Aquaculture and resilience: Women in aquaculture in Nepal

Farming-based rural livelihoods are becoming increasingly vulnerable to the effects of global climate change and sudden and profound changes in social and economic systems. Diversification of livelihood options is believed to be vital to maintaining ecosystem resilience and building social systems resilience. Integrated agriculture-aquaculture (IAA) farming systems, considered among the promising options for small-scale farming households in China and Vietnam, are likely be relevant in the context of mixed crop- livestock farming systems elsewhere as well.

Annual report 2013/2014

Improving the productivity of fisheries and aquaculture is vital to reducing hunger and poverty for millions of people in the developing world. Today, fish provides more than one billion poor people with most of their daily animal-source protein and, globally, more than 250 million people depend directly on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihoods; millions more are employed in fisheries and aquaculture value chains.

Women's traditional fishery and alternative aquatic resource livelihood strategies in the Southern Cameroonian Rainforest

To inform the development of alternative livelihoods, the women's traditional alok fishery in the Campo-Ma'an National Park and buffer zone of southern Cameroon were studied over 15 months. Participatory rural appraisal was used to characterise livelihood strategies among 45 households. Thirty-three cultured crops, nine farmed animal species and 65 non-timber forest products, including 31 bushmeat species are cultivated in, or harvested from, the forest. Transport is a major impediment to commercial trade of all local products.

Small fish can mean big nutrition

Malnutrition levels in Bangladesh are amongst the highest in the world. Approximately half of Bangladesh’s population lives below the food poverty line and the dietary intake of both adults and children are severely deficient in key vitamins and minerals. It is now understood that women and children are the more food-insecure and micronutrient-deficient in the population.

Role of women in small-scale aquaculture development in southeastern Cambodia

In Cambodia, women make up more than 65% of the adult population. They play a most important role in all spheres of social and economic activities. A recent investigation has shown that in small scale aquaculture, women have been found to contribute more than men in almost all activities. Details about this are discussed in this article.

The role of small indigenous fish species in food and nutrition security in Bangladesh.

In Bangladesh, only 6% of the daily food intake is animal food of which fish accounts for 50%. Rice is the mainstay, making up 60% of the daily food intake. However, many nutrients such as vitamins A and C, iron, calcium, zinc and iodine are not found in rice and have to be obtained from other sources. Small indigenous fish are a vital contribution to the diet of the rural poor in Bangladesh, where more than 30,000 children go blind every year from vitamin A deficiency and 70% of women and children are iron-deficient.

The role of gender in economic activities with special reference to women's participation and empowerment in rural Bangladesh

Bangladesh is known as a predominantly male-dominated society with traditional and religious beliefs that restrict women’s mobility and participation in economic and social activities. This article is based on national rural representative household-level data collected in 1987 and 2000 from 62 villages in Bangladesh jointly conducted by the International Rice Research Institute and Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies. First, this article depicts patterns of women’s work and analyzes the factors that influence the gender division of labor.

Linking small-scale fisheries and aquaculture to household nutritional security: an overview

Small-scale fisheries and aquaculture have been recognized as important opportunities to enhance household food security in developing countries. While interventions aiming at promoting these activities reveal many positive effects, their direct and indirect impacts on nutritional status have not yet been fully documented. The objective of this paper is to identify more specifically the potential pathways that exist between fish-related livelihoods (small-scale fisheries, fish farming) and household nutritional security.

GIFT tilapia raise culture efficiency in Sri Lanka

The wide distribution and ongoing improvement of GIFT tilapia in Sri Lanka is raising the living standards of poor people and contributing to gender equality through employment for women in rural areas. So far, the GIFT fish have undergone four generations of selection for increased harvest weight in Sri Lanka. Now preferred in varied culture systems across the country, GIFT fish grow faster and have higher survival than local tilapia stocks.

Gender mainstreaming in community fisheries management

In Cambodia, women have traditionally been regarded as poor in terms of physically ability and knowledge. The voices of women have often been unheard in terms of social influence and decision-making. Therefore, the Fisheries Administration and community-based Natural Resource Management Learning Institute initiated a study focusing on the roles, needs and aspirations of women in fishing and community fisheries management in coastal regions of Cambodia.

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