Sea level rise and tigers: predicted impacts to Bangladesh's Sundarbans mangroves: a letter

The Sundarbans mangrove ecosystem, shared by India and Bangladesh, is recognized as a global priority for biodiversity conservation. Sea level rise, due to climate change, threatens the long term persistence of the Sundarbans forests and its biodiversity. Among the forests’ biota is the only tiger (Panthera tigris) population in the world adapted for life in mangrove forests. Prior predictions on the impacts of sea level rise on the Sundarbans have been hampered by coarse elevation data in this low-lying region, where every centimeter counts.

Mountain GIS: promoting geographic information and earth observation applications for the sustainable development of the Hindu Kush-Himalayan region

The Hindu Kush-Himalayan (HKH) region, home to the largest concentration of glaciers outside of the polar region, is the ‘water-tower’ of Asia. The HKH mountain ecosystem provides life support services to almost a third of humanity. Many mountain issues such as management of water resources, climate change, biodiversity conservation and hazard mitigation are interconnected in nature and, therefore, need to be considered holistically.

Mangrove revival diversifies livelihoods while addressing climate change

Funded by the Australian Government, The project "Poverty alleviation, mangrove conservation and climate change: Carbon offsets as payments for mangrove ecosystem services in Solomon Islands" explores whether or not mangroves can be included in offset projects. This brief outlines the key elements of the projects, its key deliverables. The project offers the Government of Solomon Islands timely advice and enhanced technical expertise to cope with the costs and challenges arising from climate change.

The impacts of El Nino on Philippine fisheries.

The El Nino phenomenon is an "anomalous climatic condition in the tropical Pacific region which occurs every two to seven years and affects the global climate". There is a greater increase in the water surface temperature of the eastern tropical and central tropical Pacific during an El Nino episode relative to that of the western tropical Pacific. The phenomenon causes fluctuations in rainfall, resulting in drought in some areas and heavy rainfall in others.

Gender and fisheries: do women support, complement or subsidize men's small-scale fishing activities?

Women’s involvement in fisheries is more significant than often assumed. According to current estimates from nine major fish producing countries, they comprise 46% of the labor force in smallscale capture fisheries-related activities, including pre- and post-harvesting work. Their current engagement is shaped by rapidly dwindling fisheries stocks on one hand, and the increased global demand for fish on the other. At the WorldFish Center, research on gender and fisheries currently focuses on: 1. Markets, trade and migration 2. Capabilities and well-being 3. Identities and networks 4.

The future is now: how scenarios can help Senegalese and Mauritanian fisheries adapt to climate change

Localized changes in the productivity of marine and inland waters induced by climate change will pose new challenges to the fishery and the aquaculture sectors in West Africa. However, climate change does not occur in isolation of other drivers of change: processes of environmental, economic and social change can affect the fishery sector, potentially creating additional vulnerability to climate change. Scenarios are a useful tool to explore uncertainties and understand non-climatic drivers of change.

Fuelling the decline in UK fishing communities?

Volatile fuel prices are a threat to the viability of UK fishing communities. The economic and social impacts of rising fuel costs for fishers and communities in southwest England are examined. Fuel prices doubled between early 2007 and mid-2008, whereas fish prices remained relatively stable throughout as a result of the price-setting power of seafood buyers. It was the fishers who absorbed the increased costs, resulting in significant loss of income, reduced job security, and problems in recruiting crew.

Fisheries management and governance challenges in a climate change

This chapter outlines the causes and consequences of climate change and summarise future projections for ocean temperature rise, coral bleaching events and ocean acidification, and the associated uncertainties. This review largely focuses on marine ecosystems, as three quarters of capture fisheries landings come from the seas. However, it also presents key issues and examples from freshwater fisheries, as these fisheries provide important livelihoods and fish protein for some of the world’s poorest people.

Fish supply and demand scenarios in Cambodia and perspectives on the future role of aquaculture

Fish is vital to the well-being and livelihoods to millions of people in the Lower Mekong Basin, many of whom are poor, relying on fish as a major source of animal protein, sometimes the only source. The supply of ‘free’ wild fish is under threat from overfishing, climate change, habitat modification and hydro power development which could mean less fish supplied from natural sources yet at the same time more demand. Aquaculture - farming of fish and other aquatic animals - is becoming increasingly more important in supplying fish to people in the region.

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