Participatory action research on climate risk management, Bangladesh

The rural populations of southern Bangladesh are some of the most vulnerable communities in the world to the future impacts of climate change. They are particularly at risk from floods, waterlogged soils, and increasing salinity of both land and water. The objective of this project was to analyze the vulnerability of people in four villages that are experiencing different levels of soil salinity.

Mangrove ecosystem services and payments for blue carbon in Solomon Islands

The AusAID Development Research Project: Poverty Alleviation, Mangrove Conservation and Climate Change: Carbon offsets as payment for mangrove ecosystem services in Solomon Islands (# 49892) was designed to evaluate the potential for mangrove carbon revenue programs in Solomon Islands. The approach was to address three main questions: (1) How are mangrove ecosystem goods and services currently used and valued by coastal populations with a high reliance on a subsistence economy? (2) What is the total carbon stock held in mangrove ecosystems?

Linking climate change, rice yield, and migration: the Philippine experience

This study tests the hypothesis that climate change, through its rice productivity impacts, induces out-migration in the Philippines. Results show that climate change effects such as increasing night time temperature and extreme rainfall pattern, by way of reduction in rice yield and farm revenues, significantly increases the number of Overseas Filipino Workers. Findings also show that overseas migration of female workers is more sensitive to climate and rice productivity changes compared to male overseas migration.

Food security versus environment conservation: A case study of Solomon Islands' small-scale fisheries

The sustainable management of small-scale fisheries in coral reef ecosystems constitutes a difficult objective not least because these fisheries usually face several worsening pressures, including demographic growth and climate change. The implications are crucial in terms of food security as fish represents the major protein source for local populations in many regions reliant on small-scale fisheries. The case of the Solomon Islands’ fishery presented in this paper represents an illustrative example of these issues.

Fisheries and aquaculture: The importance of fish for food and nutritional security

This working paper is an attempt to distil what is known currently about the likely impacts of climate change on the commodities and natural resources that comprise the mandate of CGIAR and its 15 Centres. In this WorldFish contribution, a summary is given on the importance of fisheries and aquaculture on food nutrition and security.

Fish for the future: Fisheries development and food security for Kiribati in an era of global climate change

The Republic of Kiribati is a vast South Pacific island group with one of the largest exclusive economic zones (EEZs) in the world. Kiribati waters support a wealth of marine fisheries activities. These activities occur in oceanic, coastal and inshore environments and range from large, foreign, industrial-scale oceanic fishing operations to small-scale, domestic, inshore subsistence fisheries, aquaculture and recreational fisheries.

Exploratory analysis of resource demand and the environmental footprint of future aquaculture development using Life Cycle Assessment

Increases in fish demand in the coming decades are projected to be largely met by growth of aquaculture. However, increased aquaculture production is linked to higher demand for natural resources and energy as well as emissions to the environment. This paper explores the use of Life Cycle Assessment to improve knowledge of potential environmental impacts of future aquaculture growth. Different scenarios of future aquaculture development are taken into account in calculating the life cycle environmental impacts.

Evaluating the flow regulating functions of natural ecosystems in the Zambezi River Basin

By mitigating the vagaries of climate variability, agricultural water storage is widely anticipated to make a key contribution to climate change adaptation in Africa. However, if the planning of water storage is not improved, it is likely that many investments will fail to fully deliver intended benefits. This report describes the agricultural water storage continuum and some of the possible implications of climate change.

Economic analysis of climate change adaptation strategies in selected coastal areas in Indonesia, Philippines and Vietnam

This report is an account of a cross-country study that covered Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippines. Covering four sites (one each in Indonesia and Vietnam) and two sites in the Philippines, the study documented the impacts of three climate hazards affecting coastal communities, namely typhoon/flooding, coastal erosion and saltwater intrusion. It also analyzed planned adaptation options, which communities and local governments can implement, as well as autonomous responses of households to protect and insure themselves from these hazards.

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