Vulnerability of aquaculture in the tropical Pacific to climate change

In this chapter, the authors assess the vulnerability of aquaculture in the tropical Pacific to climate change. It begins by summarising recent and potential aquaculture production to set the scene for the sector, and then use the framework outlined in Chapter 1, based on exposure, sensitivity, potential impact and adaptive capacity, to evaluate the vulnerability of the main commodities for food security and livelihoods.

State of the Coral Triangle Reports

These publications, consisting of a Regional State of the Coral Triangle report with six corresponding country-level State of the Coral Triangle reports, identify key issues that decision makers must address if sustainable development of the Coral Triangle’s coastal and marine resources is to be achieved. The Regional State of the Coral Triangle report summarizes each country’s biophysical and socioeconomic characteristics, as well as their institutional framework for governing marine resource use.

Solomon Islands State of the Coral Triangle Report: Summary

The Solomon Islands National Plan of Action (SI-NPOA): Coral Triangle Initiative on Coral Reefs, Fisheries, and Food Security (CTI-CFF) provides visionary guidance for the management of coral reefs and related ecosystems in the Solomon Islands (Ministry of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and Meteorology and Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, 2010). It is consistent with the CTI Regional Plan of Action (RPOA), but also incorporates local situations and circumstances.

A rights-based perspective on adaptive capacity

Whilst it is increasingly recognised that socio-political contexts shape climate change adaptation decisions and actions at all scales, current modes of development typically fail to recognise or adequately challenge these contexts where they constrain capacity to adapt. To address this failing, the authors consider how a rights-based approach broadens understanding of adaptive capacity while directing attention towards causes of exclusion and marginalisation.

Reconceptualising adaptation to climate change as part of pathways of change and response

The need to adapt to climate change is now widely recognised as evidence of its impacts on social and natural systems grows and greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated. Yet efforts to adapt to climate change, as reported in the literature over the last decade and in selected case studies, have not led to substantial rates of implementation of adaptation actions despite substantial investments in adaptation science. Moreover, implemented actions have been mostly incremental and focused on proximate causes; there are far fewer reports of more systemic or transformative actions.

Responses to climate change: adaptation pathways to change

This project, Responding to Climate Change Using an Adaptation Pathways and Decision-making Approach, funded by the Asian Development Bank (ADB), aims to strengthen coastal and marine resource management in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific, by assisting communities in Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Timor Leste and Vanuatu to develop their own climate change adaptation implementation plans.

Planning the use of fish for food security in Solomon Islands

This study was funded through the USAID-supported Coral Triangle Support Partnership (CTSP). This study provides an insight into the changing demand for fish in the Solomon Islands over the next 20 years. It supports US CTI Indicator 3 — “Number of policies, laws, agreements, or regulations promoting sustainable natural resource management and conservation that are implemented as a result of USG assistance”.

Participatory action research on climate risk management, Bangladesh

The rural populations of southern Bangladesh are some of the most vulnerable communities in the world to the future impacts of climate change. They are particularly at risk from floods, waterlogged soils, and increasing salinity of both land and water. The objective of this project was to analyze the vulnerability of people in four villages that are experiencing different levels of soil salinity.

Mangrove ecosystem services and payments for blue carbon in Solomon Islands

The AusAID Development Research Project: Poverty Alleviation, Mangrove Conservation and Climate Change: Carbon offsets as payment for mangrove ecosystem services in Solomon Islands (# 49892) was designed to evaluate the potential for mangrove carbon revenue programs in Solomon Islands. The approach was to address three main questions: (1) How are mangrove ecosystem goods and services currently used and valued by coastal populations with a high reliance on a subsistence economy? (2) What is the total carbon stock held in mangrove ecosystems?

Limits to resilience from livelihood diversification and social capital in lake social–ecological systems

Diversity of both social networks and livelihood sources plays a central role in determining the sustainability of natural resource use and resilience of social–ecological systems, not least in resource-dependent economies. Yet the types of social capital and characteristics of diversity are not well understood. Here we examine social capital and livelihood diversification strategies in dynamic lakeshore social–ecological systems in Uganda adapting to climate variability and change.

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