Linking climate change, rice yield, and migration: the Philippine experience

This study tests the hypothesis that climate change, through its rice productivity impacts, induces out-migration in the Philippines. Results show that climate change effects such as increasing night time temperature and extreme rainfall pattern, by way of reduction in rice yield and farm revenues, significantly increases the number of Overseas Filipino Workers. Findings also show that overseas migration of female workers is more sensitive to climate and rice productivity changes compared to male overseas migration.

Impacts of climate change and variability on fish value chains in Uganda

Fish are a significant source of income and food security in Uganda, highly vulnerable to climate and non-climate related drivers of change. This study examines the vulnerability of the fish sector in Uganda as it relates to the predicted impacts from climate change and variability, using the concept of the value chain. The specific purpose of the study was to identify current and potential impact pathways of climate change and corresponding adaptation strategies in fish value chains.

The impact of climate change: adapting to climate change; Experiences of a community in Northeast Cambodia

This DVD contains the results of two community produced media projects created by village communities in Stung Treng Province in North-eastern Cambodia. The first entititled Impact of Climate Change and the second entitled Adapting to climate change: experiences of a community in Northeast Cambodia. It is a part of community based adaptation project and ongoing social research initiative supported by CEPA and the WorldFish Center, financial supports provided by SIDA through the Wetland Alliance & Swedish Environmental Secretariat for Asia (SENSA) and Small Grant Program (SGP/UNDP)

Food security and the coral Triangle Initiative

The Asia-Pacific's Coral Triangle is defined by its extremely high marine biodiversity. Over one hundred million people living in its coastal zones use this biodiversity to support their livelihoods. Hundreds of millions more derive nutritious food directly from the region's marine resources and through local, regional and global trade. Biodiversity and its values to society are threatened by demographic and habitat change, rising demand, intensive harvesting and climate change.

Evaluating the flow regulating functions of natural ecosystems in the Zambezi River Basin

By mitigating the vagaries of climate variability, agricultural water storage is widely anticipated to make a key contribution to climate change adaptation in Africa. However, if the planning of water storage is not improved, it is likely that many investments will fail to fully deliver intended benefits. This report describes the agricultural water storage continuum and some of the possible implications of climate change.

Economic analysis of climate change adaptation strategies in selected coastal areas in Indonesia, Philippines and Vietnam

This report is an account of a cross-country study that covered Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippines. Covering four sites (one each in Indonesia and Vietnam) and two sites in the Philippines, the study documented the impacts of three climate hazards affecting coastal communities, namely typhoon/flooding, coastal erosion and saltwater intrusion. It also analyzed planned adaptation options, which communities and local governments can implement, as well as autonomous responses of households to protect and insure themselves from these hazards.

Can marine fisheries and aquaculture meet fish demand from a growing human population in a changing climate?

Expansion in the world's human population and economic development will increase future demand for fish products. As global fisheries yield is constrained by ecosystems productivity and management effectiveness, per capita fish consumption can only be maintained or increased if aquaculture makes an increasing contribution to the volume and stability of global fish supplies.

Autonomous adaptation to climate change by shrimp and catfish farmers in Vietnam’s Mekong River delta

The Mekong River delta of Vietnam supports a thriving aquaculture industry but is exposed to the impacts of climate change. In particular, sea level rise and attendant increased flooding (both coastal and riverine) and coastal salinity intrusion threaten the long-term viability of this important industry. This working paper summarizes an analysis of the economics of aquaculture adaptation in the delta, focusing on the grow-out of two exported aquaculture species—the freshwater striped catfish and the brackish-water tiger shrimp.

Asset or liability? Aquaculture in a natural disaster prone area

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the role of aquaculture in improving a family's ability to cope with disasters like cyclones. Small-scale aquaculture is expanding in deltas globally. This work, therefore, seeks to better understand the role of such household assets in one particularly vulnerable region; coastal Bangladesh. Benefits and the potential contribution of aquaculture towards surviving after a catastrophe are explored.

Assessment of capabilities, needs of communities, opportunities and limitations of weather forecasting for coastal regions of Bangladesh

This report is intended to provide a range of background material in relation to Bangladesh and weather event forecasting, forecast information dissemination, and the implications of weather events and forecasting for communities and their livelihoods. It identifies where institutional efforts and funds have been, and are presently being focused, and ultimately makes some recommendations about CCAFS and WorldFish potential involvement/investment in these areas.


Subscribe to RSS - Climate change