The Current status of aquaculture and aquafeed production in Bangladesh

Over the last decade, dramatic increases in the production of a variety of species from commercial aquaculture systems and sharp increases in per capita fish consumption have occurred in Bangladesh. This transition has been made possible by widespread adoption of semi-intensive and intensive production practices, accompanied by growth in the production and use of aquafeeds. Findings relating to the current status of aquaculture in Bangladesh have been reported in greater detail elsewhere.

Cultivation and propagation of mullet (Mugil so-iuy) in China

Details are given of the process of cultivation of mullet (Mugil so-iuy ) used in China, describing the guiding of fry into ponds, harvesting, overwintering, production, disease and predators. Artificial breeding is also discussed, indicating the source and selection of mature fish, hormones and dosages, fertilization and incubation and larval rearing.

Considerations about effective dissemination of improved fish strains

Aquaculture production systems in developing countries are largely based on the use of unimproved species and strains. As knowledge and experience are accumulated in relation to the management, feeding and animal health issues of such production systems, the availability of genetically more productive stock becomes imperative in order to more effectively use resources. For instance, there is little point in providing ideal water conditions and optimum feed quality to fish that do not have the potential to grow faster and to be harvested on time, providing a product of the desired quality.

Comparative study of the reproductive performance and White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) status of black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) collected from the Bay of Bengal

A comparative study to assess length, weight, fecundity, hatching rate and White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) prevalence in black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) brood collected from shallow and deep water zones of the Bay of Bengal was carried out in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. Average size and reproductive performance of brood from the deep zone was significantly higher than in brood caught from the shallow zone. The incidence of WSSV infection in shallow zone brood was much higher than in deep zone brood. The association between depth zone and WSSV infection is independent of brood size.

Community management as part of the inland capture fisheries strategy in Bangladesh

Bangladesh has had comprehensive experience of community based management for inland capture fisheries from several projects (revenue and externally funded) over the last 10 to 15 years. The lessons were extensively used for the elaboration of a strategy and a programme, which will seek to consolidate gains in and expansion of community based management linked to institutional and legal reform and a recognition and strengthening of the roles of civil society and the private sector. The Ministry of Fisheries and Livestock adopted the National Fisheries Strategy in January 2006.

Can aquaculture benefit the extreme poor? A case study of landless and socially marginalized Adivasi (ethnic) communities in Bangladesh

The Adivasi Fisheries Project, aimed at diversifying livelihood options for resource-poor Adivasi (ethnic) communities in the North and Northwest of Bangladesh, was implemented during 2007–9. Aquaculture and related technologies were introduced to a total of 3,594 resource-poor Adivasi households. Baseline and end-line surveys were applied to assess the changes in their livelihoods following intervention.

Brunei fisheries and research

The existing fisheries in Brunei are almost entirely artisanal, using traditional gear. Stock assessment is discussed and the potential for aquaculture considered. Some of the problems in the fisheries are related to the extensive oil and natural gas industry but the greatest problem is that of red tides, which are a constraint not only in the development of the bivalve shellfish industry but also in the utilization of some fish resources there, at least during the bloom periods.

Brackishwater pond development in Sumatra

In 1976 the Government of Indonesia began a brackish water pond (tambak) development project on the east coast of the north Sumatra provinces Aceh and North Sumatra. Strategic outputs for the 2 province projects are listed. It was decided that polyculture of milkfish (Chanos chanos ) and shrimp (Penaeus monodon ) would be promoted as the most realistic of several possibilities. A mini-estate pilot project was undertaken in order to determine how the tambak expansion could be conducted in an orderly way, both technically and economically sound.

Brackishwater aquaculture: threat to the environment

Details are given of developments in the Philippines regarding the conversion of mangrove forests intobrackishwater fishponds, considering in particular environmental implications. Social and human costs and ecological costs are examined. The effects of increased stocking densities and of the use of chemicals and drugs on the pond ecosystems are discussed. Recommendations are given regarding measures to be taken for the conservation and management of the environment.


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