Planning the use of fish for food security in Solomon Islands

This study was funded through the USAID-supported Coral Triangle Support Partnership (CTSP). As part of the US CTI Support Program, CTSP is part of the United States Government’s commitment to promote the sustainable management of the marine and coastal resources in the Coral Triangle. In cooperation with the Coral Triangle national governments and the international community, CTSP is a five-year program that provides technical assistance and helps build capacity to address critical issues including food security, climate change, and marine biological diversity.

Optimising the use of nearshore fish aggregating devices for food security in the Pacific Islands

It is widely recognised that anchored, nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) are one of the few practical ‘vehicles’ for increasing access to tuna to help feed the rapidly growing rural and urban populations in many Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs). However, considerable planning, monitoring and research is still needed to understand and fulfil the potential of nearshore FADs.

Food security and the coral Triangle Initiative

The Asia-Pacific's Coral Triangle is defined by its extremely high marine biodiversity. Over one hundred million people living in its coastal zones use this biodiversity to support their livelihoods. Hundreds of millions more derive nutritious food directly from the region's marine resources and through local, regional and global trade. Biodiversity and its values to society are threatened by demographic and habitat change, rising demand, intensive harvesting and climate change.

Crisis sentinel indicators: Averting a potential meltdown in the Coral Triangle

The Coral Triangle (CT) includes some or all of the land and seas of six countries: Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, the Solomon Islands, and Timor-Leste (CT6). It covers only 1.1% of the world's area, but is the global hotspot for marine biodiversity and a rich spawning area for tuna. One-third of the CT6 population and millions more from outside the region are dependent on these resources. However, a range of human pressures threaten the biological health and diversity in the CT, affecting the food security and livelihoods of these people.

Coral reef economic value and incentives for coral farming in Solomon Islands

This brief was completed as part of the Coral Triangle Initiative on Coral Reefs, Fisheries and Food Security (CTI-CFF) National Program in the Solomon Islands. The research project, "Economic valuation of coral reefs and development of sustainable financing options in the Solomon Islands" was designed to assess the economic value of coral reefs using the aquarium and curio coral trades as an entry point.

ReefBase 2.0: a contribution to environmental conservation on a global scale.

The 1997 International Year of the Reef sees the release of ReefBase 2.0: a global database on coral reefs and their resources. It provides the most comprehensive and accessible repository of information to date. Containing information on over 7000 coral reefs in more than 123 countries, ReefBase 2.0 offers an extensive range of time-related data pertaining to coastal tourism, benthic environment ecology, fish population statistics, oceanography, socioeconomics, mariculture, and harvest activities. It also outlines the stresses causing reef degradation as well as management initiatives.

Ocean sciences in relation to living resources

A major new international research program of importance to fisheries is likely to be adopted later this year. Ocean Sciences in Relation to Living Resources, sponsored by FAO and IOC, a proposal concerning the relationship between ocean variability and fish variability has been developed by a special group, as well as suggestions for incremental development of a broader program on the relationship of ocean science and living resources.

Length-weight relationship of fishes from coral reefs and lagoons of New Caledonia: an update.

Length-weight relationships of 316 reef and lagoon fish from New Caledonia (SW Pacific Ocean) belonging to 68 families are computed. A total of 43,750 individuals was used for this purpose. Fish were sampled by different techniques such as rotenone poisoning, handline and bottom longline fishing, gill and trammel nets, and trawling in various isotopes (coral reefs, lagoon bottoms and mangroves).

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