Training manual on improved prawn-carp polyculture and dyke cropping in Gher system

Due to inadequate technical knowledge and training in advanced methods of gradually growing tilapia culture, framers are not getting expected yield. From the very beginning of the CSISA-BD project, WoldFish Center has taken initiative to introduce advanced methods in tilapia culture. To do this, the shortage of skilled trainers and training materials, has, particularly, been realized. Presently, a number of manuals on tilapia culture from Department of Fisheries, Bangladesh Fisheries Research Institute, WorldFish Center and different GOs and NGOs are available.

Timor-Leste national aquaculture development strategy 2012-2030

The Timor-Leste National Aquaculture Development Strategy (2012–2030) provides a framework for future responsible development of the aquaculture sector in the country. The strategy is anchored to the underlying principles of combating widespread poverty and malnutrition and for effective ecosystem management in the country. The development of the National Aquaculture Strategy involved consultation meetings with agro-ecological, social, economic, and institutional aspects.

Technical characteristics and economic performance of commercial Tilapia hatcheries applying different management systems in Egypt

This study was carried out in order to understand the technical and economic characteristics of different Egyptian Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) hatchery systems. Hatchery operators at fifty tilapia hatcheries in four governorates were interviewed and four focus group discussions were held with 61 participants in March 2012.

Strengthening governance across scales in aquatic agricultural systems

Aquatic agricultural systems in developing countries face increasing competition from multiple stakeholders operating from local to national and regional scales over rights to access and use natural resources—land, water, wetlands, and fisheries—essential to rural livelihoods. A key implication is the need to strengthen governance to enable equitable decision-making amidst such competition, building capacities for resilience and transformations that reduce poverty.

Smallholder aquaculture: sustaining the impact of private investment

The growth of aquaculture - now the fastest growing food production system in the world - is increasingly attracting private investment. Much of this investment, however, is in larger enterprises and input services such as feed, seed and processing. Little is targeted at smallholder farmers who, as a result, continue to face constraints in accessing finance, technology and markets. In 2010, WorldFish set out to explore the business case for investment in smallholder aquaculture by examining several donor funded projects.

Small-scale aquaculture: Global and national perspectives

Fish has been a staple food for over a billion people. Its demand is increasing due to growing population and awareness about health benefits of aquatic animal food. Disappointingly, wild catch worldwide is on the decline and aquaculture is emerging as the only solution. It grew at 9%/yr in the last 10 years becoming the fastest growing food production sector. At present, aquaculture produces only about 45 million t per year but it needs to be doubled by 2030 to meet its growing demand. Asia produces over 85% of the global farmed fish - mostly by small-scale farmers.

Small-scale aquaculture, development and poverty: a reassessment

The potential of small-scale aquaculture (SSA) to contribute to development goals including poverty reduction and improved food security has been widely discussed. These accounts emphasize the following characteristics of SSA: the relative poverty of practising households; the subsistence or semi-subsistence nature of the activity; its role as a means of agricultural diversification; its contribution to food security; family ownership and operation of production or reliance on predominantly family labour; and utilization of small areas of land and/or water.

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