Myanmar fisheries: Aquaculture

Fish is an extremely important component of the Myanmar diet, and demand is growing quickly as the country urbanizes and incomes rise. Aquaculture is ideally placed to meet this demand, while also raising farm incomes and creating employment. This brief identifies three sets of policy options that could help to unlock the full potential of aquaculture’s contributions to rural growth and national food supply.

Integrated farming in Zimbabwe

Integration of aquaculture with agricul¬ture (integrated farming) provides balanced food production, increases farmers' income, recycles nutrients, protects the environment and optimizes food production where resources are limited. Zimbabwe is a land-locked country with abundant resources in the form of dams, lakes, streams, rivers and groundwater. The rationale for development of integrated farming in Zimbabwe is given.

Institutional arrangements in seasonal floodplain management under community-based aquaculture in Bangladesh

Seasonal floodplains under private and public ownership in the Indo-Ganges river basin provide food and income for millions of people in Bangladesh. Floodplain ownership regimes are diverse, covering the whole spectrum from public to private ownership. The paper compares community-based fish culture projects in these floodplains and analyzes the institutional arrangements of three different Floodplain Management Committees (FMC).

Indirect genetic effects and inbreeding: Consequences of BLUP selection for socially affected traits on rate of inbreeding

Social interactions often occur among living organisms, including aquatic animals. There is empirical evidence showing that social interactions may genetically affect phenotypes of individuals and their group mates. In this context, the heritable effect of an individual on the phenotype of another individual is known as an Indirect Genetic Effect (IGE). Selection for socially affected traits may increase response to artificial selection, but also affect rate of inbreeding.

Impacts of climate change and variability on fish value chains in Uganda

Fish are a significant source of income and food security in Uganda, highly vulnerable to climate and non-climate related drivers of change. This study examines the vulnerability of the fish sector in Uganda as it relates to the predicted impacts from climate change and variability, using the concept of the value chain. The specific purpose of the study was to identify current and potential impact pathways of climate change and corresponding adaptation strategies in fish value chains.

ICLARM and South-south technology transfer: Philippine aquaculture technology and Indonesia Part I.

A historical account is given of the discovery of Tilapia mossambica and its culture in Indonesia and the resulting success in Java of this species in rural development programs. Consequent introduction of this species to the Philippines and development of the tilapia culture industry is described, comparing it with development of the industry in Indonesia.

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