Fisheries in transition: Food and nutrition security implications for the global South

Fisheries and fish supply are undergoing a fundamental structural transition, as indicated by a ten country analysis. Aquaculture now provides around half the fish for direct human consumption and is set to grow further, but capture fisheries continue to make essential contributions to food and nutrition security throughout the global South. Capture fisheries provide diverse, nutritionally valuable fish and fish products which are often culturally preferred and easily accessed by the poor.

Fisheries and aquaculture policy for education, research and extension in Nepal

Fisheries and aquaculture policy for education, research and extension is derivatives of the main national agriculture policy. Fisheries and aquaculture is a dynamic sub-sector of agriculture sector having high growth potential but with low organizational stature in Nepal. The modern aquaculture along with fisheries practices contributes nearly 1% of Gross Domestic Production (GDP) and 2.68% of Agriculture Gross Domestic Production (AGDP).

Exploitation and conservation of fish genetic resources in Africa: issues and priorities for aquaculture development and research

Africa harbours a rich biological diversity of native fish resources. Recognition of the potential to use these resources to make significant contributions towards improving African food security through aquaculture has existed for some time. A key challenge, however, is achieving compatibility between the two urgent, but sometimes conflicting, goals of reducing poverty and food insecurity in Africa through aquaculture development while paying due attention to the conservation of natural biodiversity and fish genetic resources (FiGR).

Evaluation of the use of fresh water by four Egyptian farms applying integrated aquaculture-agriculture: study report

This report describes a study done in 2010 by researchers of the WorldFish Center on water use in Egyptian farms that apply aquaculture – agriculture integration. Two of the four farms that were monitored derived the main income from farming and selling fish, the two other farms were mainly agricultural farms that used reservoirs that were built to store irrigation water for growing fish. The volume of water in which fish were raised from fingerling to market size and that was subsequently used to irrigate agriculture crops was estimated.

Engaging the private sector to address conflict in natural resource management

International investments in agroindustry present a growing source of tension for local populations who rely on land, forests, water and fisheries for their livelihoods, particularly where local tenure security is put at risk. For governments, civil society organizations and the communities directly affected, engaging the private sector early is critical in order to avoid an escalation of conflict and to build collaboration that can yield dividends for all. Yet care must be taken to address power differences among actors and to avoid manipulation by individuals or interest groups.

Eco-certification of farmed seafood: will it make a difference?

Eco-certification is widely considered a tool for reducing environmental impacts of aquaculture, but what are the likely environmental outcomes for the world’s fastest growing animal-food production sector? This article analyzes a number of eco-certification schemes based on species choice, anticipated share of the global seafood market, size of eligible producers, and targeted environmental impacts.

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