Impacts of climate change and variability on fish value chains in Uganda

Fish are a significant source of income and food security in Uganda, highly vulnerable to climate and non-climate related drivers of change. This study examines the vulnerability of the fish sector in Uganda as it relates to the predicted impacts from climate change and variability, using the concept of the value chain. The specific purpose of the study was to identify current and potential impact pathways of climate change and corresponding adaptation strategies in fish value chains.

A guide to mangrove rehabilitation in Solomon Islands

There are about 30 species of mangroves in Solomon Islands, representing 40% of the world’s mangrove species. They can be found on most islands and it is estimated that mangroves here cover an area of about 50 000 hectares. Mangroves are an important resource for livelihoods of rural coastal communities. However there is not an endless supply. Communities need to plan now to think about developing ways to help conserve and protect mangroves for future generations.

Good governance of rice field fishery management

Rice field fisheries refer to the capture of wild fish and other aquatic animals from flooded rice field agroecosystems and their supporting infrastructure, such as canals, channels, streams and other bodies of water. Central to maintaining fish productivity in rice fields is a designated conservation area known as a community fish refuge (CFR) that connects to rice fields to form an area known as the zone of influence.

Gender situational analysis of the Barotse Floodplain

Zambia’s rivers, lakes and wetlands support extensive agriculture, fisheries and livestock production and contribute to the livelihoods of about 3 million people or 25% of the country’s population. These aquatic agricultural systems are particularly important to poor people and provide significant opportunities for agriculture-based economic growth. The majority (72%) of the Zambian population is engaged in agricultural activities, of which almost 65% are women. There is now widespread recognition of the importance of gender and development.

Foods and diets of communities involved in inland aquaculture in Malaita Province, Solomon Islands

Solomon Islands has a population of just over half a million people, most of whom are rural-based subsistence farmers and fishers who rely heavily on fish as their main animal-source food and for income. The nation is one of the Pacific Island Counties and Territories; future shortfalls in fish production are projected to be serious, and government policy identifies inland aquaculture development as one of the options to meet future demand for fish.

Focal community profiles for Barotse Hub, Zambia.

The purpose of the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) focal community profiles is to provide basic descriptions of initial conditions in each community where AAS works in the Barotse Floodplain (the Barotse Hub) in Zambia’s Western Province. This information will contribute to, among other things, (i) evaluating change through future benchmarking activities; (ii) developing hub-specific panel research designs to answer program and initiative research questions; and (iii) strengthening current community engagement processes.

Fish for the future: Fisheries development and food security for Kiribati in an era of global climate change

The Republic of Kiribati is a vast South Pacific island group with one of the largest exclusive economic zones (EEZs) in the world. Kiribati waters support a wealth of marine fisheries activities. These activities occur in oceanic, coastal and inshore environments and range from large, foreign, industrial-scale oceanic fishing operations to small-scale, domestic, inshore subsistence fisheries, aquaculture and recreational fisheries.

An ecosystem approach to small-scale fisheries through participatory diagnosis in four tropical countries

Participatory diagnosis is an approach to identify, prioritize and mobilise around factors that constrain or enable effective governance and management in small-scale fisheries. Diagnostic frameworks are mostly designed and used for systematic scientific analysis or impact evaluation. Through participation they also have potential to guide contextually informed improvements to management in practice, including transitions to contemporary forms of governance like the ecosystem approach to fisheries (EAF).

Cost-effective methods for accurate determination of sea level rise vulnerability: A Solomon Islands example

For millions of people living along the coastal fringe, sea level rise is perhaps the greatest threat to livelihoods over the coming century. With the refinement and downscaling of global climate models and increasing availability of airborne-lidar-based inundation models, it is possible to predict and quantify these threats with reasonable accuracy where such information is available. For less developed countries, especially small island states, access to high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from lidar is limited.

Community water access, availability and management in the Tonle Sap region, Cambodia

During the rollout of CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) in Tonle Sap in 2013, water management was highlighted as one of the key development challenges. With limited capacity to regulate water, the situation oscillates between too much water in the wet season and too little water in the dry season.

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