Rice/carp farming in the Philippines and cultural acceptance

In response to inland fisheries demands for more manageable species of fish, development agencies in the Philippines have turned some attention to common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and its culture in rice paddies. Tilapia, which have been used exten-sively in rice fields, require more management than carp. With the advent of integrated fish farming and agriculture

Progress and the future for tilapia farming and seed production in Bangladesh

Tilapia farming has great potential in Bangladesh. Tilapia promises to become a primary cultured species for freshwater and brackish water ecosystems, and therefore may also be a major source of employment. Bangladesh could become one of the leading Asian countries for tilapia seed production and grow-out farming. This article looks at the current status of Tilapia farming and seed production in Bangladesh.

Production economics of Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) pond culture in El-Fayum Governorate, Egypt

Econometric techniques were used to estimate a production function for tilapia pond culture in El-Fayum Governorate, Egypt, utilizing cross-sectional field data. Explanatory variables were feed, initial stocking weight, and pond size. The function was used to examine returns to scale, estimate the productivity of feed and initial stocking weight, and estimate the profit maximizing demand equations for feed and fingerlings. Diminishing returns to scale seem to exist for tilapia pond culture.

Pond polyculture technologies combat micronutrient deficiencies and increase household income in Bangladesh

Two sustainable, low-cost pond polyculture technologies have been developed to culture carps and mola in ponds, and culture carps and mola in ponds connected to rice fields. These technologies can increase total fish production from ponds. Farmers depend on carps as an income source, and mola is rich in micronutrients that can help to meet the nutritional requirements of the rural poor, particularly women and young children.

Meeting the food and nutrition needs of the poor: the role of fish and the opportunities and challenges emerging from the rise of aquaculture

People who are food and nutrition insecure largely reside in Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa and for many, fish represents a rich source of protein, micronutrients and essential fatty acids. The contribution of fish to household food and nutrition security depends upon availability, access and cultural and personal preferences. Access is largely determined by location, seasonality and price but at the individual level it also depends upon a person's physiological and health status and how fish is prepared, cooked and shared among household members.

Kenya pioneers intensive tank culture of tilapia

Although it appears that the first recorded, scientifically oriented culture of tilapia was conducted in Kenya in 1924,of the current 30,000 ponds with a potential annual production of more than 7,000 tons, only 10% are functional producing 500 tons/annum. Tilapia tank culture at Baobab Farm is described in detail. The economics and prospectsof intensive culture in Kenya are considered.

Integrated fish farming in Thailand

Aquaculture in Thailand is relatively recent. Formerly, there were ample freshwater fish in natural water bodies such as lakes, rivers and canals, but with decreasing catches due to overfishing, pesticide use, and a reduction in the flood plain fishery associated with the construction of irrigation systems, there has been a surge of interest in aquaculture. In contrast to the relatively well defined and stable Chinese system of integrated fish farming, Thai systems are characterized by instability since aquaculture in the country is experiencing a period of rapid evolution.

Increased production of small fish in wetlands combats micronutrient deficiencies in Bangladesh

Increased production of mola and other small fish can be achieved through stock enhancement and sustainable management of natural wetlands. Enhanced fish production can increase consumption and provide nutritional benefits, especially for women and young children, as they suffer from high rates of malnutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies. Mola and other small fish, which are eaten whole, have high contents of vitamins and minerals. In recent years, there has been a reduction in fish production and biodiversity in wetland areas of Bangladesh.

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