Considerations about effective dissemination of improved fish strains (in Arabic)

Aquaculture production systems in developing countries are largely based on the use of unimproved species and strains. As knowledge and experience are accumulated in relation to the management, feeding and animal health issues of such production systems, the availability of genetically more productive stock becomes imperative in order to more effectively use resources. For instance, there is little point in providing ideal water conditions and optimum feed quality to fish that do not have the potential to grow faster and to be harvested on time, providing a product of the desired quality.

Carrying capacities and site selection within the ecosystem approach to aquaculture

The growth in world aquaculture required to meet the demands of society will result in ever-increasing pressure upon aquatic and terrestrial resources. There are also potential consequences on the environment and on biodiversity, as well as inevitable societal impacts. There is growing adoption of aspects of the ecosystem approach to aquaculture (EAA), which takes a holistic view of the developments in the sector in an attempt to enable sustainable growth while avoiding negative effects.

Can the global adoption of genetically improved farmed fish increase beyond 10%, and how?

The annual production from global aquaculture has increased rapidly from 2.6 million tons or 3.9% of the total supply of fish, shellfish and mollusks in 1970, to 66.7 million tons or 42.2% in 2012, while capture fisheries have more or less leveled out at about 90 million tons per year since the turn of the century. Consequently, the future seafood supply is likely to depend on a further increase of aquaculture production. Unlike terrestrial animal farming, less than 10% of the aquaculture production comes from domesticated and selectively bred farm stocks.

Can aquaculture benefit the extreme poor? A case study of landless and socially marginalized Adivasi (ethnic) communities in Bangladesh

The Adivasi Fisheries Project, aimed at diversifying livelihood options for resource-poor Adivasi (ethnic) communities in the North and Northwest of Bangladesh, was implemented during 2007–9. Aquaculture and related technologies were introduced to a total of 3,594 resource-poor Adivasi households. Baseline and end-line surveys were applied to assess the changes in their livelihoods following intervention.

A bright future for fish farming

It is highly unlikely that wild capture fisheries will be able to produce higher yields in future. For aquaculture the opposite is the case. No other food production sector has grown as fast over the past 20 years. Aquaculture is expected to satisfy the growing world population’s demand for fish – and at the same time protect ocean fish stocks. Hopes are pinned on farming as an alternative to over-fishing. But the use of copious amounts of feed derived from wild fish, the destruction of mangrove forests and the use of antibiotics have given fish farming a bad name.

Brackishwater pond development in Sumatra

In 1976 the Government of Indonesia began a brackish water pond (tambak) development project on the east coast of the north Sumatra provinces Aceh and North Sumatra. Strategic outputs for the 2 province projects are listed. It was decided that polyculture of milkfish (Chanos chanos ) and shrimp (Penaeus monodon ) would be promoted as the most realistic of several possibilities. A mini-estate pilot project was undertaken in order to determine how the tambak expansion could be conducted in an orderly way, both technically and economically sound.

Brackishwater aquaculture: threat to the environment

Details are given of developments in the Philippines regarding the conversion of mangrove forests intobrackishwater fishponds, considering in particular environmental implications. Social and human costs and ecological costs are examined. The effects of increased stocking densities and of the use of chemicals and drugs on the pond ecosystems are discussed. Recommendations are given regarding measures to be taken for the conservation and management of the environment.

The benefits of aquaculture

Aquaculture’s contribution to the world’s food basket is essential as global demand for fish grows. Today, fish provides more than 1 billion people with most of their daily animal protein. And, in regions with the greatest number of resource-poor and vulnerable people, fish is often the primary animal-source food. This fact sheet presents the key benefits of aquaculture to nutrition, food security and the role of WorldFish in supporting and improving the growth of sustainable aquaculture.

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