Meeting the food and nutrition needs of the poor: the role of fish and the opportunities and challenges emerging from the rise of aquaculture

People who are food and nutrition insecure largely reside in Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa and for many, fish represents a rich source of protein, micronutrients and essential fatty acids. The contribution of fish to household food and nutrition security depends upon availability, access and cultural and personal preferences. Access is largely determined by location, seasonality and price but at the individual level it also depends upon a person's physiological and health status and how fish is prepared, cooked and shared among household members.

Integrated fish farming in Thailand

Aquaculture in Thailand is relatively recent. Formerly, there were ample freshwater fish in natural water bodies such as lakes, rivers and canals, but with decreasing catches due to overfishing, pesticide use, and a reduction in the flood plain fishery associated with the construction of irrigation systems, there has been a surge of interest in aquaculture. In contrast to the relatively well defined and stable Chinese system of integrated fish farming, Thai systems are characterized by instability since aquaculture in the country is experiencing a period of rapid evolution.

Improving productivity and environmental performance of aquaculture

Fish—including finfish and shellfish—are an important item in the human food basket, contributing 17 percent of the global animal-based protein supply in 2010. They are an especially valuable food source in developing countries, where more than 75 percent of the world’s fish consumption occurs. In addition to protein, fish contain micronutrients and longchain omega-3 fatty acids that are essential for maternal and child health, but often deficient in the diets of the poor.

Fish diversity and fish consumption in Bangladesh

Bangladesh prides itself on being very rich in fish diversity. Its numeroud and diverse inland waterbodies and paddy fields are home to over 267 freshwater fish species. Biodiversity of fish species is important for nutrition and livelihoods of the rural poor in Bangladesh. There are promising fisheries technologies which have been developed and are being practised for improving fish biodiversity and nutrition.

Fish culture in homestead tanks in Nigeria: practices, problems and prospects.

The results are presented of a 2-year study conducted regarding management practices and problems associated with raising fish in concrete tanks in Nigeria. The location and construction of the tanks, which were used toculture Clarias gariepinus, Tilapia guineensis and Heterobranchus bidorsalis , are described, and suggestions made for overcoming the problems involved, which were mainly due to poor management skills. Major problems identified included incidence of "broken skull" disease in C.

Farmers' attitudes in Malawi to the use of excreta in fish farming

The findings are presented of a survey conducted in Malawi to determine the acceptability by fish farmers of raisingfish in excreta-fed ponds. The use of livestock excreta appeared to be acceptable to the majority of farmers, whereas the use of human excreta was not. Various recommendations are made regarding the promotion of the use of excreta in small-holder farms.

Effect of freshwater toxic and non toxic cyanobacteria, (Microcystis aeruginosa) strains on some biochemical parameters of Oreochromis niloticus

This study was planned to determine the grazing rate of O. niloticus from both toxic and non toxic strains of Microcystis aeruginosa with its effect on fish health through study of some clinical signs, hematological and biochemical parameters.

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