Marine fisheries along the southwest coast of India

Marine fisheries production in India has increased from 0.5 million t in 1950 to 2.47 million t in 1997. The gross value of fisheries landings in India was US$2.37 billion in 1997. The contribution of fisheries to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has risen from 0.7% in 1980 - 81 to 1.2% in 1994 - 95. The contribution to agricultural GDP has risen from 1.9% to 4%. Fisheries production also plays a critical role in food security and livelihood in rural areas.

A preliminary assessment of the coastal fishery resources in India: socioeconomic and bioeconomic perspective

India is endowed with a continental shelf of 0.5 million km2 and an exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of about 2 million km2. Almost half (39%) of the Indian population utilizes the marine fisheries resources. India ranked sixth worldwide in total fish production (4.95 million t) and second in inland fish production (2.24 million t) during 1995 - 96. Fish production expanded from 0.75 million t in 1950 - 51 to 4.95 million t in 1995 - 96, giving a significant increase at a cumulative growth rate of 4.2% per annum.

Customary law and the evolution of coastal zone management

Although fisheries production in the Indo-Pacific has markedly increased, employment opportunities have diminished, social inequalities have been exacerbated and peasant fishing households have been further impoverished. Thevarious reasons as to why this has occurred are considered. It is thought that an equitable system of coastal zone management should pay particular attention to the needs of traditional coastal communities, especially as such communities are often underdeveloped sectors of nations which are severely disadvantaged in international terms.

Co-managing shared waters: a coastal governance experience of Western Visayas Region, Philippines

Coastal ecosystems in the Philippines are under stress from the combined effects of human overexploitation and habitat destruction. In recent years, the concept of an integrated approach to coastal resource management has been adopted to address this. This new paradigm, generally described as co-management, makes use of the participation of the different sectors (e.g. government, community) in the management process. CRMCs are multi-sectoral in nature with inter-LGU partnerships and different resource-sharing schemes.

Nearshore fish aggregating devices: a means of habitat protection and food security in post disaster Solomon Islands

In the aftermath of the tsunami in 2007, in an effort to assist communities in Western Province in Solomon Islands, the World Wide Fund for Nature, Solomon Islands (WWFSI) received funding from the David and Lucille Packard Foundation for a project on “Post-disaster fisheries and marine conservation recovery activities in the Western Province, Solomon Islands”.

Enhancing the resilience of coral reef resources

The issues relating to the management of the coastal zone are multi-faceted and some issues are largely intertwined with policy and development goals in larger administrative units. The natural boundaries of reef resources, the processes that support reef ecosystems, and the local or national affili ation of the people who benefit from them may transcend the boundaries of the local management units. Thus, efforts to arrest the decline in fish catch from and loss of biodiversi ty in reefs require that management interventions and assess-ment activities are carried out at varying scales.

Community management of coastal resources, southern Thailand

The involvement of communities with the assistance and support of government and non government organizations on the management of the coastal resources in Southern Thailand are discussed. The 3 most important resources, mangrove, seagrass and coral, create a complex coastal ecology. Several man-made activities causing the deterioration of this resources are also presented.

Community-based coastal resource management in Orion (Bataan, Philippines) : building community property rights in a fishing community.

The Community-based Coastal Resource Management Project in Orion, Bataan, Philippines was started in 1991. The village level fishers organizations have formed a municipal-wide association called the Samahan at Ugnayan ng Pangisdaan sa Orion (SUGPO). It represents 70% of the small-scale fishers in Orion and has taken on the task of rehabilitating the degraded fishing grounds.

Regional efforts in the management of the coastal and marine environments in the ASEAN region

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) which comprises Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand has a combined coastline of 85,504 km and a total sea area of approximately 8 multiplied by 1 million km super(2) (including EEZ). Recognizing the important contributions of the natural systems and the needs to maintain sustainable growth of the economy, ASEAN has over the past several years undertaken collective regional efforts to improve its capacity and capability in the management of the coastal and marine environments.

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