The Asian Fisheries Social Science Research Network

The main objective of the Asian Fisheries Social Science Research Network is to build national research capacity to deal with important socio-economic issues in the management of the complex tropical fisheries of the SoutheastAsian region and in the development of the aquaculture industry. Details are given of the Network CommitteeResearch Reports available and workshops and training courses.

Aquaculture

Biophysical impacts of aquaculture, with consequences for biodiversity, vary with species and culture systems and include issues such as: nutrient enrichment/removal, chemicals, land use, species introductions, genetic flow to wild populations, disturbance of balance or introduction of pathogen/parasites, consumption of capture fishery resources, energy, and greenhouse gas emissions. Guiding principles, labeling schemes and various tools are needed to analyze performance and conformance.

Annual report 2014/2015

Today, fish is recognized as a global superfood, providing nutrients and micronutrients that are essential to cognitive and physical development, especially in children, and is an important part of a healthy diet. Globally, 3 billion people rely on fish for almost 20% of their animal protein. And demand for fish is increasing. Projections suggest that we will have a 68–78 million metric ton shortfall of fish by 2030. This will be especially acute in sub-Saharan Africa, where aquaculture has yet to fully develop and where fish consumption is projected to decline.

Analysis of the retailer value chain segment in five governorates

This study is the third output of the SDC-funded “Improving Employment and Income through Development of Egyptian Aquaculture” (IEIDEAS), a three-year project being jointly implemented by the WorldFish Center and CARE International in Egypt with support from the Ministry of Agriculture and Land Reclamation. The aim of the study is to gather data on the retailer segment of the aquaculture value chain in Egypt, namely on the employment and market conditions of the women fish retailers in the five target governorates.

Alleviating poverty through aquaculture: progress, opportunities and improvements

Significant changes in our understanding of the interrelationships between aquaculture and poverty have occurred in the last decade. In particular, there is a growing realization that the impacts of aquaculture need to be assessed from a value-chain perspective rather than through a narrow production focus. In recent years, understandings of poverty and the forms, outcomes and importance of aquaculture have also shifted. Terms in current use are first clarified, including those related to scale and location of aquaculture.

Adapting tropical Pacific fisheries and aquaculture to climate change: management measures, policies and investments

The main purpose of this book is to assess how changes projected to occur under low (B1) and high (A2) emissions scenarios in 2035 and 2100 could derail plans by the Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs) to use the sustainable benefits of fisheries and aquaculture to foster economic development, government revenue, food security and livelihoods.

WorldFish report 2009/10

The stories included in this WorldFish Annual Report illustrate how change is inevitable and that with dialogue and shared understanding we can make a difference to the poor and hungry. The report shows the variety of approaches for achieving these goals set in early 2009, from adopting better aquaculture practices, to highlighting the nutritional benefits of eating fish, to strengthening community and ecosystem resilience and adaptive capacity.

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