Solomon Islands: Western Hub scoping report

Aquatic agricultural systems (AAS) are places where farming and fishing in freshwater and/or coastal ecosystems contribute significantly to household income and food security. Globally, the livelihoods of many poor and vulnerable people are dependent on these systems. In recognition of the importance of AAS, the CGIAR Research Program (CRP) is undertaking a new generation of global agricultural research programs on key issues affecting global food security and rural development. The overall goal of the research program is to improve the well-being of people dependent on these systems.

Small-scale fisheries through the wellbeing lens

Despite longstanding recognition that small-scale fisheries make multiple contributions to economies, societies and cultures, assessing these contributions and incorporating them into policy and decision-making has suffered from a lack of a comprehensive integrating ‘lens’. This paper focuses on the concept of ‘wellbeing’ as a means to accomplish this integration, thereby unravelling and better assessing complex social and economic issues within the context of fisheries governance.

Shrimp (Penaeus monodon) farming in the coastal areas of Bangladesh: Challenges and prospects towards sustainable development

This chapter mainly presents the history of shrimp aquaculture in Bangladesh and impacts of shrimp farming on rural livelihoods with particular focus on income and dietary consumption, based on literature reviews and structured field surveys. The chapter also focuses on the complexities of land use patterns and recommends a holistic approach to adopt integrated zoning principles into national policies to sustain shrimp farming in Bangladesh.

Resource conflict, collective action, and resilience: an analytical framework

Where access to renewable natural resources essential to rural livelihoods is highly contested, improving cooperation in resource management is an important element in strategies for peacebuilding and conflict prevention. While researchers have made advances in assessing the role of environmental resources as a causal factor in civil conflict, analysis of the positive potential of collective natural resource management efforts to reduce broader conflict is less developed.

Planning the use of fish for food security in Solomon Islands

This study was funded through the USAID-supported Coral Triangle Support Partnership (CTSP). This study provides an insight into the changing demand for fish in the Solomon Islands over the next 20 years. It supports US CTI Indicator 3 — “Number of policies, laws, agreements, or regulations promoting sustainable natural resource management and conservation that are implemented as a result of USG assistance”.

Methods of consensus building for community-based fisheries management in Bangladesh and the Mekong Delta

A method of consensus building for management of wetlands and fisheries using a systematic approach to participatory planning and initially developed in Bangladesh is now being applied in both Bangladesh and the Mekong delta. The method recognizes diversity in livelihoods and works through a structured learning and planning process that focuses on common interests. It works with each category of stakeholder separately to prioritize the natural resource problems that their livelihoods are largely dependent on; they then share and agree common priorities in plenary.

Livelihoods and fisheries governance in a contemporary Pacific Island setting

Inshore marine resources play an important role in the livelihoods of Pacific Island coastal communities. However, such reliance can be detrimental to inshore marine ecosystems. Understanding the livelihoods of coastal communities is important for devising relevant and effective fisheries management strategies. This study examined livelihood considerations within fisheries governance in a contemporary Pacific Island setting.

Limits to resilience from livelihood diversification and social capital in lake social–ecological systems

Diversity of both social networks and livelihood sources plays a central role in determining the sustainability of natural resource use and resilience of social–ecological systems, not least in resource-dependent economies. Yet the types of social capital and characteristics of diversity are not well understood. Here we examine social capital and livelihood diversification strategies in dynamic lakeshore social–ecological systems in Uganda adapting to climate variability and change.

Investing in collaboration to manage environmental resource conflict

Conflict over environmental resources endangers rural people’s livelihoods and can increase the risk of broader social conflict. Yet action to sustain shared resources can also be a potent source of community building. Investing in capacities for conflict management can help launch innovations that build resilient rural livelihoods and strengthen institutions for equitable environmental governance. Governments and development agencies should invest in such capacity and integrate collaborative dialogue about environmental resources into program and policy implementation.

Institutional Profiles from the Tonle Sap Lake Region: Findings from Informant Interviews

This report is based on key informant interviews conducted in 6 of the 12 villages in the Tonle Sap Lake Region where the WorldFish-led CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) proposes to work with local communities and other stakeholders to address natural resource management and related livelihood challenges. The socioeconomic setting of the Tonle Sap Lake is characterized by a rapidly growing population, high poverty levels and deep dependence on natural resources.

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