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Innovative program to boost African fish trade and improve livelihoods

WorldFish, African Union Inter-African Bureau for Animal Resources (AU-IBAR) and the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) Planning and Coordinating Agency recently launched an innovative program that will improve the quality of life for small-scale fish traders in Africa, many of whom are women. The fish trade is crucial to ensuring food security in Africa, supporting livelihoods and promoting economic development.
 

Taming the king of fish: adapting Hilsa to aquaculture

The Ganges–Brahmaputra River Delta is the world’s largest delta, stretching across Bangladesh and West Bengal in northeast India and supporting a population of over 250 million people. Of all the fish in these tropical delta waters, the Hilsa (Tenualosa ilisha) holds a special place in the hearts and in the diets of people living in the region. The Hilsa is known locally as Macher Raja Ilish, or Hilsa the “king of fish” and has the honor of being the national fish of Bangladesh. Maintaining good supplies of wild Hilsa is an ongoing challenge in the face of threats from overfishing, habitat destruction and degradation, and the voracious appetite of an ever increasing population. Hilsa aquaculture may be one of the solutions.

Sustainable Trade in Ethical Aquaculture

Trade in farmed aquatic products is growing rapidly. Over 50% of fish production is traded internationally. The export of fin fish and shellfish from Asia to Europe is now, in value terms, the most important internationally traded food commodity sector. However, there are major issues regarding the sustainability of this trade from ecological, public health and broader ethical perspectives.
 

Sub-Saharan Fish Trade and Nutrition in a Changing Climate

There is an increasing ‘fish gap’ in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where fish supplies have failed to keep pace with the region’s growing demand. Despite the high dependence on fish for nutrition in much of the region, consumption is currently half the global average and declining.
 
In SSA, as in many other regions globally, marine and inland capture fisheries resources are stagnating or decreasing, largely due to environmental or ecosystem changes and over-exploitation. Climate change is already altering the distribution of fish stocks and rainfall patterns upon which these fisheries depend. At the same time, globalization has favoured developing country exports of high-value fish.
 
 

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