Considerations about effective dissemination of improved fish strains

Aquaculture production systems in developing countries are largely based on the use of unimproved species and strains. As knowledge and experience are accumulated in relation to the management, feeding and animal health issues of such production systems, the availability of genetically more productive stock becomes imperative in order to more effectively use resources. For instance, there is little point in providing ideal water conditions and optimum feed quality to fish that do not have the potential to grow faster and to be harvested on time, providing a product of the desired quality.

Comparative study of the reproductive performance and White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) status of black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) collected from the Bay of Bengal

A comparative study to assess length, weight, fecundity, hatching rate and White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) prevalence in black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) brood collected from shallow and deep water zones of the Bay of Bengal was carried out in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. Average size and reproductive performance of brood from the deep zone was significantly higher than in brood caught from the shallow zone. The incidence of WSSV infection in shallow zone brood was much higher than in deep zone brood. The association between depth zone and WSSV infection is independent of brood size.

Community management as part of the inland capture fisheries strategy in Bangladesh

Bangladesh has had comprehensive experience of community based management for inland capture fisheries from several projects (revenue and externally funded) over the last 10 to 15 years. The lessons were extensively used for the elaboration of a strategy and a programme, which will seek to consolidate gains in and expansion of community based management linked to institutional and legal reform and a recognition and strengthening of the roles of civil society and the private sector. The Ministry of Fisheries and Livestock adopted the National Fisheries Strategy in January 2006.

The characteristics and status of pond aquaculture in Bangladesh

Very rapid developments are widely believed to have occurred within Bangladesh's aquaculture sector in recent years, but have yet to be adequately documented. This paper addresses the information gap based on a comprehensive review of literature and data. The current status of pond based aquaculture in Bangladesh is summarized in terms of the quantities and species of fish produced and the technical and social characteristics of the production systems from which they originate.

Carrying capacities and site selection within the ecosystem approach to aquaculture

The growth in world aquaculture required to meet the demands of society will result in ever-increasing pressure upon aquatic and terrestrial resources. There are also potential consequences on the environment and on biodiversity, as well as inevitable societal impacts. There is growing adoption of aspects of the ecosystem approach to aquaculture (EAA), which takes a holistic view of the developments in the sector in an attempt to enable sustainable growth while avoiding negative effects.

Can aquaculture benefit the extreme poor? A case study of landless and socially marginalized Adivasi (ethnic) communities in Bangladesh

The Adivasi Fisheries Project, aimed at diversifying livelihood options for resource-poor Adivasi (ethnic) communities in the North and Northwest of Bangladesh, was implemented during 2007–9. Aquaculture and related technologies were introduced to a total of 3,594 resource-poor Adivasi households. Baseline and end-line surveys were applied to assess the changes in their livelihoods following intervention.

A bright future for fish farming

It is highly unlikely that wild capture fisheries will be able to produce higher yields in future. For aquaculture the opposite is the case. No other food production sector has grown as fast over the past 20 years. Aquaculture is expected to satisfy the growing world population’s demand for fish – and at the same time protect ocean fish stocks. Hopes are pinned on farming as an alternative to over-fishing. But the use of copious amounts of feed derived from wild fish, the destruction of mangrove forests and the use of antibiotics have given fish farming a bad name.

Baseline survey final report: Aquaculture for income and nutrition project

The World Fish Center, in collaboration with the GOB and USAID, has been implementing the FtF Aquaculture Project since October 2011 with a view to meet the government and FtF goals to sustainably reduce poverty and hunger. The project is funded by the USAID FtF initiative and covers a 5-year intervention in aquaculture focused on 20 southern districts in of the country.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Aquaculture