Solomon Islands: Western Province situation analysis

Aquatic agricultural systems (AAS) are places where farming and fishing in freshwater and/or coastal ecosystems contribute significantly to household income and food security. Globally, the livelihoods of many poor and vulnerable people are dependent on these systems. In recognition of the importance of AAS, the CGIAR Research Program (CRP) is undertaking a new generation of global agricultural research programs on key issues affecting global food security and rural development.

Solomon Islands: Western Hub scoping report

Aquatic agricultural systems (AAS) are places where farming and fishing in freshwater and/or coastal ecosystems contribute significantly to household income and food security. Globally, the livelihoods of many poor and vulnerable people are dependent on these systems. In recognition of the importance of AAS, the CGIAR Research Program (CRP) is undertaking a new generation of global agricultural research programs on key issues affecting global food security and rural development. The overall goal of the research program is to improve the well-being of people dependent on these systems.

Solomon Islands State of the Coral Triangle Report: Summary

The Solomon Islands National Plan of Action (SI-NPOA): Coral Triangle Initiative on Coral Reefs, Fisheries, and Food Security (CTI-CFF) provides visionary guidance for the management of coral reefs and related ecosystems in the Solomon Islands (Ministry of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and Meteorology and Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, 2010). It is consistent with the CTI Regional Plan of Action (RPOA), but also incorporates local situations and circumstances.

Solomon Islands Aquatic Agricultural Systems program design document

WorldFish is leading the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems together with two other CGIAR Centers; the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) and Bioversity. In 2012 and 2013 the AAS Program rolled out in Solomon Islands, Zambia, Bangladesh, Cambodia and the Philippines. Aquatic Agricultural Systems are places where farming and fishing in freshwater and/or coastal ecosystems contribute significantly to household income and food security. The program goal is to improve the well-being of AAS-dependent people.

The socio-economic context for improving food security through land based aquaculture in Solomon Islands: A peri-urban case study

Future fish demand-supply scenarios project that investment in aquaculture will be needed to ensure fish for food security in Solomon Islands. In 2010 a study of two peri-urban areas of Solomon Islands analysed the demand and potential for inland aquaculture, and the role of the introduced Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) in household livelihoods and existing value chains. Of 178 households interviewed, marine reef fish were the preferred fish for consumption, although tinned fish was also common.

SmartFarm monitoring and evaluation framework and strategy white paper

This report is a deliverable under the Terms of Reference – SmartFarm M&E Framework Development, dated June 2013. The purpose of this report is two-fold. Primarily, to set out a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework and strategy for the World Fish Center’s SmartFarm project. Secondarily, to link this framework and strategy to the wider CGIAR Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) Project and Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) program, under which SmartFarm is a key component, as well as to existing World Fish M&E approaches.

Small-scale aquaculture development model for rural Nepal

The majority of rural farmers in Nepal are small holders and their livelihood is based on agriculture. Three projects on small- scale aquaculture, with focus on women’s involvement, were completed in Kathar and Kawasoti Village Development Committees (VDCs) of Chitwan and Nawalparasi districts, respectively during 2000-2007. Based on the experience from these projects, guidelines/ steps for the development of small-scale aquaculture in rural areas were drawn.

Small-scale aquaculture, development and poverty: a reassessment

The potential of small-scale aquaculture (SSA) to contribute to development goals including poverty reduction and improved food security has been widely discussed. These accounts emphasize the following characteristics of SSA: the relative poverty of practising households; the subsistence or semi-subsistence nature of the activity; its role as a means of agricultural diversification; its contribution to food security; family ownership and operation of production or reliance on predominantly family labour; and utilization of small areas of land and/or water.

Shrimp (Penaeus monodon) farming in the coastal areas of Bangladesh: Challenges and prospects towards sustainable development

This chapter mainly presents the history of shrimp aquaculture in Bangladesh and impacts of shrimp farming on rural livelihoods with particular focus on income and dietary consumption, based on literature reviews and structured field surveys. The chapter also focuses on the complexities of land use patterns and recommends a holistic approach to adopt integrated zoning principles into national policies to sustain shrimp farming in Bangladesh.

The Role of Fish in the First 1,000 Days in Zambia

Fish is especially rich in essential omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and micronutrients, including bioavailable calcium, iron and zinc. Fish features prominently in the diet of most, especially poor, Zambians. Despite this, its significance in the diet of women and children in the first 1,000 days is not well understood. Our current knowledge of the nutrient content of commonly consumed fish species in Zambia is synthesised.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Food security