A rights-based perspective on adaptive capacity

Whilst it is increasingly recognised that socio-political contexts shape climate change adaptation decisions and actions at all scales, current modes of development typically fail to recognise or adequately challenge these contexts where they constrain capacity to adapt. To address this failing, the authors consider how a rights-based approach broadens understanding of adaptive capacity while directing attention towards causes of exclusion and marginalisation.

Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems: Program summary: Solomon Islands

The Program will achieve impact at multiple scales (household, community, province and national as well as amongst program countries) through pathways that include partnerships, knowledge sharing and learning. In Solomon Islands significant benefits will be achieved through direct engagement with partners, including communities in specific research sites in selected program hubs. Of a total population of just over half a million people, 75% of Solomon Islanders are subsistence-oriented small holder farmers and fishers.

Program Partnerships

Effective partnership is central to the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agriculture Systems (AAS). We recognize that many organizations are working to improve the lives of people living in aquatic agricultural systems, and together they spend hundreds of millions of dollars there each year.

Performance of mono-sex tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in rice field with different ditch size

The effects of ditch size on growth and production of mono-sex tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus in rain fed concurrent rice–fish system were technically and economically evaluated for a period of 4 months. Three different ditch sizes were tried: 5%, 10% and 15% of the total cultivable rice field. It is concluded that rice–fish farming in a rain fed ecosystem of Bangladesh with medium ditch size and stocking density of 5000 ha-1 mono-sex tilapia can achieve better economic return.

Participatory action research: Guide for facilitators

This guide is a resource document for the training and capacity building of facilitators who conduct participatory action research (PAR) in the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS). AAS aims to improve the lives of poor and vulnerable people reliant on aquatic and agricultural systems for their livelihoods, through collaborative, inclusive PAR with communities and other stakeholders.

Nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) for food security in Solomon Islands

Coastal fisheries are central to the lives of rural Solomon Island villages, supplying daily food and serving as one of the few sources of income. Yet, it is predicted that coastal fisheries in Solomon Islands, like many countries in the Pacific region, will not be able to provide enough fish to meet peoples’ needs by 2030. Proposed strategies to prevent this scenario include improving the management of coastal fisheries and diversifying sources of fish by enhancing access to other fishes, either through aquaculture or the use of fish aggregating devices (FAD).

Measuring gender transformative change

Agricultural research programs try to measure their contribution to a range of desired development outcomes, such as poverty reduction, food security, environmental sustainability and gender equality. This paper argues that the substantive measures (usually ‘indicators’) typically used to monitor these programs’ outcomes and impacts on gender equality are limited; they are unable to capture the full range of programmatic contributions towards the larger processes of change involved in achieving gender equality.

Learning from implementation of community selection in Zambia, Solomon Islands, and Bangladesh AAS hubs

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) is a research in development program which aims to foster innovation to respond to community needs, and through networking and social learning to bring about development outcomes and impact at scale. It aims to reach the poorest and most vulnerable communities that are dependent upon aquatic agricultural systems. AAS uses monitoring and evaluation to track progress along identified impact pathways for accountability and learning.

Innovations to strengthen aquatic resource governance on Cambodia’s Tonle Sap Lake

Cambodia’s recent freshwater fishery sector reform, instigated at the top level of government, is one of the country’s most significant contemporary policy developments addressing natural resources management and rural development. Implemented in two main waves, the reforms culminated in the complete removal of inland commercial fishing lots. Yet serious problems still need to be addressed, including reportedly widespread illegal fishing, difficulties in protecting critical habitats, and competition among state agencies over resource management authority.

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