The potential of nutrient-rich small fish species in aquaculture to improve human nutrition and health

Small fish are a common food and an integral part of the everyday carbohydraterich diets of many population groups in poor countries. These populations also suffer from undernutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies – the hidden hunger. Small fish species, as well as the little oil, vegetables and spices with which they are cooked enhance diet diversity. Small fish are a rich source of animal protein, essential fatty acids, vitamins and minerals.

Performance of the Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia (GIFT) strain over ten generations of selection in Malaysia

A selection programme using Best Linear Unbiased Prediction (BLUP) method for the estimation of genetic merit was implemented by the Department of Fisheries Malaysia (DOF) in collaboration with the WorldFish Centre. This collaborative programme provided opportunities for further improvement of the GIFT strain in Malaysia. The overall aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of GIFT strain during the long-term selection programme in Malaysia.

An overview of the socioeconomic status of fisheries in Malaysia

Fish production in Malaysia increased steadily at 4.5% per annum from 801 000 t in 1985 to 1 280 906 t in 1997. Most of the production was contributed by marine capture fisheries, amounting to 1 168 973 t (91% of total production) in 1997, while the rest (132 700 t or 8%) came from inland fisheries and aquaculture. About 72% of the marine landings, or 837 574 t, were from Peninsular Malaysia while the rest were from the states of Sabah, Sarawak, and the Federal Territory Labuan.

Out of the factory and into the fish pond: can certification transform Vietnamese Pangasius?

This chapter examines pangasius catfish aquaculture in Vietnam in the context of changing social relations of production, European consumer trends and regulation. In particular we are interested in how the rise of 'sociotechnical' environmental regulatory networks in the form of quality standards and third-party certififcation have altered power relations between consumers and producers across global space.

Observations on freshwater aquaculture and extension in Malaysia, Thailand, Japan and Taiwan

As part of the Philippines' plan to accelerate the country's rate of aquaculture development, a study team was sent to neighboring Southeast Asian countries to observe advances for improving and developing aquaculture in the Philippines. The 3-man team, of which the author was a member, toured Malaysia, Thailand, Japan, and Taiwan. This article is a brief account of observations from the trip and interviews with authorities from selected fisheries agencies, with emphasis on freshwater aquaculture.

Multivariate models of tilapia and carp growth as an application of microcomputers in aquaculture research

An examination is made of the applications of microcomputers to aquaculture research, considering in particular data storage and processing and also statistical analysis programmes. Reference is made to development projects with the aim of making use of modern, applied research methods to develop aquaculture technologies applicable for developing countries.

Meeting the food and nutrition needs of the poor: the role of fish and the opportunities and challenges emerging from the rise of aquaculture

People who are food and nutrition insecure largely reside in Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa and for many, fish represents a rich source of protein, micronutrients and essential fatty acids. The contribution of fish to household food and nutrition security depends upon availability, access and cultural and personal preferences. Access is largely determined by location, seasonality and price but at the individual level it also depends upon a person's physiological and health status and how fish is prepared, cooked and shared among household members.

Market potential and challenges for expanding the production of sea cucumber in South-East Asia

The marketing system for sea cucumber in South-East Asia is generally inefficient, and marketing channels are multilayered. Information asymmetry encourages proliferation of redundant players in the distribution system, while high transaction costs keep the overall marketing margin high but the price received by collectors low. This paper is limited to establishing the major features of the marketing system for sea cucumber in South-East Asia.


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