The adoption process of ricefield-based fish seed production in Northwest Bangladesh: an understanding through quantitative and qualitative investigation

The purpose of the study was to understand the adoption process of ricefield based fish seed production (RBFSP) that has been developed, promoted and established in Northwest Bangladesh. Quantitative investigation based on regression analysis and qualitative investigation using semi-structured interview were carried out to enhance understanding of the adoption process of RBFSP.Quantitative regression analysis showed two important factors: 1) access to suitable rice-plot and 2) availability of tilapia broodfish at the famer level, facilitated adoption of RBFSP.

Report on involvement of women in shrimp technology development: shrimp quality support project 2, implemented by WorldFish Center

This report focused on the scope and promotion of women participation in shrimp value chain and find out the factors of gender equity and enhancement of women empowerment along with the value chain of the shrimp industry.

On her own feet

Mrs Jessie Kaunde is proud to be one of the small, but growing, number of women who farm fish on their own. She recognised fish farming as an opportunity to provide herself with a better future back in 1999, when she heard a radio programme describing the technique. But what has made Mrs Kaunde so successful is that she really took to heart the idea of integrated farm management. So, as well as growing crops and fish, she also raises more than 500 chickens and ducks at a time, and uses their droppings to fertilize her ponds.

Gender and Fisheries

This special issue with contributions from three worldfish scientists focuses on the gender dimensions of fisheries which provide rich ground for perspectives on development policy and community based strategies for livelihoods, gender and social justice.

Vulnerability of female fish traders to HIV/AIDS along the fish market chain of the south-eastern arm of Lake Malawi: Analysis report

The objectives of this study were first, to understand the market chain of fish as traded by women in the south-eastern Arm of Lake Malawi, with a specific focus on analyzing how fish is moved from the lake to the wholesale market. Secondly, the study identifies HIV/AIDS vulnerability factors along this market chain i.e. from the point of catch to the wholesale market.

Sustaining aquaculture by developing human capacity and enhancing opportunities for women

Women are active participants in aquaculture supply chains, but a dearth of gender-disaggregated information hampers accurate understanding of their contribution. Research results and FAO National Aquaculture Sector Overview (NASO) fact sheets show that female participation rates vary by type and scale of enterprise and country. Women are frequently active in hatcheries and dominate fish processing plant labourers. Women’s work in small-scale aquaculture frequently is unrecognized, under or unpaid.

The socio-economic context for improving food security through land based aquaculture in Solomon Islands: A peri-urban case study

Future fish demand-supply scenarios project that investment in aquaculture will be needed to ensure fish for food security in Solomon Islands. In 2010 a study of two peri-urban areas of Solomon Islands analysed the demand and potential for inland aquaculture, and the role of the introduced Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) in household livelihoods and existing value chains. Of 178 households interviewed, marine reef fish were the preferred fish for consumption, although tinned fish was also common.

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