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Feed the Future Aquaculture technical assistance brings more profit

Ensan Ali is a fish nursery owner of Pateng village, Tungibaria union, Barisal sadar upazila, Barisal district. He quit the previous job to take over the lead of the farming for his family of seven members.

Nutrient-rich mola fish become popular among farmers

In Bangladesh, changes in the overall agricultural system have seen a continued decline in the areas of inland water and inundation, reducing the habitats for fish. This has contributed to decreased fish harvest, in particular for small fishes like the mola that the rural poor depend on. mola is a nutrient-rich small fish that supplies essential nutrients – in particular vitamin A, calcium, iron and zinc – to these vulnerable population groups.

Cage fish and small fish culture can bring changes for poor of Bangladesh

Throughout Bangladesh there are many and varied water bodies offering considerable potential for fish cultivation. But poor farmers are unable to provide all the inputs required for intensive production methods. 

Algal bioproducts derived from suspended solids in intensive land-based aquaculture

Land-based aquaculture produces suspended solids in culture pond and settlement pond waters that could be harvested as a bioresource. The first aim of this study is to quantify, characterise, and subsequently harvest the suspended solids from two discharge waste streams in pond-based intensive aquaculture.

Shahnaz is a role model for rural women in fish culture

Shahnaz Dewan, a former elected member of local government, lives in Adabari village in Tangail District, Bangladesh. While Shanaz was engaged in household activity and social work, her husband used traditional methods of raising Indian Major Carp in his pond and she had very little involvement in fish culture.
 

Cage-pond integration of African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) with carps

Cage-pond integration system is a new model for enhancing productivity of pond aquaculture system. A field trial was conducted using African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in cages and carps in earthen ponds.

Autonomous adaptation to climate change by shrimp and catfish farmers in Vietnam’s Mekong River delta

Kam, S.P. ; Badjeck, M.C. ; Teh, L. ; Teh, L. ; Tran, N. 2012. Working paper 2012-24. WorldFish. Penang, Malaysia

The Mekong River delta of Vietnam supports a thriving aquaculture industry but is exposed to the impacts of climate change. In particular, sea level rise and attendant increased flooding (both coastal and riverine) and coastal salinity intrusion threaten the long-term viability of this important industry. This working paper summarizes an analysis of the economics of aquaculture adaptation in the delta, focusing on the grow-out of two exported aquaculture species—the freshwater striped catfish and the brackish-water tiger shrimp. The analysis was conducted for four pond-based production systems: catfish in the inland and coastal provinces and improved extensive and semi-intensive/intensive shrimp culture.

Evolving solutions for new horizons: Reflections on a conversation

Podcast: Stephen reflects on the outcomes of Seaweb's 10th International Seafood Summit, that was held in Hong Kong from September 5-8, 2012.

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