A guide to mangrove rehabilitation in Solomon Islands

There are about 30 species of mangroves in Solomon Islands, representing 40% of the world’s mangrove species. They can be found on most islands and it is estimated that mangroves here cover an area of about 50 000 hectares. Mangroves are an important resource for livelihoods of rural coastal communities. However there is not an endless supply. Communities need to plan now to think about developing ways to help conserve and protect mangroves for future generations.

A Governance analysis of the Barotse Floodplain System, Zambia: Identifying obstacles and opportunities

The Barotse floodplain is an ecosystem characterized by a paradox of widespread poverty amidst high ecological and agricultural potential. The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) seeks to address this paradox on the assumption that the rural poor have the potential to transform their lives using the aquatic resources in their environment. Understanding the conditions for natural resources use and management is critical for a program that seeks to transform the livelihoods of households dependent on natural resources.

Fish diversity and fish consumption in Bangladesh

Bangladesh prides itself on being very rich in fish diversity. Its numeroud and diverse inland waterbodies and paddy fields are home to over 267 freshwater fish species. Biodiversity of fish species is important for nutrition and livelihoods of the rural poor in Bangladesh. There are promising fisheries technologies which have been developed and are being practised for improving fish biodiversity and nutrition.

Feed the future aquaculture project: October 2011-Sept 2012

The Feed the Future Aquaculture project is a five year transformative investment in aquaculture focused on 20 southern districts in Barisal, Khulna and Dhaka divisions, Bangladesh. This report describes the achievements of FtF-Aquaculture project activities implemented during FY12. Some of the targets for production and associated income have not been achieved yet as a large share of the fish will be harvested after closing of the reporting period. However, on the basis of growth monitoring, indications are that production is on track to achieve the targets.

Community fish refuges in Cambodia: Lesson learned

Cambodia's wetlands cover over 30 percent of the country’s land area and support one of the largest, most diverse and intensive freshwater fisheries in the world. In the flood season (July-February), the flood waters from the Mekong River and Tonle Sap Lake catchments create a vast open water system on Cambodia’s lowlands. During this period, inundated rice fields become open access fishing grounds for local villagers and migrant fishers.

Community-based adaptation to climate change in Solomon Islands: Lessons learned from Gizo communities, Western Province

This report summarizes activities carried out by WorldFish under Agreement CT09 Amendment No.2 dated 31 March 2010 between WorldFish and WWF, under the Coral Triangle Support Partnership (CTSP) project. The overall goal of the five-year CTSP project is “to improve the management of biologically and economically important coastal and marine resources and associated ecosystems that support the livelihoods of peoples and economies in the Coral Triangle”.

Collaborating for resilience: conflict, collective action, and transformation on Cambodia’s Tonle Sap Lake

Tha authors report on outcomes and lessons learned from a 15-month initiative in Cambodia’s Tonle Sap Lake. Employing the appreciation-influence-control (AIC) model of participatory stakeholder engagement, the initiative built shared understanding of the sources of vulnerability in fisheries livelihoods and catalyzed collective action to support resilience in this valuable and productive social-ecological system.

CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic and Agricultural Systems

Nearly 500 million people in the developing world depend on aquatic agricultural systems for their livelihoods, with 140 million of these people living in poverty. Occurring along freshwater floodplains and coastal deltas, aquatic agricultural systems are highly productive farming and fishing systems that provide multiple opportunities for growing or harvesting food and generating income.

Catalyzing collective action to address natural resource conflict: lessons from Cambodia's Tonle Sap Lake

This paper reports on outcomes and lessons learned from a 15-month initiative aimed at strengthening collective action to address natural resource conflict in Cambodia’s Tonle Sap Lake. Employing the Appreciation-Influence-Control (AIC) model of participatory stakeholder engagement, the initiative aimed in particular to build collective understanding of the sources of vulnerability in fisheries livelihoods and to catalyze efforts to support resilience in this valuable and productive socialecological system.

Carp-SIS polyculture: A new intervention to improve women’s livelihoods, income and nutrition in Terai, Nepal

Based on lessons learned from field trials, carp-small indigenous fish species (SIS)-prawn polyculture technology was improved to a "carp-SIS polyculture" technology suitable for small scale farmers in Terai, Nepal. In December 2008, the project was initiated to improve income and nutrition of Tharu women in Chitwan (100 farmers) and Kailali (26 farmers) districts. The present paper presents the final results of the project.


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