Phylogeography of a pearl oyster (Pinctada maxima) across the Indo-Australian Archipelago: evidence of strong regional structure and population expansions but no phylogenetic breaks

This study investigates the genetic structure and phylogeography of a broadcast spawning bivalve mollusc, Pinctada maxima, throughout the Indo-West Pacific and northern Australia. DNA sequence variation of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene was analysed in 367 individuals sampled from nine populations across the Indo-West Pacific.

A framework to assess national level vulnerability from the perspective of food security: The case of coral reef fisheries

Measuring the vulnerability of human populations to environmental change is increasingly being used to develop appropriate adaptation policies and management plans for different economic sectors. We developed a national-level vulnerability index that is specific to food security policies by measuring nations’ relative vulnerabilities to a decline in their coral reef fisheries. Coral reef fisheries are expected to decline with climate and anthropogenic disturbances, which may have significant consequences for food security.

Food security and the coral Triangle Initiative

The Asia-Pacific's Coral Triangle is defined by its extremely high marine biodiversity. Over one hundred million people living in its coastal zones use this biodiversity to support their livelihoods. Hundreds of millions more derive nutritious food directly from the region's marine resources and through local, regional and global trade. Biodiversity and its values to society are threatened by demographic and habitat change, rising demand, intensive harvesting and climate change.

Do non-users value coral reefs?: Economic valuation of conserving Tubbataha Reefs, Philippines

The main purpose of the study is to determine whether non-use values exist among residents of Quezon City, hundreds of kilometers away from Tubbataha Reefs. The dichotomous choice contingent valuation method (CVM) was employed across 800 randomly selected respondents, 400 of which were personally interviewed (PI) and 400 were asked to accomplish self-administered (SA) questionnaires, 198 of the latter were found useable for the study.

The Coral Triangle Atlas: An integrated online spatial database system for improving coral reef management

In this paper we describe the construction of an online GIS database system, hosted by WorldFish, which stores bio-physical, ecological and socio-economic data for the ‘Coral Triangle Area’ in South-east Asia and the Pacific. The database has been built in partnership with all six (Timor-Leste, Malaysia, Indonesia, The Philippines, Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea) of the Coral Triangle countries, and represents a valuable source of information for natural resource managers at the regional scale.

Coral reef economic value and incentives for coral farming in Solomon Islands

This brief was completed as part of the Coral Triangle Initiative on Coral Reefs, Fisheries and Food Security (CTI-CFF) National Program in the Solomon Islands. The research project, "Economic valuation of coral reefs and development of sustainable financing options in the Solomon Islands" was designed to assess the economic value of coral reefs using the aquarium and curio coral trades as an entry point.

Community-based marine resource management in Solomon Islands: A facilitators guide. Based on lessons from implementing CBRM with rural coastal communities in Solomon Islands (2005-2013)

This guide was developed to document the process and activities that WorldFish staff have used and adapted as facilitators working with communities interested in marine resource management in Solomon Islands. It draws on the experiences from work conducted with FSPI and MFMR through ACIAR funded projects, with communities that had a primary interest in the management of coral reef fisheries. Since 2011 the process has been trialed and adapted further with communities interested in mangrove ecosystem management (through the MESCAL project).

Catch rates, composition and fish size from reefs managed with periodically-harvested closures

Periodically-harvested closures are commonly employed within co-management frameworks to help manage small-scale, multi-species fisheries in the Indo-Pacific. Despite their widespread use, the benefits of periodic harvesting strategies for multi-species fisheries have, to date, been largely untested. We examine catch and effort data from four periodically-harvested reef areas and 55 continuously-fished reefs in Solomon Islands.

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