Mangrove rehabilitation and coastal resource management: a case study of Cogtong Bay, Philippines.

The Cogtong Bay experience represents a bold attempt to pursue a shared responsibility between the government and local residents for rehabilitating coastal resources. Some of the factors that provided the impetus to co-management arrangements were the recognition of resource management problems, dependence on coastal resources for livelihood and the desire for more sustainable resource use.

Community livelihood and patterns of natural resources uses in the shrimp-farm impacted Mekong Delta

This case study looks at changing livelihood strategies of the coastal population in Soc Trang Province in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam, and their impacts on natural resources. It provides an opportunity not only to document the impact of shrimp farming on coastal livelihood but also to better understand the link between brackish water aquaculture development and natural resource use. The approach includes a socio-economic survey in six villages of the province focusing on risk strategies and livelihood diversification.

Community-based coastal resource management in Orion (Bataan, Philippines) : building community property rights in a fishing community.

The Community-based Coastal Resource Management Project in Orion, Bataan, Philippines was started in 1991. The village level fishers organizations have formed a municipal-wide association called the Samahan at Ugnayan ng Pangisdaan sa Orion (SUGPO). It represents 70% of the small-scale fishers in Orion and has taken on the task of rehabilitating the degraded fishing grounds.

The Ahupua'a concept: relearning coastal resource management from ancient Hawaiians

Isolated in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, Hawaii was one of the last areas to be reached by "western" explorers; as a consequence, some ancient traditions were preserved in Hawaii well into the 19th and 20th centuries, providing an opportunity to learn from a surviving indigenous culture. An account is given of the division of the islands into various units and their exploitation. The smallest major divisions were the "ahupua'as," which spread out at the base along the shore and were self-sufficient units.

Strategic review of enhancements and culture-based fisheries.

Enhancements are interventions in the life cycle of common-pool aquatic resources. Enhancement technologies include culture-based fisheries, habitat modifications, fertilization, feeding and elimination of predators/competitors.Enhancements are estimated to yield about two million mt per year, mostly from culture-based fisheries in fresh waters where they account for some 20 percent of capture, or 10 percent of combined capture and culture production.

A new approach for analyzing and comparing coastal resource systems.

ICLARM has recently developed a strategic Plan for International research on living aquatic resources management which identifies tropical coastal resource systems as one of its areas of research emphasis. Details are given of a new approach for analysing and comparing coastal resource systems - the coastal cross-section concept. Agroecosystems analysis and farming systems research were used as a basis for the development of this concept.

A low-level geographic information system for coastal zone management with applications to Brunei Darussalam: Part III:: simulation and tracking oil spills.

B:RUN is a low-level GIS software designed to help formulate options for the management of the coastal zone of Brunei Darussalam. This contribution presents the oil spill simulation module of B:RUN. This simple module, based largely on wind and sea surface current vector parameters, may be helpful in formulating relevant oil spill contingency plans. It can be easily adapted to other areas, as can the B:RUN software itself.

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