Redistribution of water use and benefits among hydropower affected communities in Lao PDR

In this paper, we assess how resettlement and changes in water access have altered livelihoods of local communities upstream of the Theun Hinboun Expansion Project in Lao PDR. Based on household surveys conducted both before and after resettlement, we estimate changes in water use and benefits among households of 4 resettled villages.

Protecting small-scale farmers: a reality within a globalized economy?

Aquaculture is still the fastest-growing food-producing sector and plays an important role in enhancing global food security and alleviating poverty. Tens of millions of people are engaged in aquaculture production, the majority of whom are small-scale farmers who have limited resources and are faced with difficulties due to increasing globalization and the resultant trade liberalization of aquaculture products. Despite these challenges, small-scale farmers remain innovative and continue to contribute to global aquaculture production.

Promising practices in food security and nutrition assistance to vulnerable households in the Tonle Sap Region, Cambodia

The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) seeks to reduce poverty and improve food security for many small-scale fishers and farmers who are dependent on aquatic agriculture systems by partnering with local, national and international partners to achieve large-scale development impact. This study on promising practices in food security and nutrition assistance to vulnerable households in the Tonle Sap region forms part of the preliminary research that informs AAS work in the highly productive Mekong Delta and Tonle Sap Lake floodplain.

Profitability of small-scale fisheries in Elmina, Ghana

In order to achieve sustainable fishing livelihoods in coastal communities, data on profitability of small-scale fisheries relative to fish species hauled and gear types used by fishermen is required as part of a broader fisheries management strategy. This study was undertaken with this in mind. Findings from this study suggest high rates of exploitation, in that stocks generally cannot provide for increased economic return in the face of increased investment.

Participatory action research on climate risk management, Bangladesh

The rural populations of southern Bangladesh are some of the most vulnerable communities in the world to the future impacts of climate change. They are particularly at risk from floods, waterlogged soils, and increasing salinity of both land and water. The objective of this project was to analyze the vulnerability of people in four villages that are experiencing different levels of soil salinity.

Locally-managed marine areas: multiple objectives and diverse strategies

Community-based management and co-management are mainstream approaches to marine conservation and sustainable resource management. In the tropical Pacific, these approaches have proliferated through the spread of locally-managed marine areas (LMMAs). LMMAs have garnered support because they can be adapted to different contexts and focus on locally identified objectives, negotiated and implemented by the people involved.

Livelihood strategies of tiger shrimp post larvae collectors in backkhali river estuary, cox’s bazar of Bangladesh

This study aim was to understand the livelihoods of tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon, Fabricius, 1798) post larvae collectors in the Backkhali river estuary areas under Cox’s Bazar district in Bangladesh during November 2010 to April 2011 where shrimp fry are caught. There are about 130-140 families and about 1000 people are living in the adjacent area. Most of the fry collectors have no land or house. They build house on Government (khas) land near the coast, the housing is mainly with earthen/bamboo or polythen.

Limits to resilience from livelihood diversification and social capital in lake social–ecological systems

Diversity of both social networks and livelihood sources plays a central role in determining the sustainability of natural resource use and resilience of social–ecological systems, not least in resource-dependent economies. Yet the types of social capital and characteristics of diversity are not well understood. Here we examine social capital and livelihood diversification strategies in dynamic lakeshore social–ecological systems in Uganda adapting to climate variability and change.

Institutional arrangements in seasonal floodplain management under community-based aquaculture in Bangladesh

Seasonal floodplains under private and public ownership in the Indo-Ganges river basin provide food and income for millions of people in Bangladesh. Floodplain ownership regimes are diverse, covering the whole spectrum from public to private ownership. The paper compares community-based fish culture projects in these floodplains and analyzes the institutional arrangements of three different Floodplain Management Committees (FMC).

Impacts of climate change and variability on fish value chains in Uganda

Fish are a significant source of income and food security in Uganda, highly vulnerable to climate and non-climate related drivers of change. This study examines the vulnerability of the fish sector in Uganda as it relates to the predicted impacts from climate change and variability, using the concept of the value chain. The specific purpose of the study was to identify current and potential impact pathways of climate change and corresponding adaptation strategies in fish value chains.


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