Solomon Islands: Western Province situation analysis

Aquatic agricultural systems (AAS) are places where farming and fishing in freshwater and/or coastal ecosystems contribute significantly to household income and food security. Globally, the livelihoods of many poor and vulnerable people are dependent on these systems. In recognition of the importance of AAS, the CGIAR Research Program (CRP) is undertaking a new generation of global agricultural research programs on key issues affecting global food security and rural development.

Small-scale aquaculture development model for rural Nepal

The majority of rural farmers in Nepal are small holders and their livelihood is based on agriculture. Three projects on small- scale aquaculture, with focus on women’s involvement, were completed in Kathar and Kawasoti Village Development Committees (VDCs) of Chitwan and Nawalparasi districts, respectively during 2000-2007. Based on the experience from these projects, guidelines/ steps for the development of small-scale aquaculture in rural areas were drawn.

Profitability of small-scale fisheries in Elmina, Ghana

In order to achieve sustainable fishing livelihoods in coastal communities, data on profitability of small-scale fisheries relative to fish species hauled and gear types used by fishermen is required as part of a broader fisheries management strategy. This study was undertaken with this in mind. Findings from this study suggest high rates of exploitation, in that stocks generally cannot provide for increased economic return in the face of increased investment.

Participatory action research on climate risk management, Bangladesh

The rural populations of southern Bangladesh are some of the most vulnerable communities in the world to the future impacts of climate change. They are particularly at risk from floods, waterlogged soils, and increasing salinity of both land and water. The objective of this project was to analyze the vulnerability of people in four villages that are experiencing different levels of soil salinity.

Mariculture development and livelihood diversification in the Philippines

This paper aims to evaluate mariculture as sustainable livelihood diversification option for coastal fishers in the Philippines and guide policy development in this direction. Mariculture in the Philippines refers to the culture of finfishes, shellfish, seaweeds and other commodities in cages, pens, stakes and rafts in marine environment. This paper evaluates the biophysical and socioeconomic contexts in which mariculture operate.

Locally-managed marine areas: multiple objectives and diverse strategies

Community-based management and co-management are mainstream approaches to marine conservation and sustainable resource management. In the tropical Pacific, these approaches have proliferated through the spread of locally-managed marine areas (LMMAs). LMMAs have garnered support because they can be adapted to different contexts and focus on locally identified objectives, negotiated and implemented by the people involved.

Livelihood strategies of tiger shrimp post larvae collectors in backkhali river estuary, cox’s bazar of Bangladesh

This study aim was to understand the livelihoods of tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon, Fabricius, 1798) post larvae collectors in the Backkhali river estuary areas under Cox’s Bazar district in Bangladesh during November 2010 to April 2011 where shrimp fry are caught. There are about 130-140 families and about 1000 people are living in the adjacent area. Most of the fry collectors have no land or house. They build house on Government (khas) land near the coast, the housing is mainly with earthen/bamboo or polythen.

Limits to resilience from livelihood diversification and social capital in lake social–ecological systems

Diversity of both social networks and livelihood sources plays a central role in determining the sustainability of natural resource use and resilience of social–ecological systems, not least in resource-dependent economies. Yet the types of social capital and characteristics of diversity are not well understood. Here we examine social capital and livelihood diversification strategies in dynamic lakeshore social–ecological systems in Uganda adapting to climate variability and change.

Innovations to strengthen aquatic resource governance on Cambodia’s Tonle Sap Lake

Cambodia’s recent freshwater fishery sector reform, instigated at the top level of government, is one of the country’s most significant contemporary policy developments addressing natural resources management and rural development. Implemented in two main waves, the reforms culminated in the complete removal of inland commercial fishing lots. Yet serious problems still need to be addressed, including reportedly widespread illegal fishing, difficulties in protecting critical habitats, and competition among state agencies over resource management authority.

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