Annual report 2014/2015

Today, fish is recognized as a global superfood, providing nutrients and micronutrients that are essential to cognitive and physical development, especially in children, and is an important part of a healthy diet. Globally, 3 billion people rely on fish for almost 20% of their animal protein. And demand for fish is increasing. Projections suggest that we will have a 68–78 million metric ton shortfall of fish by 2030. This will be especially acute in sub-Saharan Africa, where aquaculture has yet to fully develop and where fish consumption is projected to decline.

Analysis of the retailer value chain segment in five governorates

This study is the third output of the SDC-funded “Improving Employment and Income through Development of Egyptian Aquaculture” (IEIDEAS), a three-year project being jointly implemented by the WorldFish Center and CARE International in Egypt with support from the Ministry of Agriculture and Land Reclamation. The aim of the study is to gather data on the retailer segment of the aquaculture value chain in Egypt, namely on the employment and market conditions of the women fish retailers in the five target governorates.

Analysis of bio-resource utilization in integrated agriculture-aquaculture farming systems in Zomba District, Southern Malawi

A bio-resource flow analysis using participatory resource mapping was conducted in Chingale Area, west of Zomba District in southern Malawi. The analysis was aimed at providing the basis for designing an integrated agriculture-aquaculture system that would optimize utilization of on-farm resources for a cost effective aquaculture production system. Results showed that Chingale has over 18 crop species and five animal species that have potential for integration into the farming system.

Algal bioproducts derived from suspended solids in intensive land-based aquaculture

Land-based aquaculture produces suspended solids in culture pond and settlement pond waters that could be harvested as a bioresource. The first aim of this study is to quantify, characterise, and subsequently harvest the suspended solids from two discharge waste streams in pond-based intensive aquaculture. The second aim is to quantify the fatty acid profile of harvested biomass (suspended solids) and evaluate its potential as a bioproduct in aquaculture feeds and nutraceuticals.

Zooplankton: its biochemistry and significance in aquaculture.

Zooplankton are an important food source for many species of fish. They can provide an inexpensive alternative to other commercial feeds. Zooplankton have several advantages, among them a faster growth and greater feed efficiency for some species. The flavor and texture of fish are also improved with zooplankton as feed. Further research is needed on the chemical composition of zooplankton, the development of zooplankton-based dry diets and the effects of the replacement of fish meal with zooplankton meal for commercial aquaculture species.

WorldFish report 2010/11

This year's report contains the Director General's and Chairman's statements illustrating the major thrust of and progress with the approved 2011 strategy. It incorporates details of the financial statement for the past year. There are highlights from projects covering the enhancement of coastal fisheries, livelihood in the Philippines, programs on lake fisheries in Malawi, to capacity building in terms of long term training for local partners and stakeholders.

Wall-to-wall fieldwork: some guidelines for secondary data collection in developing countries.

A discussion is presented on the usefulness of secondary data in research in the field of agriculture, considering implications for the fisheries and aquaculture sectors. Four categories of secondary data are examined -- policy and development trends, food production, marketing, and food consumption. Guidelines are provided to help determine which type of data are most likely to be found.

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