Methods of consensus building for community-based fisheries management in Bangladesh and the Mekong Delta

A method of consensus building for management of wetlands and fisheries using a systematic approach to participatory planning and initially developed in Bangladesh is now being applied in both Bangladesh and the Mekong delta. The method recognizes diversity in livelihoods and works through a structured learning and planning process that focuses on common interests. It works with each category of stakeholder separately to prioritize the natural resource problems that their livelihoods are largely dependent on; they then share and agree common priorities in plenary.

Marine fisheries resources of the north coast of Central Java, Indonesia

A trophic model of the marine fisheries resources of the north coast of Central Java, Indonesia was constructed using the Ecopath with Ecosim software and data from a trawl survey conducted in the area in 1979. The model consists of 27 ecological groups with a mean trophic level of 3.04. The exploited fishery was then a moderately mature and relatively stable system. The impact of the fishery at the time was low to moderate in comparison with the fisheries in other systems and notably in later time periods.

Legal issues pertaining to community based fisheries management

The Bangladesh Environmental Lawyers Association (BELA) provided legal support to the CBFM-2 project and in particular to the 130 Community Based Organisations established under the project. The project was implemented against an uncertain legal background due to many changes in the way that wetlands and fisheries in Bangladesh have been managed over recent decades. Many of the key interventions, such as sanctuaries have yet to receive legal recognition.

Is Aquaculture pro-poor? Empirical evidence of impacts on fish consumption in Bangladesh

Aquaculture is widely held to contribute to poverty reduction and food security in the Global South, but robust evidence is limited. Using nationally representative data from Bangladesh, this study analyses changes in fish consumption from 2000 to 2010. Rapid expansion of commercial aquaculture pegged down fish prices, resulting in increased fish consumption by extreme poor and moderate poor consumers and those in rural areas. These outcomes are closely linked to the pro-poor nature of national economic growth during this period.

The ICLARM -IFDR multidisciplinary study of small-scale fisheries of San Miguel Bay, Philippines.

Recent attempts to improve the income levels of municipal fishermen in the Philippines have included a veriety offinancing schemes, the formation of associations and cooperatives and extension work by the Bureau of Fisheriesand Aquatic Resources. Work currently being carried out in the San Miguel Bay area is outlined.

Human rights approaches to governing fisheries (Editorial)

Human rights are about more than political and civil rights, they also include a bundle of “economic, social and cultural rights” which include rights to food, water, housing, and decent work, and the rights of children, migrants and women. Each of these rights has a legal framework supporting it, which forms the international architecture of human rights law.

Hidden harvest: The global contribution of capture fisheries

The important contribution of fi sheries to human well-being is frequently underestimated. This report highlights that contribution. The report focuses on small-scale fi sheries and developing countries because the livelihoods of 90 percent of the 120 million employed in fi sheries are in the small-scale fi sheries, and almost all of those workers, 97 percent, live in developing countries. Many small-scale fi shing communities have high levels of poverty, and poverty reduction is a core focus of the contributing partners to the report.

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