Community management as part of the inland capture fisheries strategy in Bangladesh

Bangladesh has had comprehensive experience of community based management for inland capture fisheries from several projects (revenue and externally funded) over the last 10 to 15 years. The lessons were extensively used for the elaboration of a strategy and a programme, which will seek to consolidate gains in and expansion of community based management linked to institutional and legal reform and a recognition and strengthening of the roles of civil society and the private sector. The Ministry of Fisheries and Livestock adopted the National Fisheries Strategy in January 2006.

The characteristics and status of pond aquaculture in Bangladesh

Very rapid developments are widely believed to have occurred within Bangladesh's aquaculture sector in recent years, but have yet to be adequately documented. This paper addresses the information gap based on a comprehensive review of literature and data. The current status of pond based aquaculture in Bangladesh is summarized in terms of the quantities and species of fish produced and the technical and social characteristics of the production systems from which they originate.

Carrying capacities and site selection within the ecosystem approach to aquaculture

The growth in world aquaculture required to meet the demands of society will result in ever-increasing pressure upon aquatic and terrestrial resources. There are also potential consequences on the environment and on biodiversity, as well as inevitable societal impacts. There is growing adoption of aspects of the ecosystem approach to aquaculture (EAA), which takes a holistic view of the developments in the sector in an attempt to enable sustainable growth while avoiding negative effects.

Can the global adoption of genetically improved farmed fish increase beyond 10%, and how?

The annual production from global aquaculture has increased rapidly from 2.6 million tons or 3.9% of the total supply of fish, shellfish and mollusks in 1970, to 66.7 million tons or 42.2% in 2012, while capture fisheries have more or less leveled out at about 90 million tons per year since the turn of the century. Consequently, the future seafood supply is likely to depend on a further increase of aquaculture production. Unlike terrestrial animal farming, less than 10% of the aquaculture production comes from domesticated and selectively bred farm stocks.

Cage-pond integration of African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) with carps

Cage-pond integration system is a new model for enhancing productivity of pond aquaculture system. A field trial was conducted using African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in cages and carps in earthen ponds. This study aimed to assess the production and profitability of different cage-pond integration models of Nile tilapia and African catfish with carps under farmers’ conditions and to recommend the best ones for adoption in Nepal.

A bright future for fish farming

It is highly unlikely that wild capture fisheries will be able to produce higher yields in future. For aquaculture the opposite is the case. No other food production sector has grown as fast over the past 20 years. Aquaculture is expected to satisfy the growing world population’s demand for fish – and at the same time protect ocean fish stocks. Hopes are pinned on farming as an alternative to over-fishing. But the use of copious amounts of feed derived from wild fish, the destruction of mangrove forests and the use of antibiotics have given fish farming a bad name.

Beyond net deficits: new priorities for an aquacultural geography

Geographers first identified aquaculture as an important field of study during the 1990s, pointing to a ‘net deficit’ in geographical knowledge about the activity. This paper examines how far geographers have come in bridging this knowledge deficit in the last 20 years. While increasing attention has focused on the political economy of export products consumed in the global North, ‘everyday’ geographies of aquaculture production and consumption in the global South have been neglected.

Asia–Pacific tropical sea cucumber aquaculture

ACIAR, in collaboration with the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), organised a symposium on tropical sea cucumber aquaculture at SPC Headquarters in Noumea, New Caledonia, in February 2011. Although the principal focus was on ACIAR work, particularly in the Asia–Pacific region, researchers from other parts of the world were invited to provide additional expertise. The symposium identified knowledge gaps and highlighted researchable topics for future developments in sea cucumber aquaculture.

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