Food security and the coral Triangle Initiative

The Asia-Pacific's Coral Triangle is defined by its extremely high marine biodiversity. Over one hundred million people living in its coastal zones use this biodiversity to support their livelihoods. Hundreds of millions more derive nutritious food directly from the region's marine resources and through local, regional and global trade. Biodiversity and its values to society are threatened by demographic and habitat change, rising demand, intensive harvesting and climate change.

Food and nutrition security in Solomon Islands

This report is a literature review on Food and Nutrition Security in Solomon Islands, based on data from surveys conducted by Solomon Islands National Statistical Office, as well as from national and international organizations working in Solomon Islands. The purpose of the report is to present information outlining the current food and nutrition situation in Solomon Islands before implementation of the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS), led by WorldFish.

Evaluation of the use of fresh water by four Egyptian farms applying integrated aquaculture-agriculture: study report

This report describes a study done in 2010 by researchers of the WorldFish Center on water use in Egyptian farms that apply aquaculture – agriculture integration. Two of the four farms that were monitored derived the main income from farming and selling fish, the two other farms were mainly agricultural farms that used reservoirs that were built to store irrigation water for growing fish. The volume of water in which fish were raised from fingerling to market size and that was subsequently used to irrigate agriculture crops was estimated.

Evaluating the flow regulating functions of natural ecosystems in the Zambezi River Basin

By mitigating the vagaries of climate variability, agricultural water storage is widely anticipated to make a key contribution to climate change adaptation in Africa. However, if the planning of water storage is not improved, it is likely that many investments will fail to fully deliver intended benefits. This report describes the agricultural water storage continuum and some of the possible implications of climate change.

Communication strategy

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) is one of the CGIAR’s 15 research programs. Through a program of participatory action research, referred to as “Research in Development”, the Program aims to improve the lives of the many millions of people who depend on aquatic agricultural systems. This Strategy will create the platform to capture, collect, produce, manage, brand and share information that is generated throughout the Program’s lifecycle.

Collaborative governance assessment

This Guidance Note presents a simple approach to analyzing the governance context for development of aquatic agricultural systems; it is intended as an aid to action research, and a contribution to effective program planning and evaluation. It provides a brief introduction to the value of assessing governance collaboratively, summarizes an analytical framework, and offers practical guidance on three stages of the process: identifying obstacles and opportunities, debating strategies for influence, and planning collaborative actions.

Collaborating for resilience in complex aquatic resource commons: Lessons for policy and practice

How can multi-stakeholder dialogue be used to assess and address the roots of environmental resource conflict in complex commons characterized by multiple levels of governance? This paper presents the results of a collaborative initiative aimed at strengthening aquatic resources governance in three ecoregions—Lake Victoria (Uganda), Lake Kariba (Zambia), and Tonle Sap Lake (Cambodia)— implemented from mid-2010 through early 2013.

CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems Roll-Out Handbook. Ver. 1.0. May, 2012

This handbook is a guide to procedures and practices that should be observed during hub roll-out by the teams coordinating the planning, implementation and reporting of the activities of the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS-CRP). Given that the program promises to change the way research in development is planned, implemented and reported, it is important that similar practices be observed from the start. This will assist later cross-hub comparisons.

Building coalitions, creating change: An agenda for gender transformative research in development workshop report. 3-5 October 2012.Penang, Malaysia

There is compelling evidence that increased gender equity can make a significant contribution towards alleviating poverty and increasing food security. But past efforts to integrate gender into agricultural research and development practice have failed to address the inequalities that limit women’s access to agricultural inputs, markets, resources and advice. A Gender Transformative Approach (GTA) goes beyond just considering the symptoms of gender inequality, and addresses the social norms, attitudes, behaviors and social systems that underlie them.

Aquaculture, employment, poverty, food security and well-being in Bangladesh: A comparative study

This study addresses five research questions about the nature of aquaculture development in Bangladesh. The questions are designed to test central narratives from the literature on aquaculture, poverty and food security, and to broaden the scope of debate beyond them An integrated quantitative-qualitative survey was conducted in six communities with contrasting patterns of aquaculture development.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Aquatic Agricultural Systems