Program proposal

The overall goal of the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems is to improve the well-being of aquatic agricultural system-dependent peoples. The Program will focus initially on three aquatic agricultural systems: (i) Asia‘s mega deltas, targeting Bangladesh and Cambodia; (ii) Asia-Pacific islands, targeting the Philippines and Solomons; and (iii) African freshwater systems, targeting first Zambia, then Uganda and Mali.

Mangrove ecosystem services and the potential for carbon revenue programmes in Solomon Islands

Mangroves are an imperilled biome whose protection and restoration through payments for ecosystem services (PES) can contribute to improved livelihoods, climate mitigation and adaptation. Interviews with resource users in three Solomon Islands villages suggest a strong reliance upon mangrove goods for subsistence and cash, particularly for firewood, food and building materials. Village-derived economic data indicates a minimum annual subsistence value from mangroves of US$ 345–1501 per household.

Aquatic Agricultural Systems

More than 700 million people depend on aquatic agricultural systems for their livelihoods. These are diverse farming systems that include a mix of cultivation, livestock, aquaculture, fishing, and gathering natural resources such as fruits, seeds, timber and wildlife. However, there are many constraints that prevent low income smallholders from fully benefitting from these naturally productive systems. The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems starts from the premise that poverty is rarely caused solely by inadequate income or assets.

Harnessing the development potential of aquatic agricultural systems for the poor and vulnerable: CGIAR Research Program 1.3

Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) are widely distributed along the world's rivers and coasts. These are generally highly productive systems but multiple constraints limit the ability of poor smallholder families to harness this productivity in the form of improved food, nutrition and income. To help overcome these constraints and harness the full development potential of aquatic agricultural systems, a new action research program has been developed by the CGIAR. This research program brief highlights the key messages of this new initiative.

CGIAR Research Program. Aquatic agricultural systems

Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) are widely distributed along the world's rivers and coasts. These are generally highly productive systems but multiple constraints limit the ability of poor smallholder families to harness this productivity in the form of improved food, nutrition and income. To help overcome these constraints and harness the full development potential of aquatic agricultural systems, a new action research program has been developed by the CGIAR. This research program brief highlights the key messages of this new initiative.

Aquatic agricultural systems in Zambia

Zambia contains 40% of Southern Africa’s surface freshwater and seasonally almost 20% of the country (150,000 km²) is inundated. Zambia’s rivers, lakes and wetlands support extensive agriculture, fisheries and livestock production, and contribute to the livelihoods of about 3 million people, almost 25% of the country’s population. These aquatic agricultural systems (AAS) are particularly important to poor people and provide significant opportunities for agriculture-based economic growth.

IAA Production Systems in Malawi

Southern Malawi is characterized by the Rift valley and the Shire Highlands, which are dominated by the Zomba and Mulanje plateaux, and the Kirk Range. These mountainous areas are a source of various rivers and streams, which support small-scale integrated agriculture-aquaculture systems (IAA). The IAA systems were introduced to Malawi in 1986 by the WorldFish Center when a range of IAA technologies were developed and disseminated to farmers. The most common IAA system consists of fishponds, vegetables, fish, rice and irrigated maize.

Zamaiso ye Zwezipili ya Litapi mwa Libala la Bulozi – Pizo ya ku eza sesiñwi ka putako

Batu ba ba pilela fa lika ze fumanwa mwa Libala la Bulozi, ba ba fumana sico ni buiketo bwa mubili ni moya, ba akalezwa ku fita fa palo ya bo lule ba mashumi a ketalizoho ka amabeli (70 000). Kono ki zamaiso ye maswe, ku yamba kwa swalelele ni ku itusisa lisebeliso za businyi ze fukulize litapi ka bubebe bo bu komokisa , mwa nako ye kuswani.

WorldFish annual report 2011/12

This year's report contains the Director General's and Chairman's statements. Also highlighted in the reports, are stories of projects with different partners: 1) CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) in Zambia. 2) Wetland Alliance project in the Mekong delta. 3) Projects with CARE, the humanitarian organisation in Egypt. 4) Tilapia breeding program with Water Research Institute (WRI) in Ghana. 5) Partnerships with the private sector on sustainable aquaculture enterprise in developing countries.

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