Protecting small-scale farmers: a reality within a globalized economy?

Aquaculture is still the fastest-growing food-producing sector and plays an important role in enhancing global food security and alleviating poverty. Tens of millions of people are engaged in aquaculture production, the majority of whom are small-scale farmers who have limited resources and are faced with difficulties due to increasing globalization and the resultant trade liberalization of aquaculture products. Despite these challenges, small-scale farmers remain innovative and continue to contribute to global aquaculture production.

A preliminary assessment of the coastal fishery resources in India: socioeconomic and bioeconomic perspective

India is endowed with a continental shelf of 0.5 million km2 and an exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of about 2 million km2. Almost half (39%) of the Indian population utilizes the marine fisheries resources. India ranked sixth worldwide in total fish production (4.95 million t) and second in inland fish production (2.24 million t) during 1995 - 96. Fish production expanded from 0.75 million t in 1950 - 51 to 4.95 million t in 1995 - 96, giving a significant increase at a cumulative growth rate of 4.2% per annum.

A preliminary analysis on the socioeconomic situation of coastal fishing communities in Vietnam

Fish production in Vietnam increased rapidly from 420 000 t in 1981 to 1 130 680 t in 1998. Likewise, there was an expansion in the number of motorized fishing boats from 29 584 units with an average horsepower (HP) of 19.8 boat-1 in 1981 to 71 800 units with an average HP of 26.2 in 1998. In 1995, fish production was valued at VN$2 475 billion (US$0.02 billion at 1 US$ = 11 041 VN$; source: oanda. com).

A practical guide for ex-ante impact evaluation in fisheries and aquaculture

This guide provides a framework for ex-ante evaluation of fisheries and aquaculture projects in developing countries. Ex-ante impact evaluations check the potential of a project or program to deliver benefits from proposed interventions. Providing extensive annotated literature citations, this guide is designed for use by practitioners who may not be fisheries or aquaculture specialists.

The potential of nutrient-rich small fish species in aquaculture to improve human nutrition and health

Small fish are a common food and an integral part of the everyday carbohydraterich diets of many population groups in poor countries. These populations also suffer from undernutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies – the hidden hunger. Small fish species, as well as the little oil, vegetables and spices with which they are cooked enhance diet diversity. Small fish are a rich source of animal protein, essential fatty acids, vitamins and minerals.

Philippine Brackishwater Aquaculture Training Project

The Brackishwater Aquaculture Development and Training Project, a cooperative effort of the Government of the Philippines, represented by the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) under the Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), became operational in April 1977. The author was project leader, representing FAO/UNDP until the project was completed in early 1983.

An overview of the socioeconomic status of fisheries in Malaysia

Fish production in Malaysia increased steadily at 4.5% per annum from 801 000 t in 1985 to 1 280 906 t in 1997. Most of the production was contributed by marine capture fisheries, amounting to 1 168 973 t (91% of total production) in 1997, while the rest (132 700 t or 8%) came from inland fisheries and aquaculture. About 72% of the marine landings, or 837 574 t, were from Peninsular Malaysia while the rest were from the states of Sabah, Sarawak, and the Federal Territory Labuan.

Overview of sea cucumber aquaculture and sea-ranching research in the South-East Asian region

South-East Asia has traditionally been the global centre of production of tropical sea cucumbers for Chinese markets. Early research into culture methods took place outside this region, notably in India, the Pacific region and China. However, recent investment in Holothuria scabra (sandfish) culture has led to some significant advances within this region. The Philippines and Vietnam have been at the forefront of recent efforts, with involvement from substantial national programs and local institutions as well as international donors and scientific organisations.

Observations on freshwater aquaculture and extension in Malaysia, Thailand, Japan and Taiwan

As part of the Philippines' plan to accelerate the country's rate of aquaculture development, a study team was sent to neighboring Southeast Asian countries to observe advances for improving and developing aquaculture in the Philippines. The 3-man team, of which the author was a member, toured Malaysia, Thailand, Japan, and Taiwan. This article is a brief account of observations from the trip and interviews with authorities from selected fisheries agencies, with emphasis on freshwater aquaculture.

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