Rethinking environmental leadership: The social construction of leaders and leadership in discourses of ecological crisis, development, and conservation

Leadership is heralded as being critical to addressing the “crisis of governance” facing the Earth's natural systems. While political, economic, and corporate discourses of leadership have been widely and critically interrogated, narratives of environmental leadership remain relatively neglected in the academic literature. The aims of this paper are twofold. First, to highlight the centrality and importance of environmental science's construction and mobilization of leadership discourse.

Improving productivity and environmental performance of aquaculture

Fish—including finfish and shellfish—are an important item in the human food basket, contributing 17 percent of the global animal-based protein supply in 2010. They are an especially valuable food source in developing countries, where more than 75 percent of the world’s fish consumption occurs. In addition to protein, fish contain micronutrients and longchain omega-3 fatty acids that are essential for maternal and child health, but often deficient in the diets of the poor.

Fishing for justice: Human rights, development, and fisheries sector reform

A review of case law and other documentation of human rights issues in fishing communities highlights forced evictions, detention without trial, child labour, forced labour and unsafe working conditions, and violence and personal security, including gender-based violence, as key areas of concern. We argue that human rights violations undermine current attempts to reform the fisheries sector in developing countries by increasing the vulnerability and marginalization of certain groups.

Fisheries development programs and women

A brief examination is made of development programmes aimed at improving the status of women in fisheries, with particular reference to the Bay of Bengal Programme. Activities of this programme have included instruction on small business management, net-making, aquaculture, fish processing and marketing; some of these activities focus specifically on women and benefits have included the establishment of day-care centres and schools which offer equal opportunity to girls and women.

Fisheries development in the Kingdom of Tonga

A summary is given of efforts made by local and foreign organizations to improve artisanal fisheries in Tonga throughthe introduction of improved fishing vessels and associated training programs. The demonstration boat program, which involved the introduction of semienclosed diesel-powered fishing vessels, are described. The engines proved to be simple and economical to operate and maintain, and the vessels were more seaworthy than the traditional boats and provided more comfort and safety in poor sea conditions.

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