The Current status of aquaculture and aquafeed production in Bangladesh

Over the last decade, dramatic increases in the production of a variety of species from commercial aquaculture systems and sharp increases in per capita fish consumption have occurred in Bangladesh. This transition has been made possible by widespread adoption of semi-intensive and intensive production practices, accompanied by growth in the production and use of aquafeeds. Findings relating to the current status of aquaculture in Bangladesh have been reported in greater detail elsewhere.

Considerations about effective dissemination of improved fish strains (in Arabic)

Aquaculture production systems in developing countries are largely based on the use of unimproved species and strains. As knowledge and experience are accumulated in relation to the management, feeding and animal health issues of such production systems, the availability of genetically more productive stock becomes imperative in order to more effectively use resources. For instance, there is little point in providing ideal water conditions and optimum feed quality to fish that do not have the potential to grow faster and to be harvested on time, providing a product of the desired quality.

Community management as part of the inland capture fisheries strategy in Bangladesh

Bangladesh has had comprehensive experience of community based management for inland capture fisheries from several projects (revenue and externally funded) over the last 10 to 15 years. The lessons were extensively used for the elaboration of a strategy and a programme, which will seek to consolidate gains in and expansion of community based management linked to institutional and legal reform and a recognition and strengthening of the roles of civil society and the private sector. The Ministry of Fisheries and Livestock adopted the National Fisheries Strategy in January 2006.

Common interests, private gains: a study of co-operative floodplain aquaculture

In recent years a number of floodplain aquaculture projects have sprung up in the Daudkandi area of Comilla District. Key to this development are a number of unique organisational and financing arrangements which facilitate the development of necessary infrastructure through issuing shares to farmers who have land in the targeted floodplain area. In February 2007, a short review was carried out to better understand how floodplain aquaculture was affecting a range of local social, economic and environmental issues.

The characteristics and status of pond aquaculture in Bangladesh

Very rapid developments are widely believed to have occurred within Bangladesh's aquaculture sector in recent years, but have yet to be adequately documented. This paper addresses the information gap based on a comprehensive review of literature and data. The current status of pond based aquaculture in Bangladesh is summarized in terms of the quantities and species of fish produced and the technical and social characteristics of the production systems from which they originate.

Carrying capacities and site selection within the ecosystem approach to aquaculture

The growth in world aquaculture required to meet the demands of society will result in ever-increasing pressure upon aquatic and terrestrial resources. There are also potential consequences on the environment and on biodiversity, as well as inevitable societal impacts. There is growing adoption of aspects of the ecosystem approach to aquaculture (EAA), which takes a holistic view of the developments in the sector in an attempt to enable sustainable growth while avoiding negative effects.

Can the global adoption of genetically improved farmed fish increase beyond 10%, and how?

The annual production from global aquaculture has increased rapidly from 2.6 million tons or 3.9% of the total supply of fish, shellfish and mollusks in 1970, to 66.7 million tons or 42.2% in 2012, while capture fisheries have more or less leveled out at about 90 million tons per year since the turn of the century. Consequently, the future seafood supply is likely to depend on a further increase of aquaculture production. Unlike terrestrial animal farming, less than 10% of the aquaculture production comes from domesticated and selectively bred farm stocks.

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