Micro-enterprise development in selected fishing communities in the province of Iloilo, Philippines

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations provided funding in support of the development of micro-enterprises in Banate Bay, Iloilo and Southern Iloilo. This project was implemented by the University of the Philippines in the Visayas in coordination with the Banate Bay Resource Management Council, Inc. and the Southern Iloilo Coastal Resource Management Council.

Improving productivity and environmental performance of aquaculture

Fish—including finfish and shellfish—are an important item in the human food basket, contributing 17 percent of the global animal-based protein supply in 2010. They are an especially valuable food source in developing countries, where more than 75 percent of the world’s fish consumption occurs. In addition to protein, fish contain micronutrients and longchain omega-3 fatty acids that are essential for maternal and child health, but often deficient in the diets of the poor.

Fisheries development programs and women

A brief examination is made of development programmes aimed at improving the status of women in fisheries, with particular reference to the Bay of Bengal Programme. Activities of this programme have included instruction on small business management, net-making, aquaculture, fish processing and marketing; some of these activities focus specifically on women and benefits have included the establishment of day-care centres and schools which offer equal opportunity to girls and women.

Fisheries development in the Kingdom of Tonga

A summary is given of efforts made by local and foreign organizations to improve artisanal fisheries in Tonga throughthe introduction of improved fishing vessels and associated training programs. The demonstration boat program, which involved the introduction of semienclosed diesel-powered fishing vessels, are described. The engines proved to be simple and economical to operate and maintain, and the vessels were more seaworthy than the traditional boats and provided more comfort and safety in poor sea conditions.

Exploratory analysis of resource demand and the environmental footprint of future aquaculture development using Life Cycle Assessment

Increases in fish demand in the coming decades are projected to be largely met by growth of aquaculture. However, increased aquaculture production is linked to higher demand for natural resources and energy as well as emissions to the environment. This paper explores the use of Life Cycle Assessment to improve knowledge of potential environmental impacts of future aquaculture growth. Different scenarios of future aquaculture development are taken into account in calculating the life cycle environmental impacts.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Development