Trading-off fish biodiversity, food security, and hydropower in the Mekong River Basin

The Mekong River Basin, site of the biggest inland fishery in the world, is undergoing massive hydropower development. Planned dams will block critical fish migration routes between the river's downstream floodplains and upstream tributaries. Here we estimate fish biomass and biodiversity losses in numerous damming scenarios using a simple ecological model of fish migration. Our framework allows detailing trade-offs between dam locations, power production, and impacts on fish resources.

The pattern of fish trade

An account is given of the general pattern regarding trade in fish products. Developed countries import more than they export, whereas developing countries import less. Problems involved and remedies are discussed, considering Southeast Asia in particular.

Fish production, consumption and trade in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review analysis

This analysis is an output of Sub-Saharan Fish Trade in a Changing Climate, a World Bank–funded study conducted in 2010–2011 by WorldFish. Its overall objective is to develop an understanding of the supply and demand for low-value, regionally and domestically traded fish, which are important in the diets of lower-income urban and rural consumers in Sub-Saharan Africa, to inform cooperation on trade and food security and projection of regional trends in supply and demand for food fish.

Vulnerability of female fish traders to HIV/AIDS along the fish market chain of the south-eastern arm of Lake Malawi: Analysis report

The objectives of this study were first, to understand the market chain of fish as traded by women in the south-eastern Arm of Lake Malawi, with a specific focus on analyzing how fish is moved from the lake to the wholesale market. Secondly, the study identifies HIV/AIDS vulnerability factors along this market chain i.e. from the point of catch to the wholesale market.

Strategic review of the fishery situation in Thailand

Fisheries are an important source of animal protein for most of Thailand’s population, particularly in provinces on or near the coast. Between 1978 and 1997 the per capita consumption of fish averaged 24 kg·capita-1 annually. In 1995, about 535 210 people were involved in the fisheries sector and 44% of these were engaged in small scale marine capture fisheries. Since 1982, Thailand has faced problems with the development of marine capture fisheries and their over-exploitation which has increased fishery conflicts and disputes with neighboring countries.

Fish Trade for a Better Future program brochure

Over the past 5 years, fish processors and traders, along with government leaders, have begun to demand a change in the way Africa trades its fish. In May 2014, the second Conference of African Ministers of Fisheries and Aquaculture (CAMFA) endorsed the African Union Policy Framework and Reform Strategy for Fisheries and Aquaculture in Africa, which prioritizes fish trade and aims to promote responsible and equitable fish trade and marketing by significantly harnessing the benefits of Africa’s fisheries and aquaculture.

Choosing the best model in the presence of zero trade: a fish product analysis

The purpose of the paper is to test the hypothesis that food safety (chemical) standards act as barriers to international seafood imports. We use zero-accounting gravity models to test the hypothesis that food safety (chemical) standards act as barriers to international seafood imports. The chemical standards on which we focus include chloramphenicol required performance limit, oxytetracycline maximum residue limit, fluoro-quinolones maximum residue limit, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) pesticide residue limit.

Warning signs unheeded in South Pacific invertebrate trade

Nearshore marine resources play a significant role in the lives of South Pacific islanders and can be critical to the economies of nations in the region. However, few countries have adequate management controls in place to ensure harvests remain at sustainable levels, and so determining current levels of utilization is far from easy. A lack of information about the volume of both domestic and international trade in marine invertebrates in high demand is a growing concern.

A taste for live fish: Hong Kong's live reef fish market.

This paper provides an overview of the live reef fish market in Hong Kong, which accounted for about 15,000 t/yr (US$345 million) of live fish imports in the mid-1990s. The live fish trade has spawned a number of management concerns, including overfishing of highly-valued species, use of destructive fishing techniques and human health risks. Recent actions by the Hong Kong government in response to these concerns are reported and possible region-wide initiatives are briefly discussed in this paper.

The sustainable livelihoods approach to the development of freshwater prawn marketing systems in Southwest Bangladesh

A conceptual framework, drawn from an approach to poverty reduction known as the Sustainable Livelihoods Approach (SLA), is applied to understanding the role of freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) marketing systems in southwest Bangladesh. Freshwater prawn marketing potentially provides economic returns and social benefits to the rural poor. Although the potential benefits are great, a number of constraints were identified for the longterm sustainability of prawn marketing systems.

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