Women and gender participation in the fisheries sector in Lake Victoria

The paper starts with an analysis of the gender roles of women in the fisheries sector. These roles are recognized inthree stages of production: fishing, processing and marketing. Further, the paper looks at the impacts of genderroles in promoting or hindering the involvement of women in fisheries research, development, and management. Lastly, the paper develops recommendations that will ensure the effective participation of women in themanagement of Lake Victoria fisheries resources.

Vulnerability of female fish traders to HIV/AIDS along the fish market chain of the south-eastern arm of Lake Malawi: Analysis report

The objectives of this study were first, to understand the market chain of fish as traded by women in the south-eastern Arm of Lake Malawi, with a specific focus on analyzing how fish is moved from the lake to the wholesale market. Secondly, the study identifies HIV/AIDS vulnerability factors along this market chain i.e. from the point of catch to the wholesale market.

Sustaining aquaculture by developing human capacity and enhancing opportunities for women

Women are active participants in aquaculture supply chains, but a dearth of gender-disaggregated information hampers accurate understanding of their contribution. Research results and FAO National Aquaculture Sector Overview (NASO) fact sheets show that female participation rates vary by type and scale of enterprise and country. Women are frequently active in hatcheries and dominate fish processing plant labourers. Women’s work in small-scale aquaculture frequently is unrecognized, under or unpaid.

Socio-cultural dynamics shaping the potential of aquaculture to deliver development outcomes

There is growing appreciation of the role of aquaculture in diversifying livelihoods of the poor. However, prevailing cultural norms and values, and social relations often influence its development outcomes, which we explore in this study. Socio-cultural dynamics affect the capacity of resource-poor and marginalized groups for the adoption and retention of aquaculture technologies.

A preliminary assessment of the coastal fishery resources in India: socioeconomic and bioeconomic perspective

India is endowed with a continental shelf of 0.5 million km2 and an exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of about 2 million km2. Almost half (39%) of the Indian population utilizes the marine fisheries resources. India ranked sixth worldwide in total fish production (4.95 million t) and second in inland fish production (2.24 million t) during 1995 - 96. Fish production expanded from 0.75 million t in 1950 - 51 to 4.95 million t in 1995 - 96, giving a significant increase at a cumulative growth rate of 4.2% per annum.

Informal fish retailing in rural Egypt: Opportunities to enhance income and work conditions for women and men

Poor rural consumers benefit from Egypt’s aquaculture sector through access to small and medium-sized farmed tilapia sold by informal fish retailers, many of whom are women. In fact, informal fish retail is the main, if not only, segment of the farmed fish value chain where women are found. This report aims to inform current and future strategies to improve conditions in informal fish retail by understanding in more depth the similarities and differences in employment quality and outcomes across different fish retailers.

Increased production of small fish in wetlands combats micronutrient deficiencies in Bangladesh

Increased production of mola and other small fish can be achieved through stock enhancement and sustainable management of natural wetlands. Enhanced fish production can increase consumption and provide nutritional benefits, especially for women and young children, as they suffer from high rates of malnutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies. Mola and other small fish, which are eaten whole, have high contents of vitamins and minerals. In recent years, there has been a reduction in fish production and biodiversity in wetland areas of Bangladesh.

Human rights approaches to governing fisheries (Editorial)

Human rights are about more than political and civil rights, they also include a bundle of “economic, social and cultural rights” which include rights to food, water, housing, and decent work, and the rights of children, migrants and women. Each of these rights has a legal framework supporting it, which forms the international architecture of human rights law.

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