Economic and social impacts of Integrated Aquaculture-Agriculture technologies in Bangladesh

This study estimated the adoption rate of integrated aquaculture-agriculture (IAA) technologies in Bangladesh and their impact on poverty and fish and food consumption in adopting households. We used a novel, simulation-based approach to impact assessment called Tradeoff Analysis for Multi-Dimensional Impact Assessment (TOA-MD).

Does size matter? Reassessing the relationship between aquaculture and poverty in Bangladesh

Aquaculture has long been promoted by development institutions in Bangladesh on the understanding that it can alleviate poverty. Most of this attention has focused on forms of the activity commonly referred to as ‘small-scale’. This article draws on concepts from the literature on agricultural growth and elaborates a typology of aquaculture based on relations of production which suggests that, in Bangladesh, quasi-capitalist forms of aquaculture may possess greater potential to reduce poverty and enhance food security than the quasi-peasant modes of production generally assumed to do so.

Decision support for water management for integrating aquaculture in small-scale irrigation systems: A case for the Chingale catchment in Malawi

A three-year project was funded by the BMZ/GIZ to examine the benefits of integrating aquaculture and small scale irrigation by identifying improved water allocation and management strategies under current and future climate change scenarios. An integrated modeling approach was adopted to analyze the complex issues involved in the decision processes. A water budgeting approach was used in estimating and balancing the water resources available to farming communities (the supply aspect) and the water demand for agricultural use, including crops and fish farming, within a catchment.

Culture, social relations and private sector development in the Thai and Vietnamese fish hatchery sectors

This paper provides a comparative analysis of the social and cultural dimensions of fish hatchery development in Vietnam and Thailand. Two detailed case studies highlight the importance of a variety of culturally mediated, informal interpersonal relationships in facilitating the establishment of new hatchery enterprises. The analysis reveals that in both Vietnam and Thailand, informal relationships are extremely effective conduits for the transfer of productive technologies from public institutions to private entrepreneurs and for the subsequent development of private enterprises.

Cultivation and propagation of mullet (Mugil so-iuy) in China

Details are given of the process of cultivation of mullet (Mugil so-iuy ) used in China, describing the guiding of fry into ponds, harvesting, overwintering, production, disease and predators. Artificial breeding is also discussed, indicating the source and selection of mature fish, hormones and dosages, fertilization and incubation and larval rearing.

Cooperation in aquaculture rehabilitation and development in Aceh, Indonesia

Post-tsunami rehabilitation and reconstruction activities in Aceh have been criticised as focusing on vertical reporting at the expense of lateral coordination, leading in some cases to ‘overlaps and redundancies, mistargeting and hastily planned and implemented programs’. Our experience is that effective coordination between implementing agencies, linked to appropriate Indonesian government agencies, can effectively improve the delivery of services, in this case to coastal aquaculture farmers in Aceh.

Constraints to aquaculture extension in rural Africa

An examination is made of problems involved in the extension of aquaculture in traditional villages in Malawi.Aquaculture is relatively new in the country and requires technical support from very competent personnel who are highly trained in specialized institutions. Extension depends upon effective communication, which is very difficult inthe traditional environments in rural Africa due to the different social structures.

Considerations about effective dissemination of improved fish strains

Aquaculture production systems in developing countries are largely based on the use of unimproved species and strains. As knowledge and experience are accumulated in relation to the management, feeding and animal health issues of such production systems, the availability of genetically more productive stock becomes imperative in order to more effectively use resources. For instance, there is little point in providing ideal water conditions and optimum feed quality to fish that do not have the potential to grow faster and to be harvested on time, providing a product of the desired quality.

Comparative study of the reproductive performance and White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) status of black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) collected from the Bay of Bengal

A comparative study to assess length, weight, fecundity, hatching rate and White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) prevalence in black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) brood collected from shallow and deep water zones of the Bay of Bengal was carried out in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. Average size and reproductive performance of brood from the deep zone was significantly higher than in brood caught from the shallow zone. The incidence of WSSV infection in shallow zone brood was much higher than in deep zone brood. The association between depth zone and WSSV infection is independent of brood size.

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