Communication interventions for gender equality and social equity in aquatic agricultural systems: A review of the literature

In light of recent calls to integrate gender equality and social equity (GESE) strategies into development projects, researchers have begun to explore the gender-related inequalities in aquatic agricultural systems (AAS) and agriculture. This literature review addresses a gap in existing research by identifying the role of GESE-related communication components in AAS and agricultural interventions.

CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health

In the developing world, more than 1 billion people depend on fish for most of their animal protein, and another 1 billion people depend on livestock. Poor people, especially women and children, typically eat very little meat, milk and fish. This contributes to nutrient deficiencies and poor physical and cognitive development for children and poor health and livelihood outcomes for adults.

Building coalitions, creating change: An agenda for gender transformative research in agricultural development

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) has developed its Gender Research in Development Strategy centered on a transformative approach. Translating this strategy into actual research and development practice poses a considerable challenge, as not much (documented) experience exists in the agricultural sector to draw on, and significant innovation is required. A process of transformative change requires reflecting on multiple facets and dimensions simultaneously.

Annual report 2012/13

This Annual Report provides just a few examples of the pathways through which WorldFish's work delivers benefits to poor people who rely on fish for food. You will find stories about: 1) Egyptian farmers who are now benefiting from faster growing fish strains; 2) Women in Bangladesh whose incomes have grown because of the increases in production that pond management training has provided; and 3) Improvements in access to fishing grounds and local employment that investment in strengthening aquatic resource governance in Zambia have delivered.

Women's traditional fishery and alternative aquatic resource livelihood strategies in the Southern Cameroonian Rainforest

To inform the development of alternative livelihoods, the women's traditional alok fishery in the Campo-Ma'an National Park and buffer zone of southern Cameroon were studied over 15 months. Participatory rural appraisal was used to characterise livelihood strategies among 45 households. Thirty-three cultured crops, nine farmed animal species and 65 non-timber forest products, including 31 bushmeat species are cultivated in, or harvested from, the forest. Transport is a major impediment to commercial trade of all local products.

Trading fish for sex in sub-Saharan Africa

Chris Béné's article "Women and Fish-for-Sex" (FFS) is being highlighted in this issue of id21. The researchers use the example of a small-scale fishing community in the Kafue flats region of Zambia, and review other cases in the world. They demonstrate how economic impoverishment, which is often put forward to explain FFS transactions, is too simplistic to capture the complexity of the FFS phenomenon.

Role of women in small-scale aquaculture development in southeastern Cambodia

In Cambodia, women make up more than 65% of the adult population. They play a most important role in all spheres of social and economic activities. A recent investigation has shown that in small scale aquaculture, women have been found to contribute more than men in almost all activities. Details about this are discussed in this article.

The role of small indigenous fish species in food and nutrition security in Bangladesh.

In Bangladesh, only 6% of the daily food intake is animal food of which fish accounts for 50%. Rice is the mainstay, making up 60% of the daily food intake. However, many nutrients such as vitamins A and C, iron, calcium, zinc and iodine are not found in rice and have to be obtained from other sources. Small indigenous fish are a vital contribution to the diet of the rural poor in Bangladesh, where more than 30,000 children go blind every year from vitamin A deficiency and 70% of women and children are iron-deficient.

The role of gender in economic activities with special reference to women's participation and empowerment in rural Bangladesh

Bangladesh is known as a predominantly male-dominated society with traditional and religious beliefs that restrict women’s mobility and participation in economic and social activities. This article is based on national rural representative household-level data collected in 1987 and 2000 from 62 villages in Bangladesh jointly conducted by the International Rice Research Institute and Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies. First, this article depicts patterns of women’s work and analyzes the factors that influence the gender division of labor.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Gender