Should enhanced resilience be an objective of natural resource management research for developing countries

Productivity enhancement has traditionally been the main focus of agricultural research to alleviate poverty and enhance food security of poor farmers in the developing world. Recently, the harmful impact of climate change, economic volatility, and other external shocks on poor farmers has led to concern that resilience should feature alongside productivity as a major objective of research.

Rethinking agriculture in the Greater Mekong subregion: how to sustainably meet food needs, enhance ecosystem services and cope with climate change

Nations of the Greater Mekong Subregion need to ‘rethink’ their agricultural industries to meet future food needs, given the social shifts and climate changes that are forecast for the coming decades. With better farming practices, and by managing agriculture within the wider context of natural ecosystems, nations could boost production and increase the wealth and resilience of poor people in rural communities. Demand for food is forecast to double by 2050, as populations swell and people’s dietary choices change.

The natural history and fisheries ecology of Lake Chilwa, southern Malawi

Lake Chilwa produces between zero and 24,000 metric tons of fish per year, making it one of the most productive but variable lakes in Africa. The size of the lake varies seasonally and among years, sometimes drying completely. Its surrounding wetland and floodplain provide habitat for a diversity of birds and economically valuable grasses and reeds. When the lake has water, there is considerable activity on its shores and temporary fishing villages spring up. People move in and out of the lake basin in concert with these seasonal and longer term changes.

Mountain GIS: promoting geographic information and earth observation applications for the sustainable development of the Hindu Kush-Himalayan region

The Hindu Kush-Himalayan (HKH) region, home to the largest concentration of glaciers outside of the polar region, is the ‘water-tower’ of Asia. The HKH mountain ecosystem provides life support services to almost a third of humanity. Many mountain issues such as management of water resources, climate change, biodiversity conservation and hazard mitigation are interconnected in nature and, therefore, need to be considered holistically.

Mangrove revival diversifies livelihoods while addressing climate change

Funded by the Australian Government, The project "Poverty alleviation, mangrove conservation and climate change: Carbon offsets as payments for mangrove ecosystem services in Solomon Islands" explores whether or not mangroves can be included in offset projects. This brief outlines the key elements of the projects, its key deliverables. The project offers the Government of Solomon Islands timely advice and enhanced technical expertise to cope with the costs and challenges arising from climate change.

The impacts of El Nino on Philippine fisheries.

The El Nino phenomenon is an "anomalous climatic condition in the tropical Pacific region which occurs every two to seven years and affects the global climate". There is a greater increase in the water surface temperature of the eastern tropical and central tropical Pacific during an El Nino episode relative to that of the western tropical Pacific. The phenomenon causes fluctuations in rainfall, resulting in drought in some areas and heavy rainfall in others.

Gleaner, fisher, trader, processor: understanding gendered employment in fisheries and aquaculture

Most research on gender difference or inequities in capture fisheries and aquaculture in Africa and the Asia-Pacific focuses on the gender division of labour. Emerging research on globalization, market changes, poverty and trends in gendered employment within this sector reveals the need to move beyond this narrow perspective. If gleaning and post-harvesting activities were enumerated, the fisheries and aquaculture sector might well turn out to be female sphere.

Gender and aquaculture: sharing the benefits equitably

Aquaculture is the fastest growing agricultural sector in the world; it can meet both the food security and cash needs of poor households in Africa and the Asia-Pacific region. Women’s involvement in aquaculture is more significant than often assumed. In many developing countries formal statistics often overlook the nature and extent of their vital contribution. Research on gender and aquaculture at the WorldFish Center identifies five key themes for consideration.

Fisheries production systems, climate change and climate variability in West Africa: an annotated bibliography

This bibliography is intended for people who are involved in fisheries, aquaculture, climate change, disaster management and policy development in West Africa or interested in one or more of these issues. The literature in this bibliography includes peer-reviewed journals, books and book chapters, grey reports and institutional technical papers, but is restricted to literature in English. Each citation also includes an abstract.

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