Wetlands

After commencing with a summary of the current status, importance and productivity of natural wetlands, the chapter reviews the contribution of wetland ecological functions to sustaining vital ecosystem services. Wetlands are vulnerable to a range of anthropogenic pressures, notably land use change, disruption to regional hydrological regimes as a result of abstraction and impoundment, pollution and excessive nutrient loading, the introduction of invasive species and overexploitation of biomass, plants and animals.

Trophic model of the coastal fisheries ecosystem in the Gulf of Thailand

The biomass of 40 ecological groups, the diet composition of prey and predators, production/biomass (P/B) and consumption/biomass (Q/B) ratios, and catches were used as basic input to parameterize an Ecopath model of the Gulf of Thailand. Following construction of a mass-balance ecosystem model, a time-dynamic simulation model (Ecosim) was used to simulate the impact of change in fishing effort. This was done using time series data to validate the historic fisheries development in the Gulf of Thailand prior to using the model for forward-looking simulations.

Mangrove management in Solomon Islands: Case studies from Malaita Province

Mangroves are an important resource for the rural coastal people of Solomon Islands. Mangrove forests are critical for food security and the livelihoods of coastal communities in Solomon Islands. In particular, mangroves are an important source of food (e.g. fish, mangrove fruit, shells and crabs) and timber (e.g. for firewood and building materials).

A holistic, ecosystem approach to investigating tropical multispecies reservoir fisheries

An account is given of the methodology and findings of a holistic, ecosystemic investigation of the multispecies fisheries of Bukit Merah Reservoir in Malaysia in 1978-80. The need for sound biological and ecological understanding of the resources as a basis for management decision is demonstrated.

Trophic model of the coastal fisheries ecosystem of the west coast of peninsular Malaysia

A preliminary mass-balance trophic model was constructed for the coastal fisheries ecosystem of the West Coast of Peninsular Malaysia (0 - 120 m depth). The ecosystem was partitioned into 15 trophic groups, and biomasses for selected groups were obtained from research (trawl) surveys conducted in the area in 1987 and 1991. Trophic interactions of the groups are presented. The network analysis indicates that fishing fleets for demersal fishes and prawns have a major direct or indirect impact on most high-trophic level groups in the ecosystem.

Socioeconomic assessment of marine fisheries of Thailand

Thailand is currently one of the ten largest fishing nations in the world. In 1996, fish production reached 3.7 million t with 90% of the production coming from the marine fisheries sector and 10% from inland fisheries. Thai fishing operates in four fishing grounds namely, the Gulf of Thailand, the Andaman Sea, the South China Sea and the Bay of Bengal. However with the establishment of the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) in 1977, Thailand lost over 300 000 km2 of traditional fishing grounds.

Ecosystem-based management objectives for the North Sea: riding the forage fish rollercoaster

The North Sea provides a useful model for considering forage fish (FF) within ecosystem-based management as it has a complex assemblage of FF species. This paper is designed to encourage further debate and dialogue between stakeholders about management objectives. Changing the management of fisheries on FF will have economic consequences for all fleets in the North Sea. The predators that are vulnerable to the depletion of FF are Sandwich terns, great skua and common guillemots, and to a lesser extent, marine mammals.

A digital approach to surveys in developing countries

In this paper, the authors present a methodology developed for gathering socioeconomic and environmental survey data in the field. The system is divided into two interfaces: i) an Android tablet with survey software for data collection in the field and ii) a back office application for questionnaire management and data compilation. Each of these technical components is detailed and the solutions to challenges and constraints that were faced are described.

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