Increased production of small fish in wetlands combats micronutrient deficiencies in Bangladesh

Increased production of mola and other small fish can be achieved through stock enhancement and sustainable management of natural wetlands. Enhanced fish production can increase consumption and provide nutritional benefits, especially for women and young children, as they suffer from high rates of malnutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies. Mola and other small fish, which are eaten whole, have high contents of vitamins and minerals. In recent years, there has been a reduction in fish production and biodiversity in wetland areas of Bangladesh.

Improving productivity and environmental performance of aquaculture

Fish—including finfish and shellfish—are an important item in the human food basket, contributing 17 percent of the global animal-based protein supply in 2010. They are an especially valuable food source in developing countries, where more than 75 percent of the world’s fish consumption occurs. In addition to protein, fish contain micronutrients and longchain omega-3 fatty acids that are essential for maternal and child health, but often deficient in the diets of the poor.

Fish diversity and fish consumption in Bangladesh

Bangladesh prides itself on being very rich in fish diversity. Its numeroud and diverse inland waterbodies and paddy fields are home to over 267 freshwater fish species. Biodiversity of fish species is important for nutrition and livelihoods of the rural poor in Bangladesh. There are promising fisheries technologies which have been developed and are being practised for improving fish biodiversity and nutrition.

Effects of stocking density on production and economics of all-male tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) culture in a rain fed rice-fish ecosystem

Effects of stocking density on the growth, production, and economics of all-male tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were investigated in a rain-fed rice-fish ecosystem for a period of 120 days. Fish were stocked at the rate of 4000, 5000, and 6000 ha-1 in treatments T1, T2, and T3, respectively. Water quality was suitable for fish culture. Significantly higher growth was observed in T1 as compared to other treatments. SGR ranged from 1.26 to 1.51. Survival varied between 79% and 88% with treatment T1 producing the highest survival.

Effect of freshwater toxic and non toxic cyanobacteria, (Microcystis aeruginosa) strains on some biochemical parameters of Oreochromis niloticus

This study was planned to determine the grazing rate of O. niloticus from both toxic and non toxic strains of Microcystis aeruginosa with its effect on fish health through study of some clinical signs, hematological and biochemical parameters.

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