Navigating change: Second-generation challenges of small-scale fisheries co-management in the Philippines and Vietnam

Early efforts to apply the concept of fisheries co-management in Southeast Asia focused primarily on building the effectiveness of local management institutions and advocating the merits of the approach so that it would be applied in new sites, while gradually learning and adapting to a range of obstacles in practice. Today, with co-management widely embraced by the research community and adopted as policy by an increasing number of governments, a second-generation perspective has emerged.

Mollusc fisheries in Thailand

Shellfish production in Thailand has ranged between 50,000 and 300,000 mt over the past twenty years, with recent production around 120,000 mt/yr. Major species are green (Perna viridis ) and horse mussels (Modiolus senhausenii ) making some 60% of total production. The other main types, in order, are short-necked clams (Paphia undulata ) ark shells (Andara granosa ) and oysters (Crassostrea sp.). Culture practices account for 80% of green mussel, cockle and oyster production. Culture began to boom in the mid-seventies following a decline in production of the fisheries.

Mfumo wa Ikolojia katika uvuvi mdogomdogo unaoendeshwa kwenye bahari za tropiki: Tanzania

Usimamizi hafifu wa uvuvi umechangia katika uharibifu wa rasilmali, kukuza umaskini na ukosefu wa uhakika wa chakula duniani kote. Ili kudhibiti hali hii, mfumo wa ikolojia, unaotoa kipaumbele kwenye uendelevu na usawa katika usimamizi wa uvuvi, umebuniwa. Mpango huu unaoendeleza mfumo wa ikolojia katika uvuvi mdogomdogo wa bahari kwenye maeneo ya tropiki, unafadhiliwa na European Union, na unaongozwa na Taasisi ya WorldFish. Mpango huu unatekelezwa kwa ushirikiano na nchi za Indonesia, Philippines, visiwa vya Solomon na Tanzania.

Marine fisheries statistics in Southeast Asia: a critical appraisal

The major fishing countries of Southeast Asia: Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand exploit what is probably the richest and most extensive area of tropical fisheries in the world. The total annual landings in these four countries exceed five million tons. How that figure is derived, as well as the shortcomings in national statistics are discussed in this article.

Managing fisheries for human and food security

We evaluate the current status of the global marine fisheries using the frameworks of conflict, food security and vulnerability. Existing trends suggest that there is likely to be greater food insecurity and fisheries conflicts due to issues such as: declining fishery resources; a North–South divide in investment; changing consumption patterns; increasing reliance on fishery resources for coastal communities; and inescapable poverty traps creating by low net resource productivity and few alternatives.

The management of tropical multispecies fisheries

A brief review is presented of some of the measures taken to manage tropical multispecies fisheries in different parts of the world. An examination is also made of other government decisions, e.g. on investment, that can affect the amount of fishing and the way in which these resources are used. The contrast is drawn between the pattern of management that is supposed to occur in advanced countries- careful scientific research, preparation of scientific advice, decision on the desired measures, and implementation and enforcement- with what happens in practice in developing countries.

Legal issues pertaining to community based fisheries management

The Bangladesh Environmental Lawyers Association (BELA) provided legal support to the CBFM-2 project and in particular to the 130 Community Based Organisations established under the project. The project was implemented against an uncertain legal background due to many changes in the way that wetlands and fisheries in Bangladesh have been managed over recent decades. Many of the key interventions, such as sanctuaries have yet to receive legal recognition.

Is Aquaculture pro-poor? Empirical evidence of impacts on fish consumption in Bangladesh

Aquaculture is widely held to contribute to poverty reduction and food security in the Global South, but robust evidence is limited. Using nationally representative data from Bangladesh, this study analyses changes in fish consumption from 2000 to 2010. Rapid expansion of commercial aquaculture pegged down fish prices, resulting in increased fish consumption by extreme poor and moderate poor consumers and those in rural areas. These outcomes are closely linked to the pro-poor nature of national economic growth during this period.

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