Changing traditions: first global look at the gender dimensions of fisheries

The Asian Fisheries Society and the WorldFish Center conducted the first ever Global Symposium on Gender and Fisheries in Penang, Malaysia, from 30 November to 4 December 2004. The two-day Symposium, held in conjunction with the 7th Asian Fisheries Forum, attracted 30 papers by over 100 authors and strong audience discussions that covered countries from Kiribati, through Asia Pacific, Africa, Europe and to the Arctic. The flavor of the Symposium was of changing traditions and recognition of the contributions of different groups to fisheries.

Small scale fisheries in the neotrophics: research and management issues

The lack of comprehensive regional treatments of small scale fisheries and the need for improved information for management purposes of this sector in the region are emphasized. Estimating total catches, mapping the seasonal deployment of fleets and quantifying their fishing effort as well as computing catch per unit effort and cost per unit catch for all major gears/species are crucial. In addition, the need to understand oftenly neglected issues, such as the mobility of fisherfolk in and out of the fishery and the role of women in production, distribution and trade are emphasized.

Report on gender training with gender module: shrimp quality support project 2, implemented by WorldFish Center, support by USAID

Earlier studies and works done in the first phase of the shrimp quality support project revealed that gender discrimination is widespread in the value chain of shrimp sub-sector. As such the SQSP 2 has the objective to provide training on gender development to the different stakeholders of the shrimp value chain to aware and sensitize them to employ more women to achieve gender equality and mainstream gender in the sub-sector.

On her own feet

Mrs Jessie Kaunde is proud to be one of the small, but growing, number of women who farm fish on their own. She recognised fish farming as an opportunity to provide herself with a better future back in 1999, when she heard a radio programme describing the technique. But what has made Mrs Kaunde so successful is that she really took to heart the idea of integrated farm management. So, as well as growing crops and fish, she also raises more than 500 chickens and ducks at a time, and uses their droppings to fertilize her ponds.

Involvement of rural women in aquaculture: an innovative approach.

Although women have proved to be competent in adopting new aquaculture technologies, their role is very much restricted and often ignored. One of the major reasons is the location of aquaculture sites and several sociocultural taboos against women who strive to earn for their family’s subsistence in rural areas. There is a gender bias in many aquaculture activities. To ensure that women utilize their full potential in profitable activities like aquaculture, it is necessary to provide capacity building support to rural women, which will eventually lead to their empowerment.

Gendered monitoring report: shrimp quality support project 2, implemented by WorldFish Center, supported by USAID

The Shrimp Quality Support Project 2 has started in December 2006 and completed in September 2007. A baseline survey has been conducted to find out the situation existed for the shrimp farmers at bench mark and at the end of intervention: a monitoring survey was conducted to observe the progress and impact made by the project. Different reports were generated on the findings of the surveys.

Fish as the "bank in the water" - evidence from chronic-poor communities in Congo

Small-scale fisheries in developing countries are often perceived as being a low-productivity and backward informal sector. As a result they are rarely considered in poverty reduction programmes and rural development planning. In this paper, we investigate the dual role of fish as a food and cash crop through data collected in river fisheries in Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Fishing in this very remote rural region of DRC is operated both by men and women, as part of a household multiple activity livelihood strategy.

Ethnic women in aquaculture in Nepal

The Women in Aquaculture project was launched in two districts of central Terai in Nepal jointly by AIT (Thailand) and Institute of Agriculture and Animal Science (Nepal). The project has trained five groups of about 150 women belonging to a traditional ethnic fishing community and supported by fish farming as a means of additional income generation and source of protein supply for the family.

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