Seasonal dynamics of physico-chemical characteristics and biological responses of Lake Chilwa, Southern Africa

Lake Chilwa is shared by Malawi and Mozambique, it supports an important fishery and its watershed is undergoing rapid population growth and increasing utilization for agricultural production. It is a shallow, closed basin lake with extensive surrounding wetlands; and it has suffered several desiccation events in the last century. To better understand the current condition of the lake, we monitored a suite of physical, chemical and biological parameters at approximately monthly intervals over an annual cycle in 2004–2005.

Predicting the impacts and socio-economic consequences of climate change on global marine ecosystems and fisheries: the QUEST_Fish framework

Climate change is accelerating and is already affecting the marine environment. Estimating the effects of climate change on the production of fish resources, and their dependent societies, is complex because of: difficulties of downscaling Global Climate Models (GCM) to scales of biological relevance; uncertainties over future net primary production and its transfer through the food chain; difficulties in separating the multiple stressors affecting fish production; and inadequate methodology to estimate human vulnerabilities to these changes.

Mangrove revival diversifies livelihoods while addressing climate change

Funded by the Australian Government, The project "Poverty alleviation, mangrove conservation and climate change: Carbon offsets as payments for mangrove ecosystem services in Solomon Islands" explores whether or not mangroves can be included in offset projects. This brief outlines the key elements of the projects, its key deliverables. The project offers the Government of Solomon Islands timely advice and enhanced technical expertise to cope with the costs and challenges arising from climate change.

Impacts of climate variability and change on fishery-based livelihoods

There is increasing concern over the consequences of global warming for the food security and livelihoods of the world’s 36million fisherfolk and the nearly 1.5 billion consumers who rely on fish for more than 20% of their dietary animal protein. With mounting evidence of the impacts of climate variability and change on aquatic ecosystems, the resulting impacts on fisheries livelihoods are likely to be significant, but remain a neglected area in climate adaptation policy.

Gender and aquaculture: sharing the benefits equitably

Aquaculture is the fastest growing agricultural sector in the world; it can meet both the food security and cash needs of poor households in Africa and the Asia-Pacific region. Women’s involvement in aquaculture is more significant than often assumed. In many developing countries formal statistics often overlook the nature and extent of their vital contribution. Research on gender and aquaculture at the WorldFish Center identifies five key themes for consideration.

Climate change, small-scale fisheries and smallholder aquaculture

Fisheries and aquaculture both contribute to meeting the Millennium Development Goals but vulnerability to climate change threatens the contribution that they make to development. Impacts of climate change on small-scale fisheries are of great relevance to poverty reduction. Poverty undermines the resilience of social-ecological systems such as fisheries. The majority of the world’s 250 million fisherfolk lives in areas that are highly exposed to climate change.

Climate change and other external drivers in small-scale fisheries: practical steps for responding

The effects of international trade, market globalization, technology, climatic change, health and disease, demography, governance, development patterns and aquaculture on small-scale fisheries and practical suggestions for researchers, managers and policy makers on how to develop responses to these challenges are presented.

Climate change and capture fisheries: potential impacts, adaptation and mitigation

The paper tackles the consequences of climate change impacts on fisheries and their dependent communities. It analyses the exposure, sensitivity and vulnerability of fisheries to climate change and presents examples of adaptive mechanisms currently used in the sector. The contribution of fisheries to greenhouse gas emissions is addressed and examples of mitigation strategies are given. The role of public policy and institutions in promoting climate change adaptation and mitigation is also explored.

Aquaculture helping to improve health and nutrition in Bangladesh

Bangladesh has made important human development gains in recent years, reflected by reductions in poverty, mortality of children under five, and chronic malnutrition. These gains have been achieved in spite of frequent natural disasters, volatile food/fuel prices, and the effects of climate change. However, the prevalence of underweight children in the country (41%) is still the highest in the world. Chronic poverty is evident, particularly in rural areas, where many families are unable to meet their food needs.

Aquaculture and food security in Solomon Islands

"Aquaculture and Food Security in the Solomon Islands" (ACIAR Project FIS/2009/061) was formulated to assist the Government of Solomon Islands in better understanding the future demand for aquaculture and particularly to develop a strategy to guide future development of sustainable inland aquaculture to support food security and secure livelihoods for the Solomon Islands in response to rising populations and climate change.

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