Strengthening collective action to address resource conflict in Lake Kariba, Zambia

Where natural resources are a key component of the rural economy, the ability of the poor to realize their visions for the future depends significantly on institutional structures that govern resource access and management. This case study reports on an initiative on the shores of Lake Kariba in Zambia, where lakeshore residents face competition over fishing, tourism, and commercial aquaculture.

South Pacific tuna and billfish program

The Tuna and Billfish Assessment Programme is a 3-year programme designed to provide a better understanding of the stocks of tuna and billfish throughout the central and western Pacific and also to determine the status of the stocks of the commercially important species. It will provide data as a basis for the assessment of optimum yields and will provide governments with information upon which sound fisheries development and resource management can be based. The specific topics to be covered by the Programme are listed.

Status and management of the Java sea fisheries

The Java Sea is a major fishing ground in Indonesia contributing 31% of the national marine fisheries production. Demersal and small pelagic fishery resources account for most production in the area. During the 1960s and 1970s, strong demand for fish, which in Indonesia resulted from both increased human population and increased per capita fish consumption, stimulated the development of fishing in the Java Sea. This led to development of up-stream and down-stream industries, increases in employment opportunities, and increases in the number of fishers and fishing households.

The realities of fishery management in the Southeast Asia region

Fishery management, particularly in Southeast Asia, is concerned primarily with people problems rather than resource problems. It cannot be successful unless viewed in the context of rural development. Conventional constraints to management include lack of theory, lack of data, lack of trained personnel, lack of institutional infrastructure, lack of physical infrastructure and gear conflicts.

Payments for hilsa fish (Tenualosa ilisha) conservation in Bangladesh

Hilsa was once abundantly available in the 100 rivers of Bangladesh. Fishermen used to catch plenty of hilsa which were sold fresh to the local and urban markets. It was a cheap fish and was affordable even to the poor. However, its population has declined significantly over the last 30 years. Such a decline in catches prompted the government of Bangladesh to declare four sites in the country's coastal rivers as hilsa sanctuaries restricting fishing during the breeding season.

A National Framework for Fisheries Co-management in Ghana

This brief proposes a dual structure for adaptive fisheries co-management. building upon the disappointments of earlier attempts at community based fisheries management, it recognizes the differences inherent in the management of highly migratory pelagics while encouraging local management units to develop and implement plans that improve conditions at landing sites and manage artisanal fisheries for non-migratory species in selected near-shore areas.

Mariculture development and livelihood diversification in the Philippines

This paper aims to evaluate mariculture as sustainable livelihood diversification option for coastal fishers in the Philippines and guide policy development in this direction. Mariculture in the Philippines refers to the culture of finfishes, shellfish, seaweeds and other commodities in cages, pens, stakes and rafts in marine environment. This paper evaluates the biophysical and socioeconomic contexts in which mariculture operate.

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