Fish for the future: Fisheries development and food security for Kiribati in an era of global climate change

The Republic of Kiribati is a vast South Pacific island group with one of the largest exclusive economic zones (EEZs) in the world. Kiribati waters support a wealth of marine fisheries activities. These activities occur in oceanic, coastal and inshore environments and range from large, foreign, industrial-scale oceanic fishing operations to small-scale, domestic, inshore subsistence fisheries, aquaculture and recreational fisheries.

Collaborative effort to operationalize the gender transformative approach in the Barotse Floodplain

The gender transformative approach (GTA) being pursued by the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) seeks to address the causes and consequences of gender inequalities. Aquatic agricultural systems are those in which production in natural freshwater and/ or coastal ecosystems contribute substantially to people’s food, nutrition and economic security. This CRP is implemented by WorldFish, International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Bioversity International and a wide range of research and development partners.

CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health

In the developing world, more than 1 billion people depend on fish for most of their animal protein, and another 1 billion people depend on livestock. Poor people, especially women and children, typically eat very little meat, milk and fish. This contributes to nutrient deficiencies and poor physical and cognitive development for children and poor health and livelihood outcomes for adults.

Carp-SIS polyculture: A new intervention to improve women’s livelihoods, income and nutrition in Terai, Nepal

Based on lessons learned from field trials, carp-small indigenous fish species (SIS)-prawn polyculture technology was improved to a "carp-SIS polyculture" technology suitable for small scale farmers in Terai, Nepal. In December 2008, the project was initiated to improve income and nutrition of Tharu women in Chitwan (100 farmers) and Kailali (26 farmers) districts. The present paper presents the final results of the project.

Building coalitions, creating change: An agenda for gender transformative research in agricultural development

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) has developed its Gender Research in Development Strategy centered on a transformative approach. Translating this strategy into actual research and development practice poses a considerable challenge, as not much (documented) experience exists in the agricultural sector to draw on, and significant innovation is required. A process of transformative change requires reflecting on multiple facets and dimensions simultaneously.

Annual report 2013/2014

Improving the productivity of fisheries and aquaculture is vital to reducing hunger and poverty for millions of people in the developing world. Today, fish provides more than one billion poor people with most of their daily animal-source protein and, globally, more than 250 million people depend directly on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihoods; millions more are employed in fisheries and aquaculture value chains.

AAS 2013 Annual report

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) takes an innovative approach to improving the lives of poor and vulnerable rural households. It aims to directly benefit some 6 million people (in Asia’s mega deltas, the island systems of the Pacific and Southeast Asia, and Africa’s inland waters), and through scaling with partners to reach 15 million more. By sharing its learning, the program aims to extend the benefits of its approaches to many more people living in other complex systems.

Trading fish for sex in sub-Saharan Africa

Chris Béné's article "Women and Fish-for-Sex" (FFS) is being highlighted in this issue of id21. The researchers use the example of a small-scale fishing community in the Kafue flats region of Zambia, and review other cases in the world. They demonstrate how economic impoverishment, which is often put forward to explain FFS transactions, is too simplistic to capture the complexity of the FFS phenomenon.

Small fish can mean big nutrition

Malnutrition levels in Bangladesh are amongst the highest in the world. Approximately half of Bangladesh’s population lives below the food poverty line and the dietary intake of both adults and children are severely deficient in key vitamins and minerals. It is now understood that women and children are the more food-insecure and micronutrient-deficient in the population.

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