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Aquaculture

Does aquaculture add resilience to the global food system?

Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector and continues to expand alongside terrestrial crop and livestock production. Using portfolio theory as a conceptual framework, the authors explore how current interconnections between the aquaculture, crop, livestock, and fisheries sectors act as an impediment to, or an opportunity for, enhanced resilience in the global food system given increased resource scarcity and climate change
 

Cambodian People Consume about 5,3 kilograms of Fish per Family per Week

According to a new research study, each Cambodian household consume some 5,3 kilograms of fish five times a week and 63 percent of rural people have jobs related to fishing.

 

Timor Leste Aquaculture Development Endeavors: Where are we?

Presented at WorldFish HQ, Penang, Malaysia, 23rd May 2014. This seminar is given in two parts; Dr Jharendu Pant will first be giving an overview of recent activities and future directions of aquaculture development and research in Timor-Leste, followed by Ms Shwu Jiao Teoh, who will be presenting the results of a recent project titled “Sustainable Aquaculture Development Planning Through GIS Modeling: An Experience From Timor-Leste”.

 
Friday, May 23, 2014

Impact Investing in Small-scale Aquaculture

Presented by Mr Wayne Rogers, WorldFish HQ, Penang, Malaysia, 23rd July 2014. New WorldFish research suggests investment in small aquaculture enterprises can create significant positive social, environmental and economic impact.

 
Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Weekly Overview: New Study Highlights the Path for Sustainable Aquaculture

ANALYSIS - In this week's news, new research by World Resources Institute (WRI), WorldFish, the World Bank, INRA and Kasetsart University shows that farmed fish and shellfish production will likely need to increase by 133 per cent between 2010 and 2050 in order to meet projected fish demand worldwide, writes Lucy Towers, TheFishSite Editor.
 

Exploratory analysis of resource demand and the environmental footprint of future aquaculture development using Life Cycle Assessment

Increases in fish demand in the coming decades are projected to be largely met by growth of aquaculture. However, increased aquaculture production is linked to higher demand for natural resources and energy as well as emissions to the environment.

Improving productivity and environmental performance of aquaculture

Fish—including finfish and shellfish—are an important item in the human food basket, contributing 17 percent of the global animal-based protein supply in 2010. They are an especially valuable food source in developing countries, where more than 75 percent of the world’s fish consumption occurs.

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