing aquaculture production.

A discussion is presented on the topic of pond stirring in aquaculture as a means of increasing productivity of the fish ponds. Pond stirring may be done either mechanically or by using aquatic organisms (bioturbation), and increases the nutrients in the water column and resulting microbial production, also supplying food and surfaces for microbial colonization for consumption by fish.

Socioeconomic and bioeconomic performance of Philippine fisheries in the recent decades

The fishing industry in the Philippines was tantamount to a marine capture fishery in the 1950s to 1960s. Aquaculture and inland fishery production were not significant. Only during the 1970s did aquaculture and inland capture fisheries contribute significantly to fish production. From 250 000 t fish production in 1951, this increased substantially to 1.6 million t in the 1990s. An average 4.3% was contributed by fisheries to the gross domestic product from 1988 - 98. Fisheries export earnings reached P12 billion in the 1990s.

Small-scale aquaculture, development and poverty: a reassessment

The potential of small-scale aquaculture (SSA) to contribute to development goals including poverty reduction and improved food security has been widely discussed. These accounts emphasize the following characteristics of SSA: the relative poverty of practising households; the subsistence or semi-subsistence nature of the activity; its role as a means of agricultural diversification; its contribution to food security; family ownership and operation of production or reliance on predominantly family labour; and utilization of small areas of land and/or water.

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