The Blue revolution in Asia: Upgrading and governance in aquaculture value chains

In this article, the authors examine the upgrading trajectories of selected aquaculture value chains in four Asian countries and the links between upgrading and three factors of value chain governance: coordination mechanisms; types of drivers; and domestic regulation. We find instances of improving products, processes, and value chain coordination—while “moving up” the value chain is rare. They also find that the type of value chain driver and the quality of the domestic regulatory framework are main facilitators of upgrading.

Beyond net deficits: new priorities for an aquacultural geography

Geographers first identified aquaculture as an important field of study during the 1990s, pointing to a ‘net deficit’ in geographical knowledge about the activity. This paper examines how far geographers have come in bridging this knowledge deficit in the last 20 years. While increasing attention has focused on the political economy of export products consumed in the global North, ‘everyday’ geographies of aquaculture production and consumption in the global South have been neglected.

Baseline survey final report: Aquaculture for income and nutrition project

The World Fish Center, in collaboration with the GOB and USAID, has been implementing the FtF Aquaculture Project since October 2011 with a view to meet the government and FtF goals to sustainably reduce poverty and hunger. The project is funded by the USAID FtF initiative and covers a 5-year intervention in aquaculture focused on 20 southern districts in of the country.

Asset or liability? Aquaculture in a natural disaster prone area

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the role of aquaculture in improving a family's ability to cope with disasters like cyclones. Small-scale aquaculture is expanding in deltas globally. This work, therefore, seeks to better understand the role of such household assets in one particularly vulnerable region; coastal Bangladesh. Benefits and the potential contribution of aquaculture towards surviving after a catastrophe are explored.

Assessment of the carp seeds value chain in Southern Bangladesh

The Aquaculture for Income and Nutrition (AIN) project implemented by World Fish and funded by USAID, aims at increasing aquaculture production in 20 districts of Southern Bangladesh (Greater Khulna, Greater Barisal, Greater Jessore and Greater Faridpur) to reduce poverty and enhance nutritional status. As part of its initial scoping activities World Fish commissioned this value chain assessment on the market chains of carp fish seed (spawn, fry and fingerlings) in the southern region of Bangladesh.

Asia–Pacific tropical sea cucumber aquaculture

ACIAR, in collaboration with the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), organised a symposium on tropical sea cucumber aquaculture at SPC Headquarters in Noumea, New Caledonia, in February 2011. Although the principal focus was on ACIAR work, particularly in the Asia–Pacific region, researchers from other parts of the world were invited to provide additional expertise. The symposium identified knowledge gaps and highlighted researchable topics for future developments in sea cucumber aquaculture.

Aquaculture's unrealised potential: an ASARECA funded partnership learning programme for the fisheries sector

The potential of aquaculture to reduce poverty and hunger has been recognised in Africa. However, growth in the sector has been limited up-to-now, providing less than 2% of total fish production. In Eastern and Central Africa, the slow growth has been caused by a number of factors, including a development focus on resource poor farmers rather than small and medium enterprises, a lack of focus on the entire fish value chain (feed, seed, processing and marketing), as well as weak governance and policy environments.

Aquaculture and resilience: Women in aquaculture in Nepal

Farming-based rural livelihoods are becoming increasingly vulnerable to the effects of global climate change and sudden and profound changes in social and economic systems. Diversification of livelihood options is believed to be vital to maintaining ecosystem resilience and building social systems resilience. Integrated agriculture-aquaculture (IAA) farming systems, considered among the promising options for small-scale farming households in China and Vietnam, are likely be relevant in the context of mixed crop- livestock farming systems elsewhere as well.

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