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Mapping the Bounty of the Coral Triangle

The warm tropical waters of the Coral Triangle in the South Pacific cover a little over 1% of the Earth’s surface, yet are host to over three quarters of all recorded coral species and thousands of fish species. The staggering biological diversity of marine life is sustained by an equally diverse mix of habitats including river estuaries, mangrove forests, seagrass beds and coral reefs. The 6.8 million square kilometers of the Coral Triangle cover the waters around the eastern half of Indonesia, as well as the Philippines, Malaysia, Timor-Leste, Papua New Guinea, and the Solomon Islands.

Sustainable Development in the Coral Triangle

If marine biodiversity is what you are after, then look no further than the Coral Triangle. This remarkable patch of water spans the seas between the six Indo-Pacific nations of Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Timor-Leste, Papua New Guinea, and the Solomon Islands. The tropical waters of the Coral Triangle are among the most biologically diverse – and environmentally vulnerable – regions of the world. The Coral Triangle’s coral reefs, mangrove forests, and seagrass beds are home to vast numbers of fish, sharks and rays, as well as sea turtles and marine mammals.

Improving Solomon Islanders livelihoods and climate change resilience through mangrove ecosystem management

Mangrove ecosystems are critical to the economic needs and livelihoods of many coastal communities in Pacific region.  Mangroves provide an important source of food including fish, shells and fruit as well a source of timber for firewood and building materials.  In addition, mangrove ecosystems play an important role in protecting coastal villages from wind and waves.  Under the threat of climate change, maintaining healthy mangrove ecosystems will help coastal communities build resilience to the impacts of climate change.  Throughout the Pacific however there are increasing threats to mangroves including clearing for urban expansion and felling trees for firewood.

Taking an ecosystem approach to small scale fishing in the tropics

From beach-side communities dotted across the Solomon Islands archipelago, to coastal villages lining Tanzania’s Indian Ocean shoreline, thousands of communities rely on coastal fisheries.

Adaptation Pathways: responding to climate change

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) through its Coral Triangle Initiative (CTI) regional technical assistance (RETA) program is providing technical assistance to five Pacific countries. Through one of its programs - "Strengthening coastal and marine resources management in the Coral Triangle of the Pacific (Phase II)" - they are seeking to improve the resilience of coastal and marine ecosystems in the CTI countries of Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Timor-Leste, as well as neighbouring Fiji and Vanuatu, in the face of multiple drivers of change, including climate change.

More fish from Cambodia’s rice fields

The rice field fisheries (RFFs) of Cambodia cover a large part of the country in practically all areas where rice is cultivated. For human nutrition, fish and other aquatic animals (collectively referred to as ‘fish’ in this project) vary in importance – depending on the typology of the rice field fisheries, the source of the supply (e.g. lake and major rivers) and the demand or ‘need’ for fish as a source of animal protein.

Blue Frontiers : Managing the environmental costs of aquaculture

This global review is a comprehensive analysis of global aquaculture production across all major species and farm production systems. The report aims to inform policy makers about the impacts of aquaculture on the environment and to stimulate debate on the optimal animal food production systems for tomorrow.
 

Biodiversity of Freshwater Ecosystems: status, trends, pressures and conservation priorities

Freshwater in the form of rivers, lakes, groundwater and wetlands offers us a remarkably diverse array of natural functions and ecosystem services. However, there is clear and growing scientific evidence that we are on the verge of a major freshwater biodiversity crisis: in the 30 years between 1970 and 2000, populations of more than 300 freshwater species have declined by ~55 percent while those of terrestrial and marine systems each declined by ~32 percent.

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