Wetlands

After commencing with a summary of the current status, importance and productivity of natural wetlands, the chapter reviews the contribution of wetland ecological functions to sustaining vital ecosystem services. Wetlands are vulnerable to a range of anthropogenic pressures, notably land use change, disruption to regional hydrological regimes as a result of abstraction and impoundment, pollution and excessive nutrient loading, the introduction of invasive species and overexploitation of biomass, plants and animals.

Sustainable production of small fish in wetland areas of Bangladesh

Bangladesh is rich in aquatic resources with extensive seasonal and perennial water bodies throughout the country. In the past, the expansive floodplains, oxbow lakes, beels, and haors were home to a vast range of fish species. Of the 260 fishes found in the inland waters of Bangladesh, 150 grow to a small size (maximum length of about 25 cm), and these are found in the wetlands.

Nourishing Bangladesh with micronutrient-rich small fish

Increasing the quantity and frequency of small fish consumption can boost nutrition, health and well-being of the people of Bangladesh. Small fish are rich in micronutrients, particularly vitamin A, iron, zinc and calcium, as well as animal protein and essential fats. Small fish are highly nutritious as they are usually consumed whole. Pregnant and lactating women and young children from the age of 6 months to two years should consume small fish as they promote healthy growth and development in children and can lead to better performance at school, and at work later in life.

New species in the old world: Europe as a frontier in biodiversity exploration, a test bed for 21st century taxonomy

The number of described species on the planet is about 1.9 million, with ca. 17,000 new species described annually, mostly from the tropics. However, taxonomy is usually described as a science in crisis, lacking manpower and funding, a politically acknowledged problem known as the Taxonomic Impediment. Using data from the Fauna Europaea database and the Zoological Record, we show that contrary to general belief, developed and heavily-studied parts of the world are important reservoirs of unknown species.

Introduction to fish species diversity: Sunamganj haor region with CBRMP's working area

This book is a modest attempt at identifying Sunamganj haor fish species, especially in areas falling under the Sunamganj Community Based Resource Management Project (CBRMP). It contains a total of 126 fish species from 39 families found in the Sunamganj haor area. CBRMP has promoted community based fisheries management approaches that, along with their livelihoods focus, are helping to preserve and enhance natural fish stocks in the hoar basin. WorldFish support to LGED involves a number of areas including monitoring the impacts of CBRMP on fish catch, bio-diversity and livelihoods.

Fish biodiversity research in the Mekong Basin

The Mekong River is one of the great rivers of the world and is characterized by high fish biodiversity. A number of organizations are working at observing and protecting aquatic biodiversity in this hotspot of global importance. Among them are international organizations such as the WWF, Wetlands International, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and the United Nation Environment Program (UNEP) but also regional institutions and national line agencies or nongovernmental organizations (NGOs).

Carrying capacities and site selection within the ecosystem approach to aquaculture

The growth in world aquaculture required to meet the demands of society will result in ever-increasing pressure upon aquatic and terrestrial resources. There are also potential consequences on the environment and on biodiversity, as well as inevitable societal impacts. There is growing adoption of aspects of the ecosystem approach to aquaculture (EAA), which takes a holistic view of the developments in the sector in an attempt to enable sustainable growth while avoiding negative effects.

Biology and culture of cockles (Anadarinids)

Anadarinids are marine bivalve molluscs harvested commercially and on a subsistence basis in many warm temperate to tropical countries. They are frequently called mangrove cockles, blood cockles or simply cockles, although true cockles belong to a different bivalve family. In Asia the anadarinid cockles are known locally as kerang (Malay), hoy kreng (Thai) and si-ham (Cantonese). This article gives a brief account of the culture and biology of cockles in the Asian region.

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