Status and management of the Java sea fisheries

The Java Sea is a major fishing ground in Indonesia contributing 31% of the national marine fisheries production. Demersal and small pelagic fishery resources account for most production in the area. During the 1960s and 1970s, strong demand for fish, which in Indonesia resulted from both increased human population and increased per capita fish consumption, stimulated the development of fishing in the Java Sea. This led to development of up-stream and down-stream industries, increases in employment opportunities, and increases in the number of fishers and fishing households.

Fishing dynamics associated with periodically harvested marine closures

Periodically-harvested fisheries closures are emerging as a socially acceptable and locally implementable way to balance concerns about conserving ecosystem function and sustaining livelihoods. Across the Indo-Pacific periodically-harvested closures are commonly employed, yet their contribution towards more sustainable fisheries remains largely untested in the social and ecological context of tropical small-scale fisheries.

Do non-users value coral reefs?: Economic valuation of conserving Tubbataha Reefs, Philippines

The main purpose of the study is to determine whether non-use values exist among residents of Quezon City, hundreds of kilometers away from Tubbataha Reefs. The dichotomous choice contingent valuation method (CVM) was employed across 800 randomly selected respondents, 400 of which were personally interviewed (PI) and 400 were asked to accomplish self-administered (SA) questionnaires, 198 of the latter were found useable for the study.

The Coral Triangle Atlas: An integrated online spatial database system for improving coral reef management

In this paper we describe the construction of an online GIS database system, hosted by WorldFish, which stores bio-physical, ecological and socio-economic data for the ‘Coral Triangle Area’ in South-east Asia and the Pacific. The database has been built in partnership with all six (Timor-Leste, Malaysia, Indonesia, The Philippines, Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea) of the Coral Triangle countries, and represents a valuable source of information for natural resource managers at the regional scale.

Community-based marine resource management in Solomon Islands: A facilitators guide. Based on lessons from implementing CBRM with rural coastal communities in Solomon Islands (2005-2013)

This guide was developed to document the process and activities that WorldFish staff have used and adapted as facilitators working with communities interested in marine resource management in Solomon Islands. It draws on the experiences from work conducted with FSPI and MFMR through ACIAR funded projects, with communities that had a primary interest in the management of coral reef fisheries. Since 2011 the process has been trialed and adapted further with communities interested in mangrove ecosystem management (through the MESCAL project).

Spatial Data Quality Control for the Coral Triangle Atlas

The Coral Triangle is a global priority for conservation and since the creation of the Coral Triangle Initiative in 2007 it has been a major focus for a multi-lateral conservation partnership uniting the region's six governments. The Coral Triangle (CT) Atlas was developed to provide scientists and managers with the best available data on marine resources in the Coral Triangle.

An artificial reef for artisanal fisheries enhancement in Costa Rica.

A literature review indicated that artificial reefs seemed promising as refuges for fauna and to increase fish productivity. The author studied this alternative and after several months of preparatory arrangements a small reef was built between June and April 1984 at a depth of 10 m using approximately 400 scrap tires on the eastern shore of the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica.

Valuation of coral reef systems: case study of Philippine coral reefs (Taklong Island national marine reserve)

This report is an outcome of a collaborative effort between ICLARM and the University of Philippines - Visayas with funding support from Sida under the project "Valuation and policy analysis for sustainable management of coral reefs". The report summarizes various outputs provided by Taklong Island National Marine Reserve( TINMAR) that directly benefit the coastal communities and other resource users. The biological studies reviewed in the report also indicated that fish biomass has increased which can be attributed to the protection of the area as a marine reserve.

Growth and mortality of Ctenochaetus striatus, Stegastes nigricans and Sargocentron microstoma in Tiahura Reef, Moorea Island, French Polynesia.

Growth parameters and mortality rates were estimated from length-frequency data sampled in 1982, using the FiSAT software, for three coral reef fish species, the surgeon fish (Ctenochaetus striatus), the damselfish (Stegastes nigricans) and the squirrel fish (Sargocentron microstoma) in Tiahura Reef, Moorea Island, French Polynesia.

Global human footprint on the linkage between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in reef fishes

Difficulties in scaling up theoretical and experimental results have raised controversy over the consequences of biodiversity loss for the functioning of natural ecosystems. Using a global survey of reef fish assemblages, we show that in contrast to previous theoretical and experimental studies, ecosystem functioning (as measured by standing biomass) scales in a non-saturating manner with biodiversity (as measured by species and functional richness) in this ecosystem.

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